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Do i need a good PC for.....

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Do i need a good PC for game programming and such work or i can do it in my old peace of poo? lol poo lol Im very interested in that,or i should wait and save my money till the cell procesors get here?

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I program on a 1.8Mhz machine which many people will call aging. it's better to have a good machine, but "good" in this case means "can play your game". If your doing a "text based game" (meaning no graphics) You'll only need a 486 unless you're doing something extreme.

It really depends on what you're doing or planning on doing, but I'm pretty sure anything your using now should be decent enough to program the beginnings of a game.

Edit: my bad 1.8GHz.

[Edited by - kinglink on March 10, 2005 1:42:51 PM]

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Yeap, I agree with everything said. If you are doing intensive gfx programming, you will need a higher class comp. But if not, a low end is fine. RIght now I am on Spring Break, so I didn't get to take my P4 with me. I am at home using a 733mhz P3 with a 64mb Geforce 2. It is far more than sufficient to do a lot of things. Not only that, I've been able to catch a few bugs in my code that I would have not seen on my fast P4. (audio programming).

So I say keep your old comp around for working with but you should get a upper level CPU. I know that the faster you can get and more memory, the better your programming experiences will be [wink]. 'Cell Processors'? Blah, get something now and don't worry about the future. As soon as something new comes out, it will be outdated in a few months anyways, you know? Just the way computing is. I am going for a 64bit though, I'm going to save up to get one as my primary means of compiling to see if it's better than the Prescott P4 line of computing that I'm happy with now.

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Quote:
Original post by Tano
A simple PC will work good for beginner.. But i don't know if you have a x286 :D.
I wrote a full Scorched Earth clone in QBasic on an 80286. Ran like a dream, too, with 256 color support and even mouse routines. So don't knock it [grin]

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Original post by Lazy Foo
if anything its good to develop on a lower end computer to make sure you games are efficient.
Nonono - it's good to test on a low end computer. You want to develop on as high end a computer as possible, so that you're not waiting six hours for your hello world app to link. [smile]

Whether the spec is sufficient for development is the same question as for anything else - will it be sufficient for the programs you want to run? Compiler, linker, IDE, 3D modelling app, photoshop...

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If your happy with your computer's speed, it should be perfect for basic game development. However, past a certain point computers can become painfully slow. My Cyrix 180MHz laptop with 24MB RAM takes 15 minutes to boot up, and is just about unusable. A 400MHz processor, 128MB of RAM, and a 16MB video card should be fine for a while.

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Sometimes, older is better. My old 500MHz Athlon PC, 256 MB RAM, running Win98SE, was a fine development system. I upgraded to an Athlon XP 2.5 GHz with 1 GB RAM and WinXP two years ago and had to completely rewrite my game engine! It was using DirectDraw from DX 6.1 and WinXP uses DX 8 by default. And you can't get a DirectX 6 app to compile and run correctly when DX 8 is on your system, as I learned the hard way. So if you're aiming for a retro 80's or even 90's game or something similar in appearance and needs, stick with a more or less 5 year old PC if it works good.

Best wishes. :)

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I learned my (modern PC) chops on a K6-2/200 with 128MB of RAM and still point all of my releases to run on that machine.

If you can't code efficiently enough to build a game that runs fine on that kind of machine*, honestly you shouldn't be writing games. Nothing personally bothers me more than the gamer kiddies who want the best and brightest when all they play is Counter-Strike.

* 3D games might not count, but that's hardly an excuse. Quake II ran fine.

[Edited by - Ravuya on March 11, 2005 1:44:12 AM]

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[i[/i]
Sometimes, older is better. My old 500MHz Athlon PC, 256 MB RAM, running Win98SE, was a fine development system. I upgraded to an Athlon XP 2.5 GHz with 1 GB RAM and WinXP two years ago and had to completely rewrite my game engine! It was using DirectDraw from DX 6.1 and WinXP uses DX 8 by default. And you can't get a DirectX 6 app to compile and run correctly when DX 8 is on your system, as I learned the hard way. So if you're aiming for a retro 80's or even 90's game or something similar in appearance and needs, stick with a more or less 5 year old PC if it works good.

