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Is it slow to have a view degree that matches human eyes?

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Slow or not, you gonna get some heavy perspective distortion with a field of view as large as the human eyes compressed to a small region like your monitor. Maybe you're going to see some difference from a smaller angle, since more is actually visible on the screen at a given time, but try and see what happens.

As for the angle being the full or half angle; try it and see for yourself. Set the angle to almost 180 degrees and ask yourself, "Do I get an almost complete 360 degree view of my scene?".

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It's not slow, but compare the width of a screen to the width of your vision. I have about 150deg focused vision and very nearly 180 total...compressing that into a monitor, which occupies maybe 30 degrees of the view, will cause significant distortion. It just doesn't work with a flat, rectangular, small screen.

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Quote:
Original post by Promit
which occupies maybe 30 degrees of the view, will cause significant distortion. It just doesn't work with a flat, rectangular, small screen.


youve been looking at your monitor from to far away, youve gotta actually have your nose touching the monitor to gain the full benifits

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Quote:
Original post by Promit
It's not slow, but compare the width of a screen to the width of your vision. I have about 150deg focused vision and very nearly 180 total...compressing that into a monitor, which occupies maybe 30 degrees of the view, will cause significant distortion. It just doesn't work with a flat, rectangular, small screen.


I can notice movement of my fingers on both sides simultaneously even when they are slightly behind my eyes. I'm not sure of the exact angle, but I suspect around 200 degrees. [smile]

Anyway,
By sitting close to a large high res monitor you could probably see about 90 degrees, but you'll probably kill your eyes by doing that :). There are some "screens" that makes it possible to sit "inside" the view, but AFAIK they're not released for the consumer market. It's possible to make one yourself though. All you need is one or more projectors and a semi-transparent (a white sheet will do) screen that forms a half-sphere or a cone. You'll have to correct the image to corrospond to the wierd screen geometry of course. Something like the fish-eye vertex shader in the DirectX SDK (I'm not sure if it's still there) could be used.

As for speed: It'll probably be a little slower depending on the culling algorithms. Usually you try to cull away everything outside the FOV, but if you double the FOV you'll obviously increase the amount of geometry that needs to be rendered.

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If any of you have ever seen a medical report about what is normal about the view range of a normal person, you've noticed that the normal angle is 180 degrees.
But considering the monitor as a window where one can see through, this angle should not exceed 60 degrees.

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