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Ketchaval

Passion -Survey

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Survey What situations have you encountered in single-player games that have struck you emotionally ? Even if it was only in your head, ie. you misinterpreted the signs and thought that you were being tricked .. This doesn''t include "meaningless" gameplay based ones.. ie. when your friend beat you to the rocket launcher in Quake ("meaningless" as in there is no game-world CONTEXT for this action to matter, beyond the matter of winning-losing-drawing.). But instead is about feeling for characters in games, thinking that the meeting that has been arranged in the pub is a trap set because they have found out that you helped the outlaw get to the healer, helping an old lady across the road or what have you.
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Ok, I''m going to get tarred and feathered here, but. . .

When Aeris died in FFVII, I thought it was a really great moment. I can''t say I was emotionally attached to any of the characters in that game, but just the anime sequence, taken by itself, was outstanding.

[offtopic]
Does anyone know a way to extract the FMV''s from FFVII and VIII? They''re the only reason I suffered through that dreck, and I''d like to see them again w/out subjecting my mind (and thumbs!) to such obscene punishment.
[/offtopic]

The only games that have really elicited an emotional reaction from me through the gameplay (and no, adrenaline does not count) have been ones that played up the suspense & horror. Thief, Metal Gear Solid, and the second Resident Evil come to mind. What set these apart was the AI tho'', combined w/ great atmosphere. In Thief, the fact that the gaurds gossiped, got spooked by noises, cursed my mother, etc. made me think twice about offing them! The AI in Resident Evil was perfect for its place. The zombies were freakin'' relentless!!! Hiding in a locked office, three bullets left in the chamber, rummaging through the desks for spare ammo, zombies scratching at the door. . . if you haven''t, play it in the dark sometime. . .alone. . .(BTW, horror movies don''t affect me in the slightest. But when you have a personal stake in the outcome, its a different story altogether)

If you see the Buddha on the road, Kill Him. -apocryphal
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Hell, I HATE Squaresoft games, but cinematically, that was a great moment. The most excellent choice they made was for there to be no music throughout the entire scene, inluding the battle. It got me, even, and I hated the character.

For me that most incredible moment came at the end of Panzer Dragoon Saga for the Sega saturn. The game left me in a haze for three days when I beat it. It''s not something I can explain....
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Walking into (Fall?''s) tattoo-parlour''s backroom in Plansecape: Torment and thinking that I had walked into a serial-killer''s room and was about to be killed. I RAN out of there pretty quick. This is an example of something just being in the player''s mind.

(All the skin with tattoos on)

In Baldur''s Gate, helping the sick (guard deserter/ outlaw) by taking him to the healer, and then later on having a kid try to take me to a meeting in the pub.. only to find out that it was like the national guard and I thought that they had found out about me and were setting me up.

(Long-term consequence of a player action, even though again this was only in the player''s head if they thought like that.).

Offtopic --Anonymous Poster, you can certainly watch the FMV (avi / mov?) in Final Fantasy 7, just find the folder with it in and double click on it. Enough talk of FMV please.
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Mmm, I know this is not exactly what you want, but I HAVE to say it.
The cinematics made by Blizzard, in Starcraft, Diablo II and the incoming Warcraft III give me thrills all over the place every single time I see them (the Ork stampede for WIII, the nuclear device dropping in Starcraft, the 7 min movie for Diablo II ... I couldnt be bothered playing this thing).
I played only a few hours of Final Fantasy VIII but loved every minute of it. Especially the fact that, not knowing the game, and believing that I could kill the Massive Spider Robot in the communication Tower, I lost a lot of time. so much in fact, that when the time comes for me to leave the island in a dramatic cinematic, my timer was running a 10 seconds countdown, and I was starting to worry that I'd have to restart from the last save point. THAT was absolutely unbelievable. When suddenly the game started playing the cinematic and the countdown faded out on a 01 second ... I was just SO relieved Hadn't had that in ages !

Those erotic manga games also have curious effects on my anatomy... uhh ... no, that's not what I wanted to say. I like the involvement they require. You can't get ALL the girls, you habe to make choices and stick with them, or you get naught (Seasons of Sakura, especially). Am I gonna go for the artsy shy girl, or for the swimming champion bitch? mmmm, hard choice indeed.
OK, you could take that paragraph as a joke, but I am not joking that much really

Some great moments have to be when you meet old known faces. I played Ultima VII. And meeting with my old friends again in the castle in Ultima Underworld II was a blast. Much more than a "oh I can play with my 30th level character again".

