• Announcements

    • khawk

      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Jihn

"reinveting the wheel"

3 posts in this topic

Ah yeah...whatever! Anyhow I was just hoping for a bit of input from you folks...hoping. I'm a programmer for a new game company debuting around 4th quarter 2001. Anyhow the company I'm working for is currently developing anew library of games, and for these games we are developing a new engine....sorta like the unreal, or quake engine.....but an all original system and features...no reused source but from scratch! Let's skip the babble....we have two lead programmers (what?)....and the company is giving us the right to choose to sell the potential engine (SDK) or keep it only for our games. Ofcourse we will make around 2-3 games before we would even think of releasing the for sale - license. My question is....is this a wise investment (selling the engine)? Or should we be bad and keep the glory? I don't have the whole say-so but I am 50% of it! All input is appreciated. Edited by - Jihn on 11/1/00 3:11:27 AM
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Licensing your engine can provide a nice alternate revenue stream, should your titles take off and get good sales and publicity. The main problem is that you''ll end up having to allocate some resources for technical support for your licensees, if you''re a very small company this could be a manpower drain.

I would assume that, at the same time you''re licensing your ''old'' technology you''re working on the next generation of your engine. You want to stay a step ahead in-house to maintain the competitive advantage your custom engine should be giving you.

All this, of course, IMNSHO.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Eh tahnks Scarab! Well we''re independent developers but we''re not really small....around 50-60 folks not to mention the 3rd party folks. Yeah and I agree about renewing the engine to another level before releasing the original.

Okay hope you don''t mind the questioning! We''re developing a engine sorta like the quake engine or similiar to the newer Terraform engine used in Project I.G.I. My question is from what I know you give the buyer complete control to use, revamp, or remake your engine....isn''t it some kind of way to limit this?
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
There are a couple of ways to deal with licensing your engine as far as not giving away the WHOLE thing all at once. Some folks (Power Render, for instance) will license the "object code and tools" at one price (affordable) and license the source code at another (EXPENSIVE!).

Personally, once I finish my engine and tools I have no intention of providing the source code! Sure, it may lose a licensee or two, but it''s less of a support nightmare to just have one or two versions out in the field rather than each place having some hack of your original you now have to try to deal with.

If you provide DLLs or libs, docs, and tools you should be in good shape and not end up revealing everything you''ve done for the past years... and you don''t have to worry about someone making a mess of your engine and advertising it as "made with the foo-power engine" (and the bad publicity such a thing can bring).

Not like someone died and make me Carmack, mind you

Hope this helps some!
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites