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Matthew Doucette

Unity [java] Java compilers/editors (which to use?)

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I am looking for suggestions on which Java compiler and editor I should use. I am running Windows XP Home Edition. I'm new to Java programming (excluding my university "education"), so bear with me. -- JAVA EDITOR -- Dmytry meantioned "scite". If I have this straight, scite is just a text editor and a config file (Dmytry posted one in this thread) sets it to code Java more effectively. This must be it: http://www.scintilla.org/SciTE.html This seems to work fine, unless you have another suggestion. -- JAVA COMPILER -- Dmytry posted a huge list of Java compilers: http://www.thefreecountry.com/compilers/java.shtml I am lost with this list. It would be greatly appreciate if you can suggest which compiler to use. It would save me time testing out various compilers (when I have no experience.) ... For those who care, I need to test out some "Improved" Perlin Noise using the *exact* code Ken Perlin used to properly determine the range of Perlin Noise. [Edited by - Doucette on December 15, 2004 10:58:05 AM]

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Quote:
Original post by Alpha_ProgDes
i use JCreator.
simple and easy to use. not as robust as NetBeans though.
Thanks for the suggestion. This must be its website: jcreator.com. (It's a very professional looking site!) There are two versions, PRO and LE. PRO has a 30 day trial demo and is $69 USD to buy. LE is freeware (must submit an email address).

Is JCreator only an IDE? If so, what compiler do you recommend?

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For the compiler, just use the one that comes with Sun's Java SDK. Unless you're doing something specialised, there isn't much reason to use another one. I've used IBM's Jikes in a project before because the compiler runs slightly faster, but Sun's 1.5 compiler is quicker now.



As for editing Java code, I just use my favourite text editor (TextPad in Windows and Kate in Linux) with Sun's command-line tools and Makefiles. As long as your editor has good syntax highlighting, grouping files up into projects etc. it means you can use the same interface for whatever programming language you're using. For example, I'd hate to have to download, try and learn several different IDEs when I switch between C, Java, C++, PHP, Perl etc. It stops you becoming dependant on a certain GUI interface and it's also easier when you are using different languages together in one project. You might want to take a look at Eclipse and JEdit though if you really want a IDE.

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Quote:
Original post by seanw
As for editing Java code, I just use my favourite text editor (TextPad in Windows and Kate in Linux) with Sun's command-line tools and Makefiles. As long as your editor has good syntax highlighting, grouping files up into projects etc. it means you can use the same interface for whatever programming language you're using. For example, I'd hate to have to download, try and learn several different IDEs when I switch between C, Java, C++, PHP, Perl etc. It stops you becoming dependant on a certain GUI interface and it's also easier when you are using different languages together in one project. You might want to take a look at Eclipse and JEdit though if you really want a IDE.
Thanks for the insight.

I regularly use MSVC++'s IDE (I guess it would actually be Microsoft Visual C++ .NET's IDE). If I can get away with using my MSVC++ IDE, then that is good enough for me.

Quote:
Original post by seanw
For the compiler, just use the one that comes with Sun's Java SDK. Unless you're doing something specialised, there isn't much reason to use another one. I've used IBM's Jikes in a project before because the compiler runs slightly faster, but Sun's 1.5 compiler is quicker now.
I'm doing nothing specialized. I want the most often used 'standard' compiler. So, this is what I should get:

Java 2 Platform, Standard Edition, v 1.4.2 (J2SE)
http://java.sun.com/j2se/1.4.2/download.html

From the above link, the first link (Download J2SE v 1.4.2_04 SDK with NetBeans 3.6 Bundle) ships the SDK with the netBeans IDE. It is 92.79 MB! This may take some time on my less-than-56k connection. Is netBeans worth trying over my MSVC++ IDE?

The second link (no direct link to post) ships just the SDK (Java(TM) 2 SDK, Standard Edition 1.4.2_06). I guess this is what you want if you do not want to use netBeans. It is 51.59 MB!

Quote:
Original post by marcels
you may give a try to eclipse, it is very popular
Eclipse seems similar to SciTE. (They are two general IDEs for editing various types of code.) Which is best?! (I am trying to avoid downloading and testing everything myself, so I just want opinions. I hope this is OK.)

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I'm using IBM's Jikes. Very small compiler, works just great, i downloaded it when i had insanely high pricing of internet access... and i use SciTE for Java, HTML, and PHP editing.

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Guest Anonymous Poster
Wow. How could anyone possibly think Scite is similar to eclipse?


Eclipse is ... almost MSVC++, but converted to java's way of working (packages are supported in clever ways etc), with extra bits added.

Netbeans is ... an attempt to build all the same features, but using a modular plugins system like JEdit

JEdit is ... an attempt to make a modern, GUI, pluggable modular text editor that can be converted to doing anything. Basically: Emacs, but easier to use, using scripted java instead of scripted LISP.

IDEA is ... just like eclipse, but commercial, and better in some ways, worse in others.

More java developers use Eclipse than anything else. I have a suspicion that more use Eclipse than all the others mentioned above combined. Eclipse is the *youngest* of the above IDEs; it's popularity is immense.

Unfortunately, it's got lots of bugs, and has lots of pissing little problems that can easily put you off. However, it is undeniable that Eclipse has the best future of all the currently available free IDE's, and probably better than all the commercial ones simply because being free it's going to dominate the market.

i.e. get Eclipse now, get used to it now, and as you upgrade through later versions you'll soon have an IDE that is better than all the others.

PS: why is it called Eclipse? Because netbeans was invented by Sun, and netbeans was until very recently utter crap, and "an eclipse" == "over-shadowing of the sun".

This actually says a lot about what eclipse aims to be (it thinks Big) and where people expect it to go. The latest NB fights back, but is it too little, too late? Even with the official Sun support?

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Guest Anonymous Poster
PS: eclipse annoys me. I hate it. But ... it's the best free IDE I've ever used, and it's as good - or better - as a lot of very expensive (think thousands of dollars) commercial ones I've had licensed for me by previous employers.

THe main problem is that it's bugs are all annoying little thigns, like a bug in how it pasts comments, which deletes the indentation in the first line of the comment. You get pissed on by this bug 5 times a day, but in the grand scheme of things it is utterly unimportant.

So. Using eclipse is irritating, but it has incredible time-saving features, and at the same time it lacks the major or dangerous bugs and problems of other "big" IDE's (in particular it's so much faster than all previous netbeans it's enough to make NB users cry...)

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Guest Anonymous Poster
Get the latest sdk/jdk (java 5.0) http://java.sun.com/j2se/1.5.0/download.jsp but not with netbeans if you are as you said on a slow connection. Maybe crimson editor might be a solution? Its a "source editor" its free and rather small (1224KB)to download. http://www.crimsoneditor.com/

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