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Linux for programming

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Hey guys and gals, I would like to know, in your opinions, what is the best version of linux I should run in order to program with. I will be installing it on an old Pentium 133mhz, 32mb ram, 2GB hard drive. I am not looking for lindows live,knoppix, or any other cd boot types. I would like to do a HD install and develop my programs on it. I plan on using whatever linux C/C++ compilers there are, I think the GNU C++ one. I already I have my windows programming box setup, so I would like some advice on a linux os before I choose one. I would like it to be fairly *easy* to install, but I dont mind a few challenges [wink]. Thank you for your time! - Drew

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Debian. I would say hands down, but some people would point out that slackware would work on that system as well.

Be sure not to download any of the CDs, however. Get the netinstall disk. And make sure you upgrade (or install) the testing distribution, not stable.

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Original post by C-Junkie
Debian. I would say hands down, but some people would point out that slackware would work on that system as well.

Be sure not to download any of the CDs, however. Get the netinstall disk. And make sure you upgrade (or install) the testing distribution, not stable.


Am I on the right page here? or should I be here: http://www.debian.org/distrib/floppyinst

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Well, if you want a run of the mill distro, use either debian or slackware, but if you want excitement and drama, use Gentoo!

For those who love to wait, or tediously type for hours on end, Gentoo is the way to go.

Seriously though, if you would also like to learn a lot about Linux as well, Gentoo will probably teach you the most, and will teach it to you fairly quickly. It's tough to install, but if you go to http://www.gentoo.org/ and check out the documentation, you'll see how much hand holding they do along the way. Just plan to spend several hours just doing the basic install. The big advantage for your hardware though, is that everything is compiled specifically for it, and only including the libraries that you want to include.

So, if you're a lazy slacker, try something else, but if you want to learn, install Gentoo.

Cheers

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On such an old machine, Vector Linux is probably the most usable. It is Slackware-based (so packages aren't perfect) but it is tuned for low-spec machines like your P166.

One note: If you like GUI applications, double that RAM. I'd be surprised if XFree86 would even start without going into swap.

Linux rules. Good luck!

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And if you want customization beyond your wildest dreams, try LFS . Basicly build your own distro. And if you stick to instructions it's really piece of cake (though that custom part suffers then a bit ;) ). It's GREAT for learning the insides of GNU/Linux environment.

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Original post by Winograd
And if you want customization beyond your wildest dreams, try LFS . Basicly build your own distro. And if you stick to instructions it's really piece of cake (though that custom part suffers then a bit ;) ). It's GREAT for learning the insides of GNU/Linux environment.


I'll have to take a look at that - sounds fun! Thanks for the suggestion.

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Original post by andrewk3652
Gentoo is the answer to *all* your problems. :-)


Gentoo is the answer? Dear god, what was the question?!

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Gentoo is the answer to *all* your problems. :-)

Gentoo is the answer? Dear god, what was the question?!

Mirror, mirror, on the wall, who's the shittiest of them all?

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Gentoo is the answer to *all* your problems. :-)

Gentoo is the answer? Dear god, what was the question?!

Mirror, mirror, on the wall, who's the shittiest of them all?


My, my, why such hostility towards Gentoo?

I've used the obligatory "beginner" distros, like SuSE. I've tried Red Hat and Slackware, too. I have to say my favorite distro has been Gentoo (which I currently use). Just curious why you dislike it so.

(Edited for grammar fixes.)

[Edited by - MikeMJH on December 18, 2004 1:48:31 AM]

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My, my, why such hostility towards Gentoo.
It's a reaction to the snobbery and misguided notion that building everything from scratch is a productive use of time and/or computing resources, or that it provides a performance boost because it's "customized". All it does it delay the onset of productivity.

An operating system exists to get out of the way.

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Original post by Doc
^^ What he said.
I was only jesting.


Right, I got that ;-). Only C-Junkie was a little harsher with his wording, like he has some kind of vendetta against Gentoo [wink].

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I actually do get a performance boost of almost 5-10% speed in using compiled gentoo over stock redhat (as compared by the various games and such I have - if nothing else, glxgears runs faster, and damnit that's all that matters! :-) )

However for most people it's really not necessary. I just prefer it. (That, and if I watch something build, I tend to trust it more. I love gentoo because with every other source build there's always the possibility of having a build break on you - I've *never* had that with Gentoo.)

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Original post by Oluseyi
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Original post by MikeMJH
My, my, why such hostility towards Gentoo.
It's a reaction to the snobbery and misguided notion that building everything from scratch is a productive use of time and/or computing resources, or that it provides a performance boost because it's "customized". All it does it delay the onset of productivity.

An operating system exists to get out of the way.


Well, you can get gentoo in precompiled, binary flavors. I prefer Gentoo for other reasons (such as, it's a lot like a LFS system where you set up the packages, except the packaging and bootstrapping parts are fully automated :) It takes me about 30 min. to set up a gentoo box installing, leave it for a few hours for binary packages or overnight/a day for source install, then another 15 min to finish the install.

EDIT: Plus portage rox compared to apt or yum

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Original post by bobstevens
I'd recommend Ubuntu. It's Debian but better.


I'm currently using Ubuntu, the only problem I've found is there's some incompatibilites in the universe packages for things like Mono, which is annoying if you want to do .NET development.

But Ubuntu is pretty nice if you've never used Linux before (like me).

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I'd recommend Gentoo, too. Though having seen the configuration of your PC makes me fear of the compilation time. However, it is possible with gentoo to compile it on a faster machine and then just copy it to a slower one. I do it so.

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Original post by Oluseyi
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Original post by MikeMJH
My, my, why such hostility towards Gentoo.
It's a reaction to the snobbery and misguided notion that building everything from scratch is a productive use of time and/or computing resources, or that it provides a performance boost because it's "customized". All it does it delay the onset of productivity.

An operating system exists to get out of the way.

I couldn't have said it better myself.

I despise gentoo because back when I used slackware, the newsgroup got raided by several gentoo trolls who proceeded to proclaim the god of distros to have arrived.

Gentoo envangelism has looked like nothing but trolling ever since.

It's helped by the fact that its evangelists tend to be either ricers, or clueless newbies. Ricers I despise. Clueless newbies are okay, except when they start advocating something.

That said, the gentoo developers I've seen on various mailing lists appear to be respectable. No clue why they're mixed up with such a crazy distro. [wink]

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Original post by evolutional
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Original post by bobstevens
I'd recommend Ubuntu. It's Debian but better.


I'm currently using Ubuntu, the only problem I've found is there's some incompatibilites in the universe packages for things like Mono, which is annoying if you want to do .NET development.
Seriously?

I'm not sure which I'm more surprised over. Mono being in universe, or mono being broken. Hmmm. If first-class support for Mono isn't planned for Hoary, I'm going to have to reconsider my "best distro out there" branding... (edit: Mono is on Hoary's supported list Ubuntu still rocks)

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