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Kylotan

List of free libraries

196 posts in this topic

Hey Kylotan, just wondering why Ika didn't make the cut. I don't see it on the list and it seems pretty useful just not well advertised.

General purpose library (2D w/ 3D accel) -> Ika Engine http://ika.sourceforge.net/

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Seriema, I wasn't just trying to prove a point... it's just that I don't want to add something to the list when I don't really know what it does. I know there's a fine line between game libs and non-game libs, but I've got Boost in there because it offers random number generation and quaternions, for starters. I'm not sure who's going to know they want LOKI unless they have the book, which sort of makes it non-free.

Boder, IKA probably isn't on the list because nobody's told me about it before now.
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Graphics3D - I have only just started using this library, but so far I have been very happy with it. It is quite flexible and light-weight.
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Graphics3D I already have (as G3D, which is the name of the library itself), Sphere and Verge are more game development tools than libraries or frameworks. PTK has just been added though. Thanks!
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PortAudio does cross-platform audio output and input using callbacks. The license is very nice, basically:

Quote:

Plain English Interpretation of the License

The following is a plain English interpretation of the license. This interpretation is not part of the license and has no legal significance. To understand the full legal implications of the license you should consult the license itself.

* You can use PortAudio for free in your projects or applications, even commercial applications.
* You do not have to make your own source available as open-source code just because you used PortAudio.
* Do not take our copyright information out of the PortAudio source code.
* If you fix a bug in PortAudio, please send us the fix.
* You cannot sue us if your program fails because of PortAudio.
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GLFTFont - zlib license

Not exactly a library, but a simple class that bridges freetype and OpenGL allowing drawing of truetype fonts in OpenGL. It's functionality is requested often enough I figured I'd release it.
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Mirage Source isnt listed, 100% source included, license is kinda hybrid.

http://www.miragesource.com
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Don't know if a version 0.01 should make it into your list, but I'm developing an open-source 2D graphics & game SDK in C# with GDI+ and D3D rendering called Endogine:

http://codeproject.com/csharp/Endogine.asp

The framework's structure works 3D worlds as well, but the 3D features will have to wait until version 2.

At the moment it's just copyrighted, no restrictions on the use.
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I see you have not included the API used for xnview, GFL SDK, in the 'loading images' category. It looks nice.
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How about some kind of information showing what languages each library has bindings for? Or better yet, listing all libraries that support a particular language under one section.

For instance:

Python:
-pygame
-pyopengl
-pyode
-twistedmatrix
etc.

That's something I would be interested to see. The existing categories don't have to be broken down necessarily, but it would also be nice to have libraries related by language found in the same place.

At the moment, it seems the list is mainly geared towards C++. Maybe an organizational change would entice more people to list libraries for use with other languages?
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Hello guys,

How about adding the Game Incubator? Game Incubator - http://gi.kamron.net it's a multi-purpose C++ Game engine that you can either use as a all-in-one (for beginner or quick prototyping) or as a grab as you need (for people with existing projects that just want to use some pieces like memory management, error reportting, callstack, sound, networking, real time debugging, or whatever the GI provides).

The license is ZLib (ok for any kind of project).

Plus, I just released the October 2005 SDK :)

Cheers
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Quote:
Original post by Redleaf
How about some kind of information showing what languages each library has bindings for? Or better yet, listing all libraries that support a particular language under one section.

For instance:

Python:
-pygame
-pyopengl
-pyode
-twistedmatrix
etc.

That's something I would be interested to see. The existing categories don't have to be broken down necessarily, but it would also be nice to have libraries related by language found in the same place.

At the moment, it seems the list is mainly geared towards C++. Maybe an organizational change would entice more people to list libraries for use with other languages?


Really, any library that is worth anything is likely to be supported by C/C++ plus any other language where anyone has generated a binding for it. Also, the majority of people are using C/C++ so the utility of tracking the support for other languages probably isn't worth it. And should there be 2 entries for SDL (PyGame is really just an SDL wrapper) or PyODE (which is just ODE wrapped for Python)? At the moment I want to keep it fairly simple and aimed at the core audience.
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Generally that might be true about C++ support, but what about a library like Twisted Matrix? Surely if you were familiar with it you wouldn't say that this library wasn't worth anything to game programming, and it's not easily usable with C++ as far as I can tell.

