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[.net] placing images in bin folder: what is the default folder of the application.

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Hi, I have created an image processing application in c# but the problem is that the image that i am displaying as a default image in the application window requires me to give full path of the of the folder where it is placed. So i placed the image in bin folder of the application so that it can be accessed irrespective of the computer i m running my application. but it is not working as well. Is there any way i can solve this problem. Please help me. Thanx a lot, bye.

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use the path "ImageName.bmp" or whatever extension. That should grab it from the default place. You are compiling it and running it from the IDE right? If so, that should work. If you are running it out of the debug or release folder then you need to put the image in either of those folders.

Are you sure your image processing is correct? You might have an error and that might not be showing it.

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Actually my application loads to types of files. first it loads .jpg files and secondly another file whose format is defined by me. Initially the default .jpg file loads correctly but when i load my own defined file which is not an image file and is used for some other purpose, the default .jpg file starts giving an exception. but when i change my application by giving the absolute path of the .jpg file this problem does not occur. I think that when i load my other file the default folder changes from the bin folder to the folder in which that other file is placed and hence an exception is raised. But i dont know how to solve this problem.

Thanx again

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SetCurrentDirectory(LPCTSTR lpPathName);
and DWORD GetCurrentDirectory(DWORD nBufferLength,LPTSTR lpBuffer);

http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/en-us/fileio/base/getcurrentdirectory.asp


http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/default.asp?url=/library/en-us/fileio/base/setcurrentdirectory.asp

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First, always use full paths. This way you never lose track of a file. Never assume a current directory!

Second, the path of the application's executable can easily be retrieved by using: System.Windows.Forms.Application.ExecutablePath

Third: always use the methods of the System.IO.Path class to manipulate paths: Combine, ChangeExtention, GetFileNameWithoutExtention etc.

Cheers

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Use Application.StartupPath. This is the path your exe is in, so it will always be accurate. The function below will take something like "ImageFile.bmp" and turn it into the full path (like "C:\Projects\MyProject\bin\Debug\ImageFile.bmp").


public String GetFullFilePath(String FileName)
{
return( System.IO.Path.Combine(Application.StartupPath, FileName) );
}

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Quote:
Original post by DaWanderer
Use Application.StartupPath. This is the path your exe is in, so it will always be accurate. The function below will take something like "ImageFile.bmp" and turn it into the full path (like "C:\Projects\MyProject\bin\Debug\ImageFile.bmp").

*** Source Snippet Removed ***

Be careful if you're using this when you call programs from other programs. For instance, if you call program B in directory C:\D2 from program A in directory C:\D1, StartupPath will report "C:\D1" when called from inside program B.

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I haven't tested this thoroughly, but I'm guessing if you set up a new AppDomain with the correct path ("C:\D2" in this case), then Application.StartupPath will report the correct path. Were you referring to creating a new Process and executing program B that way?

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Quote:
Original post by ernow
First, always use full paths. This way you never lose track of a file. Never assume a current directory!
Cheers


Unless you set it yourself using Environment.CurrentDirectory. It also might help your understanding of this problem to examine this variable near where you are having problems.

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