If adrenaline levels count I have to talk about FPS. Sometimes, they just kick major ass. I worried once or twice in HalfLife, loved the atmosphere, but it wasn't that scary. Doom was cool with all the lighting tricks, I got my share of adrenaline rushes ...
But I still remember the *PH3AR* I felt when I played the first world in Quake and this awful beast jumped at my face and ripped me apart in two shots That was great.
Same with the cyberdogs in Quake II. I got attacked and ripped apart in seconds. And for the rest of the game, I was just totally scared anytime I would hear their little noise. I would look all around the place, check my health, check my gun, get totally paranoid, and shoot until I'll gib them just to be sure ... all this while screaming and yelling at the screen "DIE you Bitch, BLAM BLAM yaaah take that !! who's barking now ?! BLAM BLAM".
Yeah, gotta love that
Sometimes, fear is good. But only if there is a chance to get out of it. If it becomes a Reload until you suceed, it sucks. I want emotion, not humiliation (I still wonder how I managed to play the whole Prince of Persia without getting a nervous breakdown ... oh yeah, the excellent sword fights ! )

youpla :-P

Edited by - ahw on October 21, 2000 4:30:48 PM
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The only one that comes to mind is the guards in Thief. As you''ve already mentioned it''s because of the attention to detail in the AI. The guard''s random singing to themselves, joking w/ one another, and so on made the player feel like they were more than "the terrible enemy that must be killed".


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Alys'' death in PS4. At the risk of being called a pussy (or worse), I''ll just say that this was one of the most emotional moments in gaming... and this was during the 8-bit era when FMV was unheard of.

Btw, go get an emu and play that series.. you won''t regret it.

Pretty much all of xenogears elicited emotion from me, mostly a what-the-hell/whoa thing... anyway...

Also, the "erotic manga games" have an uncanny ability to create atmosphere/mood... (the good ones anyway). In the end of nocturnal illusion, when you had to choose who you would take with you out of the psuedo-universe made me feel a bit melancholy/sad/whatever.

This is pretty much unique to FPSs'', but any situation where there is an eerie calm, then you''re suddenly thrown into a situation with no escape other than to fight your way out through lotsa enemies always make me panic.

I know you said to avoid this but... in TFC, I constantly jump out of my seat when shot by snipers... this happens in CS too, when I''m shot by anybody. Its just the ''waiting... waiting... waiting.. AGGUGHH!!! BAM BAM'' scenario I guess..
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There were moments while I was playing Sanitarium when I completely forgot the real world existed. There was a moment of utter horor and sickening amusement when a little kid wheeled his friend''s corpse by in a little red wagon... .

So anyway, is there a list of these "erotic manga games" anywhere? And are there any where you have to get guys? Fun fun fun...
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Back when I played X-Com, I had a great squad that had been together for over 50 missions. One day while responding to a terror mission a single alien took out my entire team in one turn. Boom, just like that I was kicked back into the world screen with no transport plane and no soldiers. It took a few for the realization to come over me that I was screwed.

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I have to agree about the Aeris thing, and most anything that relates to is. I have no idea why this creates just a dramatic response, it just does =P

Also, in Theif II (I assume there are things like this in Thief I, but I never played it) when the large Mechanist Machines came walking in to the room when you were doing something... Anyway, that seriously put me on edge, I''d only play the game in the dark to see the screen better and I bought a better set of headphones just to hear people walking better .

The eleventh hour did some good (or bad, depends on your personality I guess) things to your head. Nothing ever jumps out at you, but walking into a kitchen with fingers on the counter really gives you that death will soon follow by something jumping out of the dark corner feeling .


Null and Void
At least I don't know COBOL...

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I got all you guys beat.

The most emotional game I''ve ever had the fortune of playing is Princess Maker 2 on the PC. (There have been several incarnations of Princess Maker, but only the second one ever made it to the PC, unfortunately.)

The first time I finished the game, I almost cried.

The point of the game is to raise your daughter from 10 years of age to 18 years of age. You guide her progress through life. It''s your responsbility to give her a proper education, good working habits, a healthy diet, and an opportunity to make friends. You can also send her into the wilderness to gain combat experience, or you can have her participate in annual contests with other characters.

I should mention one other thing about Princess Maker: it is without a doubt the most dynamic game ever made. There are literally dozens of possible endings, and an infinite combination of skills your daughter can acquire while growing. So, if you guys want to talk dynamic plot, let''s talk Princess Maker.

When my daughter turned 18 and left me for the open arms of the world, it broke my heart. This is the only game that''s ever jerked that kind of emotional response from me. When you put that much time and thought into raising a virtual child, you can''t help but get emotionally attached to her.

As far as I know, the English PC version of Princess Maker is abandonware. If anyone would like to check it out (and I highly recommend it), let me know. I''ll try to find a place for you to download it.
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Hearing all this talk of the (in)famous Aeris death movie i dug out the PSX, the FF7 memory card(with the game saved RIGHT b4 the movie, and watched it...twice. I liked the game, it was rather good, but the shining moment was the few notes during that scene. I don''t think any other game has had such an effect over me.

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I agree with most of the things that have been listed here, especially Aeris'' death in FF7 -- they did a hell of a job with that one. And I agree with A. Buza... download a Genesis emulator and get PS4! And the rest of the series for that matter.

The other thing I love in games is when something can literally make you shake... I still remember playing the original Resident Evil alone in the dark at 3am, in the basement. The game had a lot of great atmosphere in it, abysmal voice acting aside. The best, though, was when I got to the scene where you come back into the mansion and you first encounter the Hunter. They have that FMV of the thing chasing down the path you just walked, and then this clawed hand opens the door you just walked through, and you can see his beady eyes coming for you out of the darkness... anyway, right at that point in the game, there was a huge crashing sound from my room, about ten feet away, and it literally made me jump. For whatever reason my clock had chosen that exact instant to fall off the wall, heh. How appropriate.

In an FPS, going from a sixteen-player death-fest to a one-on-one match is something. The first time I played through the tournament mode in Unreal Tournament, destroying bots left and right at lightning speed, and then went one-on-one against Xan was very cool. It''s almost eerie being in a world so quiet when you''re used to flak grenades flying and heads rolling. Hearing Xan picking up all the powerups right on the other side of a wall was a little nerve-wracking, especially when you just caught a glimpse of him with invisibility on, a split second before you find yourself with a rocket in your gut, and Xan saying "You die too easily."

-Ironblayde
 Aeon Software

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I have to agree with A. Buza, Alys' death was a pretty emotional scene.The end was quite emotional too, especially when Rune told Chaz they'd never see each other again ... I loved their bickering throughout the whole game.
But the games that affected me most were the Quest for Glory series.The hate for Ad Avis (sp?) (DIE YOU MOTHERF***R), the enormous respect I felt for Erana (and love, in QFG5)...Rakeesh really felt like my mentor, you can't imagine how angry I was when he was poisoned in QFG5...You should really play those games, they RULE.

Runemaster now working on Acronia : Secrets of Magic
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Edited by - runemaster on October 22, 2000 8:45:10 AM
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Oh, I know Squaresoft are such a bunch of copycats. Did the greek tragedies rip off PSIV too?

Tom- Princess Maker (AKA Meat Market- Final Battle) was kinda cool. . .does your therapist know you play these games???. . .j/k My digital smack was Monster Rancher. Its alot like Princess Maker, but you raise beasties instead of women (predating Pokemon, AFAIK ). Now that you mention Princess Maker, I think Monster Rancher got to me more than any other game. When my first Tiger died, I paid the extra grand for a proper funeral, though it had absolutely no ingame consequence. Then I named my next one Toto Jr. after the first. Jeezus. . .this is how fanboys happen. And yes, I. . .I wrote fanfic. . .ok, kill me now.

If you see the Buddha on the road, Kill Him. -apocryphal

Edited by - Anonymous Poster. on October 22, 2000 2:23:47 PM
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That reminds me, the Creatures series (particularly the second game) has this effect. You can become very attached to your Norns as you take care of them, and it''s rather heart-breaking when they finally die. I usually feel this way about first- and second-generation Norns. You get used to the concept after that.

You guys mention Aeris'' death quite a bit, it makes me wonder if I''m the only person in the world who didn''t really care when she was killed. To be perfectly honest, I thought it was pretty damned stupid. I mean, what happened to the eight-billion Pheonix Downs we were carrying ten seconds ago?

This is where plot supercedes reason, something I think should never happen in a good story. But that''s food for another topic, one I''m sure you guys have already discussed in my absence.

I, too, enjoy the adrenaline rush from experiencing tense and frightening situations in video games. I get that a lot from first-person shooters. Not all of you guys like Unreal Tournament as much as I do---well, I don''t think anyone could possibly like it as much as I do.

Still, my point is that sometimes the game gets me really excited. I''m not talking about a pure-white killing high, but the splendor that can only be wrought through awesome gameplay. I''m talking about those freak events when you do something really cool that you could never repeat no matter how hard you tried, and it makes you laugh out loud.

Example: I leaped out of the enemies'' redeemer alcove in Facing Worlds, did a flip and spun around at the same time while switching to the redeemer, and fired at the ground in front of the enemy base, wasting half their team. I actually caught that on a demo.

