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Nazrix

Character Advancment Through Story & Exploration

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In an RPG[-ish], instead of character advancment being through use of a skill or killing monsters I was thinking it may be interesting if it was through experiencing the story (assuming there is one for the moment) & exploration. Like, if at some point in the story the character were to encounter an NPC that would teach the player''s character something or the player may find some book through exploration that would advance the player''s knowledge of a particular skill. This would reward exploration and experiencing the plot. "All you touch and all you see is all your life will ever be --Pink Floyd Quidquid latine dictum sit, altum viditur. Need help? Well, go FAQ yourself.

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quote:
Original post by Nazrix

In an RPG[-ish], instead of character advancment being through use of a skill or killing monsters I was thinking it may be interesting if it was through experiencing the story (assuming there is one for the moment) & exploration.



Hmmmm.... much potential this has, young Jedi... make a note of it, I will.

You could use this in many ways. For instance, you could chose to level down a character''s bravery and combat states should they cowardly flee from a fight. Or you could reward a player with altruism points for helping a crippled beggar. Or maybe they get villainy points for framing an innocent child.

But (yes, *sigh* always) I have a question: Would you want the player to __KNOW__ that they''re leveling up. If they know, they may seek the optimal path in terms of the story. In effect, they may try to *win* the story, and not let anything bad happen to them, because they''re trying to level up.

However, let''s say you''re supposed to experience a bit to tragedy. The sick beggar boy you''ve given a piece of bread to dies, and all the townsfolk accuse you of being a foul murderer. Yet if this didn''t happen, you wouldn''t have been exiled. And if you hadn''t been exiled, you never would have met the also exiled magician named Merlin that offers to help you restore your good name, and reveal that Morgana actually poisoned the bread, and that the boy really isn''t dead, but in deep sleep. Oh yeah, and that his name is Arthur.

So I''d recommend not letting the players know completely when they''re leveling. Otherwise I think many will try to min-max.

quote:

Quidquid latine dictum sit, altum viditur.



Yes, whatever is said in Latin does indeed sound wise.


--------------------
Just waiting for the mothership...

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About the player knowing about leveling... NO... Leave them with Skills or stats as well, but their character advances subtly so that they don''t notice... That brings up the point, though, of how the character is advanced at points in the story... Hmmmm... I think it all comes back to actions vs. concequences truthfully... Anyway...

DOC!

-Chris Bennett of Dwarfsoft - Site:"The Philosophers' Stone of Programming Alchemy" - IOL
The future of RPGs - Thanks to all the goblins over in our little Game Design Corner niche
          

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First, I'd better specify, I am thinking of this being in a single-player story-based game...

quote:
Original post by Wavinator

But (yes, *sigh* always) I have a question: Would you want the player to __KNOW__ that they're leveling up.



Good question, Wav. Well, although, your ideas are good I wasn't thinking quite along those lines. I was thinking that a component in the story would actually lead to the furthering of the player's knowledge of a skill (I am presuming there's some sort of skill-based system being used).

For instance, the player is experiencing the storyline (a realatively non-linear one of course) and on the path of this plot the player finds a retired soldier. The player does some favour for the soldier, and in return the soldier teaches the player some things about combat.

The point is that the advancement is part of the story, but not exactly a direct reaction to the player's action. More just another element of the story.

I suppose my goal would be to allow the player to explore the story and allow the advancment to just be part of it. That way players are not repeating a skill to advance it or killing our beloved goblins...they're just experiencing the story.

I would want the player not to think about "leveling up". They'd think about the story or exploration of the world and the leveling would be part of either or both.

I suppose the difference is between what I am writing about and what you were talking about, Wav, is that I was thinking more on the lines of skills rather than attributes (such as bravery,etc)...It's not a big difference, but is slightly different so I thought I would propose what I was thinking of originally.

quote:

Yes, whatever is said in Latin does indeed sound wise.



Ah you know Latin?
I just saw it on a web page & thought it was clever



"All you touch and all you see is all your life will ever be --Pink Floyd
Quidquid latine dictum sit, altum viditur.
Need help? Well, go FAQ yourself.



Edited by - Nazrix on November 7, 2000 6:27:39 PM

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Guest Anonymous Poster
I tink leveling, though excedingly arbitrary, is very important to the risk/reward aspect of any game.

If you remove leveling and replace it with subtle and invisible changes in skill, you MUST replace that risk/reward balance with something else. Equipment or specific skills are the obvious solutions.

That being said, Planescape: Torment gave the vast majority of its experience points through dialouge, not combat. Indeed, it was through dialouge that you also recieved your most useful skills and some equipment.

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quote:
Original post by Anonymous Poster


That being said, Planescape: Torment gave the vast majority of its experience points through dialouge, not combat. Indeed, it was through dialouge that you also recieved your most useful skills and some equipment.


Oh really? That''s great...exactly what I''m talking about. I should check that game out. I always thought it was going to be another Baulder''s Gate.




"All you touch and all you see is all your life will ever be --Pink Floyd
Quidquid latine dictum sit, altum viditur.
Need help? Well, go FAQ yourself.

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hay
the best whay to make compelling characters is to introduce adversity and personality conflicts!

Obveously thare are many other whays to create compelling characters but that is the simplest way...

(like the simple make your characters Funny, Evil, Or Just Bad ASS)

but inctroduce things like your charcter has to face and go along with things that he/she is dead set against and is thus chalenged on a deper level...
Another good why is personal loss Like a family member and seeking revenge but that twists the charecter to Evil when he must struggle with him self to do Good...
The choices are endless...
enjoy!

But most of all just make the Story surrounding the Characters Serious! and Deep (can never be to deep)
you dont have to lesten to im only a writer...

Keep conjuring the undead, my friends...

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