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Source Control in Visual C++ 2003

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Hi, I hope this is the right forum to post this question. I have Visual C++ 2003 standard edition and I need a Source Control system for my projects. I installed Perforce but how do I get it intergrated into VC++? Does it even work with the Standard edition or do I have to use it externally? I just can't find this info anywere. All I can find is that I need to open the options dialog in Visual C++ and select the SCC that I want, but there is no such option. thanks

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Unfortunetly SCC integration is only available in .Net Professional AFAIK. You'll have to use Perforce manually with the Standard Edition.

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Any specific reason why you can't use a CVS type system; or Subversion (although never using it myself). There has to be some sort of OSS Windows CVS server out there; and there is a load of free CVS clients as well. Will save you the trouble of having to get a hold of a *legal* copy of Source control.

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I didn't mention it but I recommend TortoiseSVN as well. I've been using it since last September for all my VS.NET projects (C++, C#), and even homework, including storing Word and LaTeX documents. Of course, diffs don't work with Word documents, but it's still great for working on files from multiple locations such as home and school.

BTW, Subversion and related programs are all free.

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Let me make this clear: You can use a version management system for your source code entirely without any native support in the tool VS.NET or whatever.

The only advantages having it integrated are:

- Checkin / checkout / commit /update or whatever from the IDE
- It will automatically NOT commit your binaries, object files, intermediate files etc
- It may automatically add added files into version management etc

You can still use something like Subversion, even if your IDE knows nothing about it. As far as the IDE is concerned, you're working on a local project on your own.

The only issue is to ensure that you commit the right project files etc, not user-specific ones.

Mark

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This topic is 4661 days old which is more than the 365 day threshold we allow for new replies. Please post a new topic.

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