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what is RM or Immidiate mode

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I"m sure this question comes up all the time, but since the search is disabled. What is the difference between Immidiate mode and retained mode. I just want to jump in and start learning the hardcore one. I don't want to start of with "the easy version" and then have to learn something else to do the more complex stuff. Right now, I'm interested in making 2d games with direct3D, since aparently DirectDraw is no good at doing basic things such as rotation. Thanks

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They're both anachronisms. Today, all DirectX Graphics operations are effectively conducted in Immediate Mode.

Google or search MSDN for more (archived) details.

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I was just quickly glancing over a tutorial in Immediate mode and notice the author saying "Create the DirectDraw and the Direct3D objects, required for rendering".

Is directDraw still used in direct3D programming? Does the new directX9 uses directdraw to help render the scene as well? If I learn Immediate mode tutorials for directX8, can I still use them in DirectX9?

So many questions I wanna ask.

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Quote:
Original post by Oluseyi
They're both anachronisms. Today, all DirectX Graphics operations are effectively conducted in Immediate Mode.

Google or search MSDN for more (archived) details.


kubicon - Oluseyi is right - if you look at that first article on RM -
Quote:
...
For true speed and all the latest features, learn Immediate Mode.

You should note the fact that there are no further additions planned by Microsoft for Retained Mode. They are focusing on Immediate mode for all future enhancements. Retained mode will still be usable, but Microsoft are [I think] hoping that it will disappear within the next few years. Baring this in mind, this section of my page is unlikely to be updated as often as the immediate mode tutorials.


I do not know all the workings of DX - take a look in the DirectX forum for specific issues realting it - but I do not think DDraw is used in D3D - well I know in 9c it is not. If you upgrade to 9C sdk - you cannot use Visual Studio 6, as a heads up.

All code from DX1 is compatible with DX9 - its just depracted and stuff - the new functions offer *hopefully* better performance and ease of use. Take a look here at NeHe's site for a beginning D3D tutorial someone uploaded. It is very useful.

One thing I have to ask is what type of rotation are you talking about in 2D? I would think that ddraw would have everything you need for 2D - but then again I am not a DX programmer yet.

Anyways best of luck! I hope this helps some.

- Drew

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yes Oluseyi is right because if you make a d3d app in the normal way ie not going back to ddraw or something then you'll be in Immediate mode, immediate & retained mode aren't really issues any more, as long as you are using at least directx 8.

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Hi,

Going back in time to DX3 and DX5 there was something called Retained Mode. Basically, it was a simple engine designed to cover the nightmare behind the DX3 design.

Anyway that nightmare passed and now DX has a simple and elegant design and Retained Mode has evolved to a companion library that is no longer an 'engine' but just helper functions that make your life easier.

So, my advice, dont go RM. Also dont go DDraw. Just get into D3D. COnsider that Longhorn (next Windows Release) will only run on 3D accelerator cards.

Luck!
Guimo

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