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trevaaar

Fading the screen

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How do I fade the screen to or from black with Managed Direct3D 9. I am relatively new to Direct3D (and C#, most of my previous programming was Java and C++) so example code would be appreciated.

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Greetings!

I was wondering how do they manage that. I never implemented it, but I believe you create a QUAD with 4 RHW (2D vertices) and change the ALPHA value in time. At the beggining it is transparent and it fades to white where it becomes opaque i believe.

I there is a better way, let me know!

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Here's the code I wrote, but it doesn't appear to work for me. If there's something wrong with it or if it needs me to set some renderstates beforehand or something, please tell me.

using System;
using Microsoft.DirectX;
using Microsoft.DirectX.Direct3D;

namespace foo
{
public enum FadeType
{
FadeIn,
FadeOut
}

public class Fader
{
private static VertexBuffer Verts;

private FadeType Type;
private int EndTime;
private int StartTime;

public Fader(FadeType type, int duration)
{
Type = type;
StartTime = Environment.TickCount;
EndTime = StartTime + duration;
}

public static void Initialize()
{
Verts = new VertexBuffer(typeof(CustomVertex.Transformed), 4, Graphics.Dev, Usage.WriteOnly, CustomVertex.Transformed.Format, Pool.Default);
Verts.Created += new EventHandler(OnVertexBufferCreated);
OnVertexBufferCreated(Verts, null);
}

private static void OnVertexBufferCreated(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
CustomVertex.Transformed[] v = new CustomVertex.Transformed[4];
v[0].X = 0;
v[0].Y = 0;
v[0].Z = 0.5f;
v[0].Rhw = 1;
v[1].X = 799;
v[1].Y = 0;
v[1].Z = 0.5f;
v[1].Rhw = 1;
v[2].X = 0;
v[2].Y = 599;
v[2].Z = 0.5f;
v[2].Rhw = 1;
v[3].X = 799;
v[3].Y = 599;
v[3].Z = 0.5f;
v[3].Rhw = 1;
GraphicsStream gs = Verts.Lock(0, 0, 0);
gs.Write(v);
Verts.Unlock();
}

public static void Terminate()
{
Verts.Dispose();
}

public bool Finished
{
get
{
if(Environment.TickCount > EndTime)
return true;
else
return false;
}
}

public void Draw()
{
if(Finished)
return;
Material m = new Material();
if(Type == FadeType.FadeIn)
m.DiffuseColor = new ColorValue(0.0f, 0.0f, 0.0f, 1.0f - ((float)Environment.TickCount - (float)StartTime) / ((float)EndTime - (float)StartTime));
else
m.DiffuseColor = new ColorValue(0.0f, 0.0f, 0.0f, ((float)Environment.TickCount - (float)StartTime) / ((float)EndTime - (float)StartTime));
Graphics.Dev.Material = m;
Graphics.Dev.SetStreamSource(0, Verts, 0);
Graphics.Dev.VertexFormat = CustomVertex.Transformed.Format;
Graphics.Dev.DrawPrimitives(PrimitiveType.TriangleStrip, 0, 2);
}
}
}

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There are many options for doing this. In one of my projects I just faded the lighting down to black. This is obviously not a reasonable solution in many situations, but the point is that if you can't get one method to work, ponder on it and find another.

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