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Madster

Control innovation. It's here. (contains link)

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There was a thread about controller innovation once here. Many things were discussed, and some were really far-fetched. It seems now that the most far-fetched things could actually be plausible with a little innovation on a recent innovation. I'm talking about the addition of an infra-red per-pixel distance measuring thingie to the EyeToy. a PS2 may use 20% of its CPU to do this, but our PCs can do the job perfectly =D Sounds so good that your brain will bleed. Grab some towels and click this baby: http://www.gamespy.com/articles/584/584744p1.html?fromint=1 uh and get back here and comment damnit! Me myself i'm drooling about the skeletal bits edit: italics were changed, in the excitement i mangled my english =) edit 2: Still don't know how to make links. [Edited by - Madster on February 9, 2005 11:58:26 PM]

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Very interesting indeed. I wonder in what ways these new control schemes could allow better man-machine interaction, but I'm sure they will.

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The per pixel movement was interesting but I am not sure how you would run around a virtual world. Unless you are on a tread mill, running and turning would be difficult. Even worse, you would always need to look at the screen, so peeking around the corner may be more difficult/less intuitive as they make it seem. If this was combined with vr glasses and an open gymfloor, it could be interesting.

The PSP lens was an interesting idea.

I doubt that PC will be able to handle the processor load any better, but maybe someone will start making chips/boards built around these applications.

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Experimentation with these kinds of things on PC's is easy to do with tools like ARToolKit.
I wrote a small paper about using ARToolKit for applications as the author of the article mentioned in his last paragraph. Many other examples can be easily found if you use google with keywords such as "augmented reality", "augmented gaming" etc.

[Edited by - Seraphim on May 12, 2007 3:28:56 PM]

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Video of a demo of current 'augmented reality' ('AR') technology here. (Note: Windows Media required.)

I don't know about you, but _I'm_ impressed. I fully expect to see that stuff on TV in fairly short order, but it is also suggestive of some interesting game concepts.

Regards,

--
Sean Timarco Baggaley


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Quote:
Original post by stimarco

Video of a demo of current 'augmented reality' ('AR') technology here. (Note: Windows Media required.)

I don't know about you, but _I'm_ impressed. I fully expect to see that stuff on TV in fairly short order, but it is also suggestive of some interesting game concepts.

Regards,

--
Sean Timarco Baggaley


There is a problem with your link. I tried to fix it to no avail(above). Part of the problem could be my corporate firewall.

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Anyone who's interested in the head-tracking mentioned on the first page of that article might like to know that such a system is already available for the PC. Check it out here.

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That's cool. I remember reading an article in Edge a few months ago about how people hadn't really innovated with the EyeToy... naturally, I took that as a challenge ^_^ and came up with a game design... perhaps stuff like this will make it easier to identify the grab-type motions that my design requires. Which would be cool.

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That's mind-blowingly cool. I wonder how hard it would be to synchronize the per-pixel system with an old-fashioned 3D "Muppetvision" display. If you could calibrate them properly, the Minority Report system would be a snap. You get some retro-reflective gloves and some 3D glasses, and you're in business.

More relevant to us, perhaps, would be the economical and simple "home-grown mo-cap" that would become available to hobbyist game designers. No more endless tweaking in Meshwork or Milkshape to get the character to grab an item from the ground; no more jerky punch animations; no more hours of research to figure out how to get an arm to reach like and arm and not like a bucket truck.

I'm really excited about this technology.

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In reverse order!

about modeling: I'm afraid there would have to be a lot of tweaking left to do. Mainly because of occlusion, once a marker is occluded, there's no way of finding it again (and still keep track of which marker is which). Most image-based motion capture... thingies use more than one camera to this effect. 3 seems to be the minimum.

superpig, about that grabbing: the article mentions the dude sqeezing the device. detecting a 'grab' motion requires multiple markers to be tracked, and is needlessly complex and unreliable. Better use a trigger. However, distance can be used as a trigger too. Your design sounds great btw. (you might want to track amplitude of the microphone input, kind of "i think i heard something" versus "what the hell was that!!")

plasmadog: TrackIR looks interesting! I'm reading about it, and watching the demos. Groovy.

Thermodynamics: you don't really need to turn around fully, your movements don't have to be in 1:1 scale. It's only another control imput, like a mouse (for marker tracking). And about PC's... they're definitely over PS2 range nowadays, what takes 20% in a PS2 shouldn't take much on a PC. Still a decent amount though, but much less.

ToohrVyk: i couldn't find how to make links clickable :/

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you misread the article. The ps2 uses 20% when doing head/object tracking. The per pixel infra-red distance measuring is not done using the eye-toy. That is another device entirly. the eyetoy is a standard usb webcam, nothing special.

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That is cool. Now all I need to do is move some furniture and wait. I'm glad I picked up that wooden sword now. This would be a lot of fun in hack and slash games. The only problem is that there's nothing for the sword to connect to(as in hit). Any ideas on how to overcome that?

My first thought is to create a standard fighting dummy with a few but well selected motions to be used by a majority of the games.

This could definitely bring back home light gun games. There could also be a home version of my favorite arcade game(it was a quick draw target game using a light gun and photosensitive targets, I was exceptionally fast and accurate). The game required the gun to be in a holder before it would start so now the camera can do that job.

We could have fighting games in the first person perspective(no really, have you seen tv sizes these days)!

Imagine all the bending you'll have to do to play a Zelda game! How would you play a kibry game though?

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heck, you could have lightgun minus the gun. Point with your finger. Boom! (hey, dragonball Z style fights.. thats not too far off! )
I sure wish the aim/shoot genre gets a revival. It was hella fun.

About feedback, well, force feedback! get a lil whirr when you made contact. I doubt they would work with fast motion anyway, so don't expect fighting to come anytime soon. The looking around aspect is what I look forward to right now (after watching the TrackIR videos.... damn, racing looks sweet)

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I just realized this could also bring back VR gear(except for all the bumping into furniture). If the game is tracking your movements, it doesn't have to display stuff on a tv at all! The only problem is to figure out an elegant way to move in a greater range than your living room allows.

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It's all about amplifying your movements and tricking you into doing stuff.
I read this study years ago that if the VR App turns slowly, you won't notice and you'll turn yourself to keep the picture steady. They did this to keep pepople in a CAVE (VR stuff) from looking at the missing wall. They also amplified the turns, so they could do 180º turns without turning completely.

TrackIR amplifies head motion. I can imagine gaming in the future by just doing dreamy motions of what the virtual character does.

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