• Announcements

    • khawk

      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
nx02nx02

Movies about programming?

37 posts in this topic

Quote:
Original post by nx02nx02
I just thought it would be kind of neat to watch a couple movies about programmers lives, their jobs, careers, etc. How they got there, what college they went to.


Hmmm, let's see. What has Hollywood taught us about programmers and computers?

-- Programmers either have super-high-tech and exciting jobs because they work at undisclosed locations in Nevada or an orbital space station; or they have mind-numbing slave-wage labor, on a par with telemarketing.

-- Programming requires only as much skill as typing on a keyboard. All computers have built-in natural language parsers and advanced Bayesian heuristic systems to deduce exactly what you mean. Thus, there is no ambiguity about which files you want when typing "recover files" to retrieve clandestinely deleted files, or "override system" to ignore those pesky "ACCESS DENIED" security warnings.

-- Some monitors are sufficiently bright to project an image of the screen onto your face.

-- All laptops have incredible three-dimensional graphics capabilities rivaling that of supercomputers, and no fewer than five or six GPS/satellite imaging uplinks that are able to pinpoint any location in the world and zoom in on it with a resolution on the order of centimeters per pixel. Some laptops also have phone-tracing capabilities and (built-in) powerful wireless antennas, to boot.

-- All computers display photorealistic 3D simulations without batting an eye, and typically have CPU speeds on the order of several petahertz.

-- Even the most outdated modems and disk drives are capable of data transmission exceeding several gigabytes per second. Exception: If time is of the essence, the rate of transmission will invariably slow down to pre-1970s download speeds.

-- All passwords take three guesses or fewer to crack by brute force. Failing that, the protagonist will be carrying a device which conveniently plugs into any port imaginable and "auto-cracks" the password. This latter solution is more commonly used on devices whose explicit purpose is authorization (e.g. security keypads or retinal scanners).

-- Important or sensitive information is always stored on a desktop. Such information is typically labeled in a prominent manner, by naming the folder or file something like "SECRET DOCUMENTS" or "ICARUS PROJECT FILES" or "EMPLOYEE RECORDS". This is always done in inch-high capital letters with a bold font.

-- All computers are connected to all other computers in the world, regardless of their location. Thus it is possible, from an isolated outpost in the Siberia wastelands, to "hack" into a nuclear power plant's coolant control pipes and cause a meltdown, even if the plant is halfway across the globe.
1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
disclaimer : might have gotten confused with another film ;).

<edit :: and the girl was hot. just thought i'd mention that.


No that was antitrust, and the girl was the very yummy Rachael Leigh Cook.

cheers
sam.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
Original post by Rhaal
Quote:
Original post by Crispy
I can't believe Swordfish hasn't been mentioned yet...

Because it's not about programming.


My bad - you're right: he's using a multi-monitor 3D GUI to drag-and-drop together a worm that appears in the form of a mineral crystal with some connectors desperately trying to float away into the void. I guess that won't qualify as programming, though.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
Original post by Ainokea
And as always hollywood is always correct.


See my previous post.

If you don't know how code breaking is done (in Hollywood, khm...), watch that Naked Gun movie.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just saw Pirates of Silicon Valley.
It was pretty interesting, I would recommend it.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
These are the ones in my collection:

-Hackers
-Hackers 2 (I don't think this was released in the US. I got it from a friend. It is about the life of Kevin Mitnick before he was caught. Very interesting)
-Anti Trust
-Pirates of Silicon Valley
-Triumph of the Nerds
-The Video Game Revolution
-Revolution OS (this is a documentary (albeit a very baised documentary) about Linux. You can get it on ThinkGeek)
-Wargames

Other technology-esque/geeky flicks I have:

-Matrix
-Sneakers
-Swordfish

I'm sure there are a couple others. And even though I don't own it (and I would say that people should NOT own it), I think every developer should at least watch "The Net" with Sandra Bullock, to at least have things to laugh at your entire career.

Another one that I desperately want to see but haven't yet is "Once upon Atari" which is available on DVD from ThinkGeek. It is about the rise and fall of the Atari brand.

Although I must say that I prefer some of my books instead:

-Masters of Doom
-Snow Crash
-Cryptonomicon
-Microserfs
-The Diamond Age
-The Difference Engine
-Neuromancer

and on and so forth...
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
Original post by Tha_HoodRat
Pi


Ah yes, Pi, more like progrhammering at some point, but good, weird movie noneless.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
Original post by kSquared
Hmmm, let's see. What has Hollywood taught us about programmers and computers?
And lest we forget the classic from Independence Day, vastly superior alien technology:
1. is obviously binary
2. is fully compatible with the Macintosh
3. lacks security of any kind
4. is easily understood by humans (who speak English)

Yeah, Hollywood + computers = implausibilies abound
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I just watched Anti-trust and I now I think I have seen the most hilarious movie ever, it is so obviously about Microsoft.

EDIT: Its every geeks dream for that to happen.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
Original post by Ainokea
I just watched Anti-trust and I now I think I have seen the most hilarious movie ever, it is so obviously about Microsoft.

EDIT: Its every geeks dream for that to happen.


I love the line near the start where the billionaire guy says something like "mines much more advacned than bill gates", just to try to seperate it a bit.

Is hackers the doco about the guy that created the wank virus?
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0