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      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
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atomic_west

the light is on and im home if i had one

7 posts in this topic

My name is matt Im smart and capable but having troubble getting it togather i want to program i have some basic experience with blitz basic and the amount of experience i have matches the name basic every time i have tryed to get into programming somthing goes wrong to make me have to stop i was in college for a four year degree in comp sci but had to drop out my first semester i need a programing god to teach me the trade and im hoping to find one here my light is on and im home but i need to learn to program can you help to teach me??
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if any one would volenteer to teach me id love to take you up on your offer i am very capable of learning and mastering programing specificly game programing but i need to learn from a person not a book
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OK. I came across your post completely by accident. I don't usually look at this forum, and I don't know what possessed me to tonight.

Anyway, I'm going to be brutally honest with you. No-one here, or anywhere else, will teach you to program for free, I'm afraid. Your college tutors were there for a reason. To teach you. They are paid to do that. It's their job. No-one will do that for free, simply because there's no reward for the time and effort they would have to put in. It's basic economics. Also, the vast majority of people here who could teach you are either employed on a full-time basis, or are working on their own projects. They don't have the time.

Blitz Basic is good to start out with, but it's just that: basic. The majority of games are written in C/C++, but that can be tough to learn when you're starting out. It's not user-friendly, and even experienced programmmers can be stumped for hours by an array overflow, or some other simple, but obscure problem. Get a good programming book for a language that's beginner-friendly, like Visual Basic, Ada, Python or Pascal. This will teach you the fundamentals of programming and software design. Once you've learnt this, you can progress to a more advanced language like C/C++, and then you can start playing with graphics APIs like OpenGL and Direct3D.

I won't lie to you: this will take time. You'll need to be patient. It'll probably take about six months to get started with a beginner's language, and get the experience you'll need to progress to something more complex like C/C++. However, this varies. Some people take to programming like a duck to water, and others have to work at it a bit more. Also, try to get back into college. The stuff you'll learn there if you apply yourself will amaze you. Why did you drop out in the first place?

I think you're probably a smart guy. You wouldn't have got into college to do Comp Sci if you weren't. Start small, make some simple programs, then go on from there. And make sure that you don't just learn a programming language. Learn algorithm and software design, because these work with any language you choose.

I've also re-written your original post below. Please take note. You don't come across as very capable when you haven't taken the time to check your spelling, punctuation and grammar:

"My name is Matt. I'm smart and capable, but I'm having trouble getting it together. I want to learn programming. I have used Blitz Basic, but the amount of experience I have matches the name: basic. Every time I have tried to get into programming, something goes wrong, and I stop. I was in college on a four-year Comp Sci degree, but I had to drop out in my first semester. I need a programming God to teach me the trade, and I'm hoping to find one here. My light is on and I'm home, but I need to learn to program from a real person. Can you help to teach me?"
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Quote:
Original post by atomic_west
i need to learn from a person not a book


Before anything, learn to learn from books and tutorials. It's not that hard.
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Nice kill guys, I love how we never see them again after someone is honest...

that might be why they are not in college anymore.
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im not gone and to be honest i found a great book but i still prefer human contact over a brainless book but ill live and i left college cuz in a single dad and i couldnt aford both the time or money out of home
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atmoic, if your interested I will help you with what I know.

The books suck :)

I program in Visual Basic.

AIM: FlexibleMorality
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atomic_west, I hate to bring it to you but most, and I mean most, successful programmers, or any programmer for this matter, is able to learn how to program themselves. Sadly, I must leave by saying, you are no where near a qualified programmer, no offense...
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