Best wishes. :)


You could have just as easily installed Windows 98SE on your new machine, and not have installed DX8 or whatever.

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You can start game programming on any old computer, as long as it can support 2D games relatively well - however, you may want a computer with (at the very least) Windows 95.

You only need a serious gaming rig when one or both of the following applies:
- You want to play the latest games on the highest settings.
- You want to use shaders and other advanced programming techniques and render scenes with lots (and I mean lots) of polygons, demanding sound, and various other fancy things.

So, until this occurs, sure, you can use any old PC lying around to learn how to program and create simple (yet fun) games.

Good luck! [smile]

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Some might say that to begin developing on a top-end machine is bad since u become less concerned about how ur code sux resources, since its less noticable.

ace

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My cp has a RADEON 9200, 512MBRAM, 1.6Ghz pentium, and 80 GIG HD. It is years old definatly aging, I had to replace the video card. For development, I recommend close to what I have if you are doing 3d just because you need to get a game working, then optimize it. It usually is easier to optimize working code than to optimize while coding, as long as you don't write horrible code. If your original code isn't just terrible, than do the killer optimizations later, and test on a slower machine, your required specs for the game. Unless it is overly complex, shaders, etc... I don't think you need the top of the line. Remember, doom and descent ran in DOS on 486 and quake easily on 120 pentium. Be sure you test your code on smaller PCs so you will see the need to optimize or you won't notice the slowdowns due to a superfast graphics machine.

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Quote:
Original post by ace_lovegrove
Some might say that to begin developing on a top-end machine is bad since u become less concerned about how ur code sux resources, since its less noticable.


I can't say bad, but I can say disadventageous, so I strongly agree with you. I am just now finishing up Spring Break. When I went home I had to work on my old 733mhz P3. I am doing audio development right now, so I didn't need that much. However, a lot of issues with my audio library popped up that didn't happen on my P4 3.2GHZ. If I would have not switched development computers, I would have never found them. Beta testers would have, but I would have no idea why it happened. So, you should have the best of both worlds to work with if you really want 'decent' working code!

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Since the first game you should probably code is Tetris, and even textual output would be just fine for a Tetris clone, you could, in theory, use any machine you come across for the first year or so of your programmers career. It may be difficuilt finding the right tools for prehistoric PCs, so just get anything relatively decent without spending too much cash. Should be just fine for coding and you wont code Unreal anytime soon anyway.

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My computer is an old 1.2Ghz AMD with 64MBs of RAM and a 12G hard drive. If I can't get my programs to work on this computer than something is really wrong with my code.

The key is to program efficiently. Thinking that optimization isn't important because "computers are fast now" is the wrong approach.

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for the longest time I programmed everything on a 950mhz machine. I didnt upgrade until a few months ago. Now I use a 2.8Ghz. the compile times are much faster and with more RAM, I can have more things going at once which I enjoy. I also got a graphics card that could support pixel shaders because I wanted to mess around with implementing them in my game. Basically a fast machine will result in faster compile times and the like. Get agraphics card good enough to support the types of games you want to make.

Really pretty simple

Dwiel

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Scared Eye - True. But considering my history of getting older applications to run on newer versions of Windows (which is around 50-50), I decided it would be better to rewrite it than to answer hundreds of emails and calls from paying customers who can't get my game to work. :)

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Quote:
Original post by Ravuya
Quote:
Original post by Scet
The key is to program efficiently. Thinking that optimization isn't important because "computers are fast now" is the wrong approach.


I couldn't agree more.

The problem I have is that I have a fast machine (or whatever one considers fast). 2.6GHz, 768 MB RAM, Ati 9800 pro
Sometimes I would like to know if the game would still run on slower machines with less ram and a crappy vidcard. This doesn't mean that I write crappy code but I hate the uncertainty. I would like to know it (like know the fps or something like that). I can guess it because my games are all very simple but I don't know it and every time I add another if(...) into my program I think about the performance hit it might take :/ maybe this is paranoya without a reason but I can't help myself.

To the topic: Everything >1GHz (256 or 512mb ram) should be fine imho.

edit: typo fixed

[Edited by - BiGF00T on March 11, 2005 7:29:50 PM]

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