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Landfish

Noteriety

3 posts in this topic

I don''t know, this seems painfully appropriate. Noteriety can be a really great tool in games, since we''ve been seeing the same clichés for 30 years now. Players tend to assume that if multiple NPCs say something to them, it MUST be the gospel truth. For any astute game writer, this should be an obvious chance to capitolize on a cliché... An example is in Phantasy Star III on the Sega Genesis. I really didn''t like this game all that much, but there were moments. This example is now cliché in it''s own right now, but it still serves my purposes: In the first town you start in has several NPCs who tell you various, signpost kinds of things. Many of them describe the Layans, the ancient enemies of your culture; the Orakians. "I hear the Layans eat children..." one says. "The Layans have slain countless numbers of our proud young men..." says another. As time passes in the game and you go off on several journeys, eventually you come to a Layan city. You''re so prepared for a battle immediately, and what do you hear but: "I hear that Orakians eat children..." Players just innately believe what NPCs tell them, thinking it''s the next signpost to the next event trigger... Something to keep in mind, whilst writing an RPG, or what have you. ====== "The unexamined life is not worth living." -Socrates "Question everything. Especially Landfish." -Matt
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Yeah, that is a good point LF. I remember in Castlevania II for the regular NES some of the NPCs would lie. I think it was because they feared Dracula or something...that was actually a pretty cool game in its time


"All you touch and all you see is all your life will ever be --Pink Floyd
Quidquid latine dictum sit, altum viditur.
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Hmm... We''re talking about using cliche''s against players? Haven''t I been suggesting we all use prejudice and cliche to create a game that plays against the player? Or have I just been dreaming my whole project? Anyway... DAMN FINE IDEA YOU GOT THERE

I am planning on doing a write up, as soon as I figure if it is already in the doc or not.

-Chris Bennett of Dwarfsoft - Site:"The Philosophers' Stone of Programming Alchemy" - IOL
The future of RPGs - Thanks to all the goblins over in our little Game Design Corner niche
          
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I liked Fallout''s system for dealing with NPC reactions and the like. I had the greatest laugh the first time i went through FO2 simply killing every townsperson I saw. By the time i reached some of the larger cities, the kids in the streets would run up to me and say "My mommy tells me you eat babies!". Of course, the second time i went through, I was a ''good guy'' and the kids would run up and say "I want to be just like you when i grow up!"


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