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Math prerequisites for learning C++.....?

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Hi Have made attempts at starting before but didnt get much further than the basic equational input/output experiments...so not very far. The reason being I had'nt had enough time to sit down and learn, and even when I did I felt as if I needed to be getting on with my current work... But come September I'll be starting a degree which in Software Engineering/Games Design, and although they say that you don't have to know a language before it starts, I'd like to have at least some basic knowledge in programming procedures and logic... Sorry for the ramble but my question is this - How good does my math's need to be to get started? Bearing in mind I'll probably be brushing up on it as I go, but I've been told that general logic is a better quality to have when starting, not necessarily very strong maths..... Thanks for any help

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i have the math knowledge of the average high school screw up, and that hasnt stopped me. i simply dont like math and im not good at it but i am still doing fine. math comes in handy all over the place though, particularly with 3d graphics and physics.

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Familiarity with and being comfortable using allgebraic variables is probably the only requirement for base programming.

Geometry and Trig will be very useful in courses beyond 1st year programming, especially if you're considering game dev. Physics is fairly vital to game programming as well, and anything beyond the most elementary physics course will require at least 2 semesters of Calculus.

So, perhaps not at first, but not having the mathematical tools will limit you greatly if you don't pick them up.

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I don't see why someone could not like maths, its the most interesting subject, and gives you the programming mind. But just try hard and you'll be ok.

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Well... Personally, I believe one of the most important maths to have is Trigonometry.. If you have trig down everything else is pretty basic... other than physics formulas like graveyard said. Currently i'm in highschool calculus and trig was the last time I really saw a math that could be practically applied to a game. I mean... has anyone out there had to find the area of an irregular shape for a game? Actually... I dont know of C++ having any kind of function for finding derivatives or integrals (definate and indefinate)... Oh well, I'd say trig would be one of your greatest tools, mainly because if you know trig you can setup sin/cos stuff like it out to be relatively easy. But of course let the computer do 96% of the work.

cos(pi/3) definately ='s 1/2

toXic1337

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I say everyone here is semi wrong. Let me explain

Most people confuse "math" with Logic. Logical thinking is crucial with programming, And I'm not talking "red is not blue" I'm talking "if roses are red, and violets are blue, I can define roses and violets as different types of flowers, and that somehow I love you." Basically if you can do logic puzzles and stuff to any degree of success you'll be good.

Math is good to have also, but Logic is more important.

Good math to have is algebra (basically math with logic) (and you need a lot of those types of functions at times) Trig is good when you draw stuff as is geometry. Physics is great if your doing anything with physical movements. But a basic knowledge of it all is all you'll need (you can look most of it up the first couple times you need it)

Honestly you don't need any math for some coding, it all depends exactly what you do.

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Certainly logic and problem solving skills are more important, but that's not the question. Further, logic and problem solving skills will be taught in part during any programming/computer science courses.

If a cursory knowledge of physics and higher mathematics weren't required, there wouldn't be so many "how do I make my car move?!?" or "what's a normal!?!" posts on these forums.

*shrug*

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It's definatly true that physics should be required, but the idea is more that it depends what you do. physics is great if your programming something like a car, but on a board game, physics has little application (animation of icons at best)

I think if most people had the problem solving skills in the first place then they'd try to solve the problems themselves.

Which is also why "Google 101" NEEDS to be taught as a introductory class, you could take out a whole Java class, just to teach people how to google stuff where you just google error messages, Not that all can be solved by yourself but in college I heard a lot of "what does missing comma mean?" Yes I actually heard that. And "how do use a pointer" (senior year in CS).

I'm not disagreeing that there's a great need for physics in the higher applications of programming, but as programming in a general sense, it's not the biggest priority, and physics is quite a... well dry course for someone to learn themselves unless they decide to go out and do labratory tests like throwing a ball and a safe off the roof of a building.

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I know this is a gamedev board and all but the OP asked if he needed good maths to learn programming. The answer to that is definatly no. You can learn programming fine with even just junior school maths. (** GENERALISATION AHEAD **) Usually people who like programming like maths (or are at least good at it) because it uses the same type of logical thinking however technically you don't need high level maths skills to code.

As an extension to that - if you want to get into games dev and graphics programming in general THEN maths is needed. Phyics, funky graphics algo's and most things revolved around maths in game dev. However I worked as an application programmer for a year during uni doing mostly gui work and the maths was never more complicated than simple +, -, * and / statements. Currently in my games dev job maths is all i ever seem todo. So code itself doesn't need great maths, but gamesdev usually does.

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