Sign in to follow this  

physics class.

This topic is 4726 days old which is more than the 365 day threshold we allow for new replies. Please post a new topic.

If you intended to correct an error in the post then please contact us.

Recommended Posts

Physics implemented into games is quite basic, because obviously you dont need to calculate how many joules of energy it takes to melt a block of ice, or the expansion of a solid due to the temperature of a scene, for example.
Game physics are simple in physics terms.

Taking an introductory physics class at even the high school level will teach you all the science you need to know: Movement (momentum (inertia), acceleration, velocity), Friction (Static and kinetic), Rotational dynamics (torque, etc).. all learned in very basic physics classes. It's alot harder implementing them into code than it is just to learn the science.

You could learn the physics on your own time and not worry about tests and homework:P Take linear algebra and/or a calculus course

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Well, I'm making a game that is so elite that it does have to calculate the joules of energy to melt a block of ice, etc. The guns have realistic barrel expansion when they heat up as well. I had to take three years of college physics to reach this level of understanding though. I'm integrating the uncertainty principle at the moment, and hope to introduce entanglement later on. The real beauty is the relativistic effects; in multiplayer, different players perceive different occurances of the same event based on their positions and velocities. It's just great, and drives noobs crazy. Anyway, I highly recommend studying physics, so that when the time comes to simulate each molecule and atom in a game individually (instead of having to fake it now, obviously. I don't even account for the strong or weak atomic forces right now!) you will know exactly what to do. Good luck in your endeavors!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
lol @ n0ob! That is the most over the top thing I've seen :)

MikeyO is right though, physics in games often involves quite alot of cheating and fudge-factors in order to get things to be more fun. Start off with a simple class and if you enjoy it, try and implement some physics.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Basic linear and angular mechanics (possibly a little optics) would definitely help implement a realistic physics engine. A basic introductory physics class should cover this. Though this only matters if you ever try to develop a realistic physics engine.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Those undergraduate physics classes are going to be fantastic for learning the core laws of physics, and I recommend them.

One thing that undergraduate college physics classes don't generally go into is the generalized 3D nature of the physics in many games. There such a vast amount of general physics to be covered in these classes, there just is not enough time to spend too much time dealing with the geometry of the problems.

For example, collision detection between particles in that first physics class won't be presented as though the particles are approaching each other in general 3D space. They'll be assumed to be traveling along a line, say the x direction, with velocity (in real life a vector) represented as just a scalar.

Its straightforward to make the jump from undergraduate physics (1D and the occasional 2D) to the generalized game world (3D) IF you have a solid understanding of vector and matrix arithmetic, transformation matrices, and the concept of different spaces/coordinate systems.

Advanced undergraduate classes (junior and senior level) and graduate classes in engineering dynamics will talk about things in 3D.

That said, in addition to a first physics class, I strongly recommend that you immerse yourself in learning as much as you can about geometry and transformations.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This topic is 4726 days old which is more than the 365 day threshold we allow for new replies. Please post a new topic.

If you intended to correct an error in the post then please contact us.

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Sign in to follow this