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differences in the versions of Visual C++ .net 2005

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there is a starard version, a professal version, and an enterprise version. just wondering what the differences are. i'm using VC++ 6.0 pro, and thought it might be time to upgrade it. thanks.

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there is a starard version, a professal version, and an enterprise version.

Bare in mind that the only commercial version currently out is '2003' (aka v7.1), the '2005' (aka v8.0) release is still in beta testing.

Product Overview for Visual Studio .NET 2003 might be of interest, or the Visual Studio .NET 2003 Feature Comparison Chart summarises everything nicely.

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i'm using VC++ 6.0 pro, and thought it might be time to upgrade it.

VC6 has pretty much had its lifetime now, so you probably won't be doing yourself a disservice by upgrading. Although, might be best to wait for VStudio2005 which is just round the corner (as opposed to the current 2003 edition).

hth
Jack

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The only difference that I have been able to determine between the different versions is that as you progress from Standard->Professional->Enterprise you gain more features with the IDE/compiler.

For example VS 2003 Standard doesn't feature an optimising compiler whereas Professional, Enterprise editions do, you also get SQL debugging capabilities. From my experience messing around with the 2005 Enterprise beta one of the new features you gain from Profession->Enterprise is the ability to target architectures other than x86.

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Original post by jollyjeffers
VC6 has pretty much had its lifetime now, so you probably won't be doing yourself a disservice by upgrading.


Unless he is developing in Procedural-C.

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Unless he is developing in Procedural-C.

Suppose so, but my general opinion is that if you've got the tools to built what you want (i.e. if you're happy with VC6, the older PSDK and older DXSDK) then its still (and always will be) a perfectly valid tool.

Just that it's now no longer officially supported by Microsoft (not 100% sure on this) and the number of new libraries/SDK's that aren't compatable with it (e.g. DX-SDK, most of Boost from what I read)... So if you want to play with those sorts of things then VC6 has definitely run its course [smile].

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one of the new features you gain from Profession->Enterprise is the ability to target architectures other than x86.

I thought you could get that with the "processor pack" on the previous "pro" editions?

I've always worked on the general assumption that large scale multi-programmer projects benefit from the enterprise package, whereas most small teams and definitely solo efforts are ok with the pro-level. Due to the lack of an optimizing compiler, I've never considered the standard editions [smile]

Jack

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This topic is 4716 days old which is more than the 365 day threshold we allow for new replies. Please post a new topic.

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