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BlackWind

worried of the future.......

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BlackWind    212
(this has nothing to do with gameprogramming) hi, i am an student of computer science. i am worried because i see that what i am learning in the school is too basic and i think works for nothing in the "real world", i want to know something more than "learning a programming language", i need to know what are the real requiriments for working in a good company (besides experience of course), what techniques , algorithms or so do i have to be able to program...... but i dont know where to begin. What can you recommend me? books? which books? about what topics? or how ? i have no clue..... please give me some advices..... thanks in advance..

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JOL    160
You must be able to deliver what is asked of you, thats basically it - and be a good comrade and pay attention.

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aaroncox1234    298
I've been working extremely hard at school, getting great grades, and getting really ticked off at how little I'm actually learning. I was about to give up on working for the grades until I started applying for summer work terms. It's mighty easy getting job interviews when you've got killer grades. All I can suggest is put up with school's crap, get a job, and learn how to program there.

As for books, I had an interview on Friday for a C++ programming position. The guy told me I should read Code Complete to prepare for my work term. I'd also recommend Thinking in C++ (it's free), Effective C++, and More Effective C++. That's of course assuming you want to work with C++.

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Wavarian    850
This is your first year, isn't it? First year is more of an introductory year if anything. Next year should be a little harder, and then the year after that you'll either be bored because it has nothing to do with programming, or upset because the topics being covered are difficult to get the hang of.

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Jaywalk    250
If you want to learn as much as possible, the main thing is not to limit yourself to what you're taught. Get it into your head that learning a language is nothing difficult, do your assignments and get good marks, but don't stop there. Reading different books is very helpful, but not always necessary. The most important thing (in my opinion, at least) is to experiment with whatever happens to take your fancy. Keep yourself constantly challenged with small tasks which you find interesting.

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abstractworlds    194
Quote:
Original post by JOL
You must be able to deliver what is asked of you

This is true in the first few years, then try to progress on to the next level... i.e.
delivering what your client really wants, not necessarily what they say they want!

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BlackWind    212
thanks for your replies, but my real question is.... what do i need to know?.

i know that i need experience and be able to work in a team.
i investigated by my self on gameprogramming, beacuase i want to live of that (but with my own company), but i know i will need to work in something while i get some recurses and money to dev games....
but this is going to be my 3rd year of the school and i feel i am not learning anything.
besides reading a book of "how to program in 'x' language"... what other books should i read (of which topics?)

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Extrarius    1412
Quote:
Original post by Prototype
The real learning starts when you actually get your first job. School is just about getting your entrance ticket.
While it is true that you'll generally learn a lot when you get your first job, you should be learning about the business and people side of things IMO and NOT the programming aspect. Personally, I'm getting something like a 3.0 GPA in school right now because I'm not wasting my time on pointless homework and the like and I'm instead learning to be a computer scientists by reading books and papers and doing tons of experimenting on my own.

The main skills you need are the ability to thing logically, the ability to cerate algorithms {ie break things down into steps so you can implement them}, and the ability to learn. You'll also want experience with a few computer languages (C++ is recomended as is experience with a lisp dialect).

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