As far as simplicity goes, that's always a good thing. But isn't the page just a list of links by category anyway? I'm not sure I see how additions of this type would dramatically increase the complexity.

Maybe the core audience needs to be more open-minded, and have a chance of being exposed to more alternatives? A few months ago I would have considered myself part of that core audience, and I consider it a crime that I wasn't seriously exposed to such alternatives earlier. You could be doing others a big favor.
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Quote:
Original post by Redleaf
Generally that might be true about C++ support, but what about a library like Twisted Matrix? Surely if you were familiar with it you wouldn't say that this library wasn't worth anything to game programming, and it's not easily usable with C++ as far as I can tell.


It's not exactly a game development library though, is it? It's a networking library, for a language that isn't very commonly used for game development. I know some of the C++ libraries only have tenuous links to game development, but their inclusion is justified because C++ is significantly harder to use without such libraries. Python has built-in networking that is easy enough to use for most games.

Quote:
As far as simplicity goes, that's always a good thing. But isn't the page just a list of links by category anyway? I'm not sure I see how additions of this type would dramatically increase the complexity.


If I have to add general purpose libraries for uncommon languages, then it's likely to double the size of the list while adding little value to the average (ie. C++) game developer. If I have to start tracking platform availability for each one on top of that, that significantly increases the amount of work I have to do to ensure the list stays up to date. It only takes a reader maybe 2 or 3 minutes to check to see if the library they want is available in the language they use, and in 90% of cases it will be. But for me to do that check myself, for every library, at least once a month or so, will take a lot of time.

Quote:
Maybe the core audience needs to be more open-minded, and have a chance of being exposed to more alternatives? A few months ago I would have considered myself part of that core audience, and I consider it a crime that I wasn't seriously exposed to such alternatives earlier. You could be doing others a big favor.


I agree that the world would be a better place if more people used Python, Ruby, and other high-level languages that make C++ feel like assembly. That's why I got the Scripting Languages forum started here on Gamedev.net. But this game developer library page isn't really the place to promote these things, without diluting the core content and making my life a lot more difficult for little benefit. I might start a separate 'Python Game Libraries' page sometime, if there's demand, and if one doesn't exist already.
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irrlicht--a 3D game engine with a very simple archetecture. You will learn it in one day and begin to code your game.
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AGL is an engine with platform-independent interface for 2D game development. All platform-dependent routines (such as graphics, sounds, file input output, windows messaging, and etc) are already implemented in the AGL. You need to create only game logic while developing the game. Games developed with AGL will run on low-end systems including systems without hardware graphics support (such as i810).

The main feature of the engine is high-level game framework. It contains game states and resources managers, integrated with graphics-rendering subsystem.

Current version supports DirectDraw 7.0, Direct3D 8.0 or OpenGL for displaying graphics and DirectSound for playing sounds.

The latest version of AGL and the documentation can be downloaded from http://www.gamedev2d.com

AGL is free for non-commercial use.

[Edited by - Pavel Dovgaluk on January 15, 2006 12:14:18 PM]
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Object-Oriented Input System (OIS)

OIS is a library for cross-platform input management. It is under the zlib/libpng license. The library supports keyboard, mouse, and joystick/gamepad input. Action mapping is included in one of the demos, and force feedback is planned for the 0.4.0 release (currently in development).

Current issues: There is only support for Win32 and *nix platforms, so if you are a Mac programmer, your help would be appreciated on the project. Also, the project would benefit from documentation writers, who can keep the API reference up to date as well as add a programming guide to help people start to use the library.

This project is a great one, and just needs more eyes to help find bugs, contribute code, and write docs. I am already using it for Meldstar's current project (although the lack of solid documentation means I have to cut and paste from the demo programs with less than spectacular results).
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I like it too, and it might one day replace OGRE's input functionality. Unfortunately it's kinda buggy right now, and apart from demos there's nothing to show how to actually make use of it (same as with the Theora video system for OGRE, from the same author).

Because I suspect that I'm not using it properly, I'd like to see a writer or two adopt the project and create some decent docs on use, and perhaps help maintain the API docs. Also, the project wouldn't hurt from a couple additional coders (especially a Mac programmer).
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