There is no way you can duplicate that in a story without making it look fabricated. So, I think randomness can provide just as much excitement as story. Not that this is particularly relevant to our discussion...
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Aeris'' death was nothing to me. It was far too much a plot thing you couldn''t avoid. However back in FF3/6 when just after the world ends and Cid dies then Celes attempts suicide in despair... considerably more emotional. Probably what adds to it is that the death could''ve been avoided. This one at least you could say "Where would you get a Pheonix Down on a deserted island just after the appocolyps?"

Another one was in Crono Trigger when one of the characters (Lucca I think) goes back in time on a personal mission to stop her mother from losing her legs. I failed that one and kinda felt bad aboiut it. Couldn''t restore my save point, which I suppose was the real reason.

And yeah, nothing breaks your heasrt like a baby norn dieing.

But stuff like that''s pretty rare. The most common emotional response is, "Oh please God no! Don''t let me die here. The last time I remembered to save the game was before that last major battle before that 10 minute cinematic sequence! That creature was hard enough the first time, and I don''t want to wast my time watching that damn cellebration again!" That''s about the only fear I''ve felt playing a game.

When it comes to Square''s games there''s only really been the two that''s impressed me much. Although FF8 impressed me with some well done cinematic sequences and coreographed battles. But that was more just design. Oh, and just what is PSIV? I thought I was cultured, but I guess I''m just a heathen.
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Phantasy Star is the "Final Fantasy" of Sega. The first PS was released long ago on the old-ass Sega Master System, and it was an award-winning work of art (for its time).

PS II was released on the Genesis in the late eighties. At that time, it was the biggest cart in console history (at six megabits). Phantasy Star fans ate it up like candy. It was an instant classic.

Then PS III was released in Japan, and it boasted a plethora of improvements. I don''t think it every hit the Genesis on our side of the ocean, but I can''t say that for sure. I was never a real Genesis buff.

PS IV made its debut about five or six years ago, and it destroyed its predecessors in size and quality. I particularly like the fact that you can do battle inside your vehicles. Why hasn''t Square done anything like that?

Anyway, that''s a very brief run-down on the PS series.
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PS III did come out in the States, and it was a great game. One cool thing about it was that it spanned three generations, so it ended up that you could finish the game four different ways. I suppose you see multiple endings pretty often these days, but for back then it was great! The only thing I had against it was that the final battle was much too easy... not at all like going up against Dark Force in PS II! That battle took me a long time to win....

-Ironblayde
 Aeon Software

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Having an emotional effect? FF8. Right after the intro where Siefer gave me he scar, I felt like giving him an even bigger one on the chest...after ripping his guts out with my gunblade.

Yeah, Aeris dying would be another scene for me. It wasn''t Aeris that did the trick actually. Seeing Seph killing someone makes me want to kill him.

My all time favorite emotional scene had to be a toss up between FF7 where that Dr. dude wanted Aeris and Red to do each other or where Laguna got a cramp right before talking to whatshername. Why was it emotional? I laughed. Laughing is part of your emotional responses right?
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Hmmm...well, I get emotional pretty easily, but I thought the ending of Planescape Torment was really good. The Blood War had been a backdrop for the entire game, and suddenly, boom! you were in it. In fact, I loved all of PS:T; it was a very well-designed game, IMO.

Aeris'' death was touching indeed, I must say.

In fact, almost every RPG I''ve played has had some emotional effect on me - except for Baldur''s Gate (well, maybe a LITTLE when Gorion dies). Like Fallout 2 - when the fates of each city were recounted, I felt genuinely proud for my accomplishments and really sad where I''d failed.

Anyway...
Trigon



I like food.
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I agree with whoever said the part in FFIII where Celes is about commit suicide is really dramatic.


Another situation that really brang out my emotions was when Stinger from Shadow Madness realizes that the pirate captain he''s been assigned to murder is really his dad, and then he joins his dad and attacks Varley. That wasn''t sad or anything, it just got me really happy and pumped, also.



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I would definately have to say when the lifestream came to counter meteor at the end of FFVII, just as you see Aeris smiling up just before it fades to black.

And when Meryl gets shot in MGS. The music in that game is amazing
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OH YEAH!

The ending of Revenge of Shinobi on the Sega Genesis! Just a crappy ninja-game really, but you could beat the game and still fail to save the girl. It was really cool. I was decently young when I first beat it, and it really got to me. I could never save the girl, and it saddened me to see this ninja character who had saved the world, but lost the one thing that was most important to him.

It''s only now that I''m into design that I realize the failure was the better ending. But would it have been better if it wasn''t MY incompetance that caused his tragedy?
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