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Kylotan

List of free libraries

196 posts in this topic

HGE, Haaf's Game Engine.
Motto: "Fast and convenient development of high-quality small 2D games without knowing much about technology."

Stricly 2D-oriented, simple, technically advanced, completely and clearly documented, and (recently) open source.
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Quote:
Original post by oscinis
HGE, Haaf's Game Engine.
Motto: "Fast and convenient development of high-quality small 2D games without knowing much about technology."

Stricly 2D-oriented, simple, technically advanced, completely and clearly documented, and (recently) open source.


It's added already, and re-requested about 6 times.
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Can I have some question?
What is the best (or the most popular) 3D engine in that list?
Is ORGE good enough for building a 3D RPG?
What is the best 3D engine for building a 3D RPG?

Thank you all.
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There's also Open Physic Abstraction Layer, a very easy to use wrapper for ODE, more engines in the future.
http://opal.sourceforge.net/
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Quote:
Original post by g8minhquan
Can I have some question?
What is the best (or the most popular) 3D engine in that list?
Is ORGE good enough for building a 3D RPG?
What is the best 3D engine for building a 3D RPG?

Thank you all.


I don't know all the engines in that list, but Ogre will definitely suit your needs. It's not limited to any particular style of game, you can use it for anything. I've been using it for a while without any problem
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A few minor additions made. I hope Mozilla users appreciate the altered layout, too.

Any comments on the page, and how it could better serve you?
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This list has saved me a lot of messing about.
I saw a link to this 2d physics library (using ODE) in the maths forum - Flatland. The demos are quite good, but sadly it's unusable with VC6 in its current form.
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Hi! I was wondering if you'd be interested in adding DyConnect to your list. Here's the link:
http://www.junction.bafsoft.com#dyconnect

DyConnect provides UDP support in the form of a socket wrapper, but it's mainly geared towards TCP/IP programming. I tried to make TCP/IP networking as high level as possible while still being general purpose. That is to say, there are no hidden DyConnect-specific messages being exchanged, and you could use DyConnect together with a non-DyConnect program.

You don't have to deal with sockets, buffers or threads yourself, and get the advantages of multi-threaded networking logic. But at the end of the day you're still sending and parsing bytes of data.

It's released under the zlib license, making it free to distribute.
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Hi guys

Maybe it would be worth adding SDL_Config to "Filesystems, persistence, and format parsing"... what do you think? :-) It's LGPL.
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Hello, is there anybody here...? :-) It's been almost a week, and SDL_Config still isn't on the list. If it's not worth beeing there, just say that, and I'll shut up.
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Koshmaar, perhaps you could PM Kylotan about your post here. He probably doesn't check this topic regularly anymore.

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Anything to say or contribute? Contact me at gdlibs@kylotan.eidosnet.co.uk. Gamedev.net users can also send me a private message.
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PMs are best, although to be fair I only update the list monthly anyway. Expect the next update to be in about an hour. Thanks!
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Anything to say or contribute? Contact me at gdlibs@kylotan.eidosnet.co.uk. Gamedev.net users can also send me a private message.


Ups, haven't seen this, sorry.

Quote:
PMs are best, although to be fair I only update the list monthly anyway. Expect the next update to be in about an hour. Thanks!


Thanks, it's there! Yay :-)
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The list on this page is getting rather long, and most of the things I do not know much about. I see that the page uses PHP. Might I suggest a way for developers to rate each library on a number of criteria? For instance: ease of use, ease of learning, features, etc. This way such a list will appear less daunting.

EDIT: Might I also suggest more descriptive descriptions. For instance, what base dependencies a library is built on (i.e. A 3D graphics library which uses OpenGL for rendering, or a sound library which uses libogg. etc.).
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I don't want to introduce ratings as I don't want to marginalise the less common libraries based on popularity and subjective opinion.

As for longer descriptions, it's a nice idea but collecting that data is quite awkward, especially across multiple platforms.
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Boo is an object oriented statically typed programming language for the .NET Framework with a python inspired syntax. It uses an MIT/BSD license agreement.
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CLanlib is now (version 0.8 an later) published under the terms of the Clanlib license....you can see it on their website.......
can you update that ?????????
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libMikMod is a audio module player and library supporting many formats, including mod, s3m, it, and xm. Originally a player for MS-DOS, MikMod has been ported to other platforms, such as Unix, Macintosh, BeOS, and Java. libMikMod falls under the LGPL agreement.

Thank you goes to zangetsu, in this thread, for pointing it out to me.
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People can use my 2D side scroller game engine JEngine SSE (still under development) for creating their own game. It is released under LGPL and currently includes Lua scripting, multiplayer networking, GUI, editor and much more. See http://jengine.homedns.org
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The list includes IrrlichtNX, but should include Lightfeather instead. As you'll see if you try clicking on the lick for it, IrrlichtNX redirects to Lightfeather. Lightfeather is the next evolution of what was IrrlichtNX and has moved farther away from its Irrlicht roots with a completely redone render pipeline.
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Quote:
Original post by Electron100
Lightfeather is the next evolution of what was IrrlichtNX and has moved farther away from its Irrlicht roots with a completely redone render pipeline.


So, what have they done with the old engine? Why do people throw things out half-way and start again? And why do they discard all mention of what they used to use? Grr.

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IrrlichtNX began life as an Irrlicht fork that accepted patches. The original goal was to keep compatibility with Irrlicht.
After some time, we decided that a major rewrite of the rendering pipeline was needed. Thus began IrrlichtNX++. As the rewrite proceeded, a decision was made to change the name as the engine had much less in common with Irrlicht than it used to. The old engine was not discarded, it was considerably restructured and revised.
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So it's still somewhat based on Irrlicht then? Wouldn't it be respectful to have some mention of that somewhere on the site? Still, I'll update the link on my page soon.
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