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Ketchaval

Passion -Survey

32 posts in this topic

It wouldn''t have had half the punch if you could blame something else for the failure.
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(Not having played it), but what if the inability to choose how to save the world or whether to save it.. was directly attributable to the enemy. Ie. That it was the evil ***''s last evil act against the hero ?
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That would be a different story though, and a different feeling for the player. The feeling of inadequacy was just so right, and it drove you to play again even after you ''beat'' it. That''s just good old game design (and they claim I don''t like the oldies!)
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I''m very touched by two piece of music in the game "Legend of Galactic Heroes 4". I don''t know the composer of these music at the time I play the game but later I found out that those music are composed by classic composer. One of them is Pathetique(movement 2)by Beethoven and the other is Canon by Pachelbel. Before I play this game I don''t know the greatness of Beethoven. I''ve buy some of his music and those music didn''t appeal to me. I''ve also try to appreciate some music of Mozart but they also didn''t arouse my emotion. I come to the silly conclusion that classical music are out-dated and not suitable for modern world. But after I listen to those two music in the game I start to respect Beethoven and classical music.

If anyone want to listen to these music you can find midi version of them in www.prs.net. My opinion is that the midi for canon is nice but the midi for Pathetique that I found in PRS is not so good comparing to the music in the original game.

Some info about the game: the game is made in Japan and is based upon a novel "Legend of Galactic Heroes". It''s a very touching story, especially the part where Reinhart best friend die for him.
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My $.02 on this...

FFVII- Along with Aeris'' death, when ''One Winged Angel'' begins to play while the screen is still dark before the final battle with Sephiroth -great music, great mood setting

Final Fantasy Tactics- The entire game. An unheralded but great game IMO, with one of the best storylines I''ve encountered in any game anywhere.

Doom II, Half-Life- It was never the big monsters that scared me(cyberdemon and face hugger mama excluded), but the little flying skulls and the face huggers seemed to come out of nowhere and ALWAYS made me jump. I still can''t play those games in the dark.

I also agree with the posts for PSIV and Xenogears, and of course, when I returned the goblet to the gold castle for the first time

I leave you with my father''s last words- "Don''t son, that gun is loaded!"
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There was (is, hee hee)a game on the
good old nintendo 8bit a game called
"shingen the ruler" Where you had to
come out of your home provience with
your''e little army and kick the crap
out of all the other proviences till
you own the whole country. The beginning
is really hard because you are far weaker then everyone around
you and they attack right away.

Anyway, I had survived the beginning rounds
of a game and was building up forces.
And the freaking ninjas from Ikko Sect
were all over me! See, there is nothing you
could do about ninja incursions (unless your own
ninja manage to intercept them)
you would just get a report like
"food stollen" or "building blown up" or "someone has started a riot" and it really pulled down your stats and it was hard to build back up.
Anyway like every turn the Ikko Sect ninjas were messing up my stuff. My ninja told me that Ikko sect was behind it all.
so I unallied with the countries betwwen me and Ikko Sect
and took enough troops and supplies for a three provience push.
and I kicked their monk asses.
that was almost ten years ago and I still remember.
That game had great AI.
happy halloween
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Probably the most emotional experience I ever had with a video game was that amazing scene of Aeris'' death, but Lunar Silver Star Story had a much more memorable (and more evident, magical, and overall emotional)theme of love. It has taken me a long time to get over it, and I haven''t even finished the game yet! It may not have the same sweet graphics a Square game may have, but ,oh boy, does it have original style. It really is a great game!
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