Sign in to follow this  
King_DuckZ

OpenGL A compiler for DirectX9 please?

Recommended Posts

I just discovered that DirectX9 SDK has no longer support for Visual Studio 6. I already found a thread on gamedev using Google, so I don't wanna start a clash now, but I'd like to hear from few people if you would ever develop a game using a managed language such as VB.net or C#. I mean, the .net environment is clearly for managerial softwares, why should they force me to migrate towards the .net? I will never mess my pc up installing all the unrequired services, languages, frameworks and libraries that Visual Studio.net installs. Thus, my question: can you suggest me another C++ environment which is not Microsoft? I'd like it to have support for DX9, but if it doesn't, it's the same, I'll just stick to OpenGL. Just point it out if you post a reply, please :) Bill Bill Bill... If you read me - or anyone related to you does - pick your framework, roll it up, and stick it up in [censored]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
It no longer supports it, but I'm not sure if it will not work, it just might.. And also, no one is forcing you to use D3D9.0c, you can always stick with previous versions.

You can always download the free .NET2003 compiler(-only), or the .NET2005 Express Beta (something like that). Good luck!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
It doesn't work. I got many linker errors, and searching the net I learned that errors are due to the lack of support.
Tell me about this free .net compiler... How does it work? I mean, how can I do debugging, is it possible or it's just for compiling code you know it's working?

About the .net2005 beta, well, I think previous versions are buggy enough, a beta would cause my pc to explode. I still remember an error on .net 2003, the whose description was "Catastrophic error!" and nothing more... Definitely, I will never install that environment on my comp.

PS: Don't misunderstood, I generally like Microsoft, and I don't mean to start a poll to decide how much gay Bill is. I just got mad because MS is forcing me towards languages that looks more like a script to me. I don't understand why they're wasting so many efforts to get DX to work with .net scripts... Did you see the tutorials for C# in the DX SDK? It's scandalous...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
Original post by King_DuckZ
I just got mad because MS is forcing me towards languages that looks more like a script to me. Did you see the tutorials for C# in the DX SDK? It's scandalous...


From what I understand, C# has little to do with microsoft itself. C# and .Net are different in that C# is a programming language whereas .Net is actually a framework that Microsoft developed that changes the way windows sets kernel-mode permissions and system calls behind the scenes (the Windows API). I've heard rumors to the effect that Microsoft will be using only .Net in it's next version of Windows codename "Longhorn" and have everything running MFC and previous actually running in an emulator.

Long story short, I've been using .Net Studio 2005 Suite (the full version, thanks to my boss), DirectX and C++ all at the same time. It works wonderfully and the debugger is priceless! I'd say go for it, get the free version. Even though it's Beta it's suprisingly stable for a Microsoft product.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Well, if you say so, I think I can try it as a last resource ;) Speaking of the .net framework, I hope what you said about Longhorn is just a rumor. I will leave Windows as soon as they leave the PE format, or as soon as they decide to bung a garbage collector in every line of code I write.

Btw thanks for the comment about .net studio 2005. If it turns out to be as good as Visual Studio 6 was, I'll be glad to install it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
Original post by King_DuckZ
I just got mad because MS is forcing me towards languages that looks more like a script to me.


Just because they support Visual Studio .net does not mean they are moving to a scripting language. You still can use C++ with the .net environment. Not sure if that's what you meant, but they are not forcing you to use VB .net or C# .net, just the environment.

I currently have Visual Studio 6 installed at home and I can compile directx9 code just fine. Maybe you didn't set up directx correctly or didn't add some .lib files or the path to the include or lib folders? Just a thought.

- Kevin

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
Original post by King_DuckZ
I just discovered that DirectX9 SDK has no longer support for Visual Studio 6. I already found a thread on gamedev using Google, so I don't wanna start a clash now, but I'd like to hear from few people if you would ever develop a game using a managed language such as VB.net or C#.
I mean, the .net environment is clearly for managerial softwares, why should they force me to migrate towards the .net? I will never mess my pc up installing all the unrequired services, languages, frameworks and libraries that Visual Studio.net installs. Thus, my question: can you suggest me another C++ environment which is not Microsoft? I'd like it to have support for DX9, but if it doesn't, it's the same, I'll just stick to OpenGL. Just point it out if you post a reply, please :)

