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C++ am i going the right way?

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Im new to all this and i want to learn C++ so first i D/L the Compiler BloodShed Dev-C++ 5 beta 9,and i went to http://www.cprogramming.com/ and im currently learning all thats in there Learning to Program in C++ tutorials section. Is that a good way to start?Are there better free compilers?What are good comercial compilers? I hope in time(not today,tomorow,month,maybe years) to make my 3d engine! Thats why im asking if im starting good. Thanx all!

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Oh thanx Stompy,but sadly im really out of money :( ill have to wait till my bro give me back my $1400! Hopefully that might take less than a month :)

Hey what are the main diferenceses between a free compiler and a comercial compiler!

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I would suggest the Thinking in C++ vol 1.
it's a really good book, and it's FREE!
just google for it, it's probably the best C++ book out there.

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You can learn C++ without books just fine. I did. The language is not that complex. What you mostly need is experience, and to be aware of the standard "tricks" you can use when implementing your programs.

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Quote:
Original post by Dark_Coder
Oh thanx Stompy,but sadly im really out of money :( ill have to wait till my bro give me back my $1400! Hopefully that might take less than a month :)

Hey what are the main diferenceses between a free compiler and a comercial compiler!


Dev-C++ is a great compiler. There are not many differences between free and commercial compilers either.

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You seem to be on the right path. At least you don't want to make Doom 4 or an MMORPG. Programming (with any language) can be tough at first, don't be discouraged and be sure to set realistic goals.

When you get to graphics try all the APIs out and use the one that you think is best, but that probably won't be for a couple months.

Also I don't own a single programming book. While they might be a good reference to have on-hand I think online tutorials should suffice for learning the language.

Quote:
Original post by Dark_Coder
Hey what are the main differences between a free compiler and a commercial compiler!


Dev-C++ is actually an IDE, it just comes with GCC which can be replaced. I think you can download one of the .net compilers from Microsoft and use it with Dev-C++. Haven't really tried it so I'm not sure.

A commercial IDE defiantly has a more professional feel to it. GCC should have no problem compiling well written tutorials though so if you don't have the money don't worry about it.

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You can learn from free tutorials and books on the internet but there is a serious quality gap between the free stuff and the good books.

I've picked up quite a few C++ books (from amazon) which have improved my programming greatly and I can't find any free information which is close to this good. Drop in to #C++ on undernet and ask for recommendations as these guys know what's good and what's bad!

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WoW thank alot guys!

Ill google that book Ilankt!

Hey just wondering:

The Beggining C++ Game Programming Book that i got suggested will help me on Game Programming and Neutral/All kinds of Programming too?

Thanx for all your suggestions!

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Quote:

The Beggining C++ Game Programming Book that i got suggested will help me on Game Programming and Neutral/All kinds of Programming too?


Although I don't know the book, presumably (since it's an introduction) it will contain a fair degree of information on general C++. However, it's probably not as complete as a generalist C++ book. This is why Thinking in C++, as recommended above (or one of several other recommendations - have a look in the books section of the forum, and in particular the C++ section) is worth a look at.

On a general note - to program games well using C++, you also need to know C++ pretty darned well. It's probably better to approach it as 'I have good general programming skills, therefore I can program games', as opposed to 'I can program games, therefore I have good general programming skills' - hmm, hope that came out as I intended!

Jim.

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Let me suggest something. If you will work with Windows as your platform, spend a little and buy MS Visual C++ .Net. You can get a license for about $90 so it wont break your economy. VC++ its a standar for professional programmers. Many tools are developed for it and its really comfortable to use.

Luck!
Guimo

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Thanx guys

Well there for ill buy that book and get a General C++ book too.And D/L that one too.

Any good simple General C++ book for programming?


Guimo ill probably buy that after i learn the language,thanx!

Guimo your name is kinda strange(spanish),were are you from?

Thanx all!

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Intellisense and an interactive debugger and in the case of Visual Studio .NET, edit and continue (make changes to your program by pausing it and rewriting a bit of code).

Those features really do save time. Learn to use a debugger, which in visual studio is a breeze, and you will know what productive really means :)

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As far as books go: have you tried your local library? Here in the UK, all local libraries are part of a national group, so if you want a book they don't have, they can request it to be delivered from a library that does have it. I don't know if anything similar exists in the US.

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Microsoft is developing a new "Express" versions of their Visual Studio 2005 products. These are basically cheaper versions of the regular applications meant more for enthusiests. They actually have the betas of the Express versions available for download at http://msdn.microsoft.com.

Also, the Microsoft C++ and C# command-line compilers are available for free.

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You don't need a commercial IDE to get started. The free ones are excellent, and you will probably be able to start without ever needing one. Dev-C++ is my favorite for Windows, and works perfectly except for a few small quirks. Also, learning from source code can be a great way to learn new things and to develop a coding style. Find some basic source code and look over it, compile it, modify it, try to understand it, etc. It's probably one of the best ways to learn.

Also, make sure you write code and don't just read the tutorials or books. Type in the examples, and do any exercises that are given. Writing code is the ultimate way to learn. After you have gone through a book, you can start working on some small text-based projects. You can probably start on some basic things like tic-tac-toe before you complete a book.

Also, make sure you ask any questions you have. IM or e-mail me if you need any help.

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Quote:
Original post by Max_Payne
You can learn C++ without books just fine. I did. The language is not that complex.

Yes it is. Tremendously, mindbogglingly complex.

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