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King_DuckZ

OpenGL A compiler for DirectX9 please?

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I just discovered that DirectX9 SDK has no longer support for Visual Studio 6. I already found a thread on gamedev using Google, so I don't wanna start a clash now, but I'd like to hear from few people if you would ever develop a game using a managed language such as VB.net or C#. I mean, the .net environment is clearly for managerial softwares, why should they force me to migrate towards the .net? I will never mess my pc up installing all the unrequired services, languages, frameworks and libraries that Visual Studio.net installs. Thus, my question: can you suggest me another C++ environment which is not Microsoft? I'd like it to have support for DX9, but if it doesn't, it's the same, I'll just stick to OpenGL. Just point it out if you post a reply, please :) Bill Bill Bill... If you read me - or anyone related to you does - pick your framework, roll it up, and stick it up in [censored]

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It no longer supports it, but I'm not sure if it will not work, it just might.. And also, no one is forcing you to use D3D9.0c, you can always stick with previous versions.

You can always download the free .NET2003 compiler(-only), or the .NET2005 Express Beta (something like that). Good luck!

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It doesn't work. I got many linker errors, and searching the net I learned that errors are due to the lack of support.
Tell me about this free .net compiler... How does it work? I mean, how can I do debugging, is it possible or it's just for compiling code you know it's working?

About the .net2005 beta, well, I think previous versions are buggy enough, a beta would cause my pc to explode. I still remember an error on .net 2003, the whose description was "Catastrophic error!" and nothing more... Definitely, I will never install that environment on my comp.

PS: Don't misunderstood, I generally like Microsoft, and I don't mean to start a poll to decide how much gay Bill is. I just got mad because MS is forcing me towards languages that looks more like a script to me. I don't understand why they're wasting so many efforts to get DX to work with .net scripts... Did you see the tutorials for C# in the DX SDK? It's scandalous...

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Quote:
Original post by King_DuckZ
I just got mad because MS is forcing me towards languages that looks more like a script to me. Did you see the tutorials for C# in the DX SDK? It's scandalous...


From what I understand, C# has little to do with microsoft itself. C# and .Net are different in that C# is a programming language whereas .Net is actually a framework that Microsoft developed that changes the way windows sets kernel-mode permissions and system calls behind the scenes (the Windows API). I've heard rumors to the effect that Microsoft will be using only .Net in it's next version of Windows codename "Longhorn" and have everything running MFC and previous actually running in an emulator.

Long story short, I've been using .Net Studio 2005 Suite (the full version, thanks to my boss), DirectX and C++ all at the same time. It works wonderfully and the debugger is priceless! I'd say go for it, get the free version. Even though it's Beta it's suprisingly stable for a Microsoft product.

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Well, if you say so, I think I can try it as a last resource ;) Speaking of the .net framework, I hope what you said about Longhorn is just a rumor. I will leave Windows as soon as they leave the PE format, or as soon as they decide to bung a garbage collector in every line of code I write.

Btw thanks for the comment about .net studio 2005. If it turns out to be as good as Visual Studio 6 was, I'll be glad to install it.

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Quote:
Original post by King_DuckZ
I just got mad because MS is forcing me towards languages that looks more like a script to me.


Just because they support Visual Studio .net does not mean they are moving to a scripting language. You still can use C++ with the .net environment. Not sure if that's what you meant, but they are not forcing you to use VB .net or C# .net, just the environment.

I currently have Visual Studio 6 installed at home and I can compile directx9 code just fine. Maybe you didn't set up directx correctly or didn't add some .lib files or the path to the include or lib folders? Just a thought.

- Kevin

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Quote:
Original post by King_DuckZ
I just discovered that DirectX9 SDK has no longer support for Visual Studio 6. I already found a thread on gamedev using Google, so I don't wanna start a clash now, but I'd like to hear from few people if you would ever develop a game using a managed language such as VB.net or C#.
I mean, the .net environment is clearly for managerial softwares, why should they force me to migrate towards the .net? I will never mess my pc up installing all the unrequired services, languages, frameworks and libraries that Visual Studio.net installs. Thus, my question: can you suggest me another C++ environment which is not Microsoft? I'd like it to have support for DX9, but if it doesn't, it's the same, I'll just stick to OpenGL. Just point it out if you post a reply, please :)

Bill Bill Bill... If you read me - or anyone related to you does - pick your framework, roll it up, and stick it up in [censored]


It has nothing to do with the .net framework. Visual Studio 6 is a very old programming tool that simply is phased out. They now only support the Visual studio .net programming tool. There really is not anything strange about it at all. You can pick up an older 9.0c SDK version in the MSDN archive (do it now before that too is phased out. You'll find it in the one of extras I believe) That should solve your problem. I think you must accept that this is the end of the road for VS6, and that it is time to either upgrade to a new version or change to another programming tool.

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Hmm. I wonder. If you ever used Intel C++, it installs itself in the compiler settings in the VS6 menus. If you knew how that worked, I can imagine you could write a plugin to use VS 2003 C++ compiler (free one) with the VS6 editor. You just click on the compiler and than everything will now compile with the new VS 2003 compiler. But does the VS 2003 compiler have a debugger you could plugin to VS6?



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You seem to be pretty confused about what Visual Studio .NET is. It's not just for .NET / managed code or for VB.NET and C#. The native C++ compiler in Visual Studio 2003 is much better than the one in VS6 - more standards compliant and much better at optimizing code as well as fully supporting newer instruction sets like SSE 1/2/3. The debugger is also improved as is the STL implementation that ships with the compiler. You can get the VS.NET 2003 native C++ compiler (the full optimizing version you get with the Professional version of Visual Studio) and libraries as a free download from MS. You only pay for the IDE and debugger. The VS.NET 2005 compiler has further improvements as does the IDE and as others have said you can get the beta for free and it's pretty stable.

I believe it's possible to use the free VS.NET 2003 C++ compiler from the VS6 IDE - a bit of Googling should turn up the details if you want to go for the free route.

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