Bill Bill Bill... If you read me - or anyone related to you does - pick your framework, roll it up, and stick it up in [censored]


It has nothing to do with the .net framework. Visual Studio 6 is a very old programming tool that simply is phased out. They now only support the Visual studio .net programming tool. There really is not anything strange about it at all. You can pick up an older 9.0c SDK version in the MSDN archive (do it now before that too is phased out. You'll find it in the one of extras I believe) That should solve your problem. I think you must accept that this is the end of the road for VS6, and that it is time to either upgrade to a new version or change to another programming tool.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hmm. I wonder. If you ever used Intel C++, it installs itself in the compiler settings in the VS6 menus. If you knew how that worked, I can imagine you could write a plugin to use VS 2003 C++ compiler (free one) with the VS6 editor. You just click on the compiler and than everything will now compile with the new VS 2003 compiler. But does the VS 2003 compiler have a debugger you could plugin to VS6?



Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
You seem to be pretty confused about what Visual Studio .NET is. It's not just for .NET / managed code or for VB.NET and C#. The native C++ compiler in Visual Studio 2003 is much better than the one in VS6 - more standards compliant and much better at optimizing code as well as fully supporting newer instruction sets like SSE 1/2/3. The debugger is also improved as is the STL implementation that ships with the compiler. You can get the VS.NET 2003 native C++ compiler (the full optimizing version you get with the Professional version of Visual Studio) and libraries as a free download from MS. You only pay for the IDE and debugger. The VS.NET 2005 compiler has further improvements as does the IDE and as others have said you can get the beta for free and it's pretty stable.

I believe it's possible to use the free VS.NET 2003 C++ compiler from the VS6 IDE - a bit of Googling should turn up the details if you want to go for the free route.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
One thing, it sounds like you are under the impression that if you build a project in VS.net, that the target system will need to have .NET foundation library installed. Not true. I have my current game project being built in C++ and DX9, using VS.net. When I take it to work it runs fine, we do not have .net foundation installed here. I know this because my .NET app fails to initilize when I run it here.

Just wanted to let you know that, just because the compiler supports .NET does not mean that your project will ever link to it (ie. require it).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guys, thanks everyone for your answers. Frankly, I never used the Intel compiler, so I didn't know such compilers worked as plugins. Also, knowing that VS.net supports ANSI C++ is a relief. At the moment, someone suggested me to try CodeWarrior. I will give a look at it, if I'm not satisfied I will try the VS.net 2003 compiler with VS6 and the VS.net 2005 beta. I'm going to download both them now, just to make sure I don't lose or forget them, as well as the Febryary DX SDK, and I already got the October release of the SDK, so in the worst of the cases, I can keep using VS6 with a not too much outdated SDK, for now... :P Thanks again everyone ^^

uckevin111: I feel forced to use scripting languages because when I install VS.net, I also install languages I don't want. I don't know if I can exclude the .net framework and C#/VB.net editors at install time, but for what I remember, VS.net installs all his folks: VJ++, VisualFoxPro, C#, VB.net...

edit: I just realized that the J++ is now called J#. Well, that's what I meant everytime I typed J++, I forget it has his name changed on vs.net, too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
uckevin111: I feel forced to use scripting languages because when I install VS.net, I also install languages I don't want.


During the install, instead of clicking on typical installation, choose custom installation. Then you can choose which ones you want to install, such as C++, VB, J#, etc.

Also, as far as I am aware, VB, J#, C# are not scripting languages. VBscript is a scripting language, but VB is a full language just like C++.

- Kevin

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Anonymous Poster
You can use Dev-C++, it has directx 9 libraries and is 100% non-Micro$oft

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
uckevin111: I figured out there was such a possibility, though I think framework is compulsory. Oh, I call those languages "script" because of my contempt. I know they are half-compiled... It would be the same as "lame language".

Anonymous Poster: is it from Borland? You'r post, for how short, it's the most interesting :p

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
No it's from Bloodshed software.

Just watch the libraries...there was always that "gotcha" when porting the DX libs over to the Borland library format, and I think there's even more of them when porting them over to GCC format.

AFAIK they DO have a DX9 package for DevC++, but I'm not sure what version it is..

IMHO it's still far safer to use an MS IDE to compile DX code. Too many instantly bash MS because it's MS. Not a good enough reason to me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Sign in to follow this