• Announcements

    • khawk

      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
TechnoGoth

Ten games every designer should play

225 posts in this topic

I would add: Super Ghouls 'n Ghosts on the SNES.

It has an amazing gameplay that I would describe as "A frustrating game has never been so addictive". Finishing this game is really an achievement.

And also Goldeneye on the N64, again, because of the great gameplay.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Top game: Chrono Trigger - I've played this game more then fifteen times through (easily), and I STILL haven't discovered everything to it. Disagree? Try this: go back through the game and *deliberately* try to mess things up - ie, go through the portal to the future, and then back to the present. They really cover everything.

2nd. FF7 - one of the first 3D RPGs, and one of the best RPGs to date. It also deals with some very complex issues in a compelling manner (without turning the game into a documentary, I might add).

3rd. Fallout 2 - better then Fallout 1... in many ways just because there's MORE XD. Ironically I preferred Fallout 1's character design.

4th. Xenogears - some of the best dialog and use of music I've ever seen in a game. (could also desperately benefit from anti-aliasing or higher resolution modes, but hey, it's a ps game ;) ).

5th. Half-Life - If you want to make a good FPS, you've got to start here. Half-Life 2 is equally noteworthy (plus the gravity gun is one of the coolest ideas I've seen for an FPS).

6th. System Shock 2 - Why hasn't this appeared yet? SS2, apart from perhaps being the most pirated game in existence, gave an excellent blend of horror, FPS, and RPG style gaming. Also noteworthy is Clive Barker's Undying.

7th. NeverWinter Nights - If you want to make a flexible RPG, then you HAVE to look at the way this was designed. In this regard the game is absolutely beautiful. (It would have benefitted from a slightly darker feel me thinks).

8th. Unreal Tournament (99) - Excellent example of a dark, gritty FPS to actually contain a STORYLINE while retaining an arena-like system of gameplay. UT2k3 fell pathetically short in this aspect, while UT2k4 came close to matching UT99's level of atmosphere (wasn't dark and gritty enough in a lot of the character design and levels - although some were perfect).


9th. Fallout Tactics - The perfect example of how NOT to design an editor for the public.

10th. Chrono Cross - Excellent example of depth and replayability. Tons of side branches, if you look for them.

(For RTSs, I vote Age of Empires 2, for being original enough to not have you harvest a stupidly generic resource like Blizzard did. Sorry, but it's true.)
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
Original post by HeavyBlade
(For RTSs, I vote Age of Empires 2, for being original enough to not have you harvest a stupidly generic resource like Blizzard did. Sorry, but it's true.)


I wouldn't say the resource system in AOE2 is that much better than in Blizzard games. While it's a little more detailed, it isn't what you could call a spectacular improvement. Take a look at the games:

Warcraft II:
-Oil
-Gold
-Wood

(* denotes an item that is also on the WC2 list)
AOEII:
-Wood (*)
-Food (* (not on the list per se, but you needed farms if you'll recall))
-Gold (*)
-Stone

So really, each of those 2 has one item that the other doesn't. AOEII has more overall resources, which could be considered both good (more realistic), or bad (more complexity). The food in WC2 is produced at a building rather than collected, whereas AOE has some variation in the sources. I wouldn't say overall that AOE has it that much better though if you actually consider both of those systems.

Quote:

6th. System Shock 2 - Why hasn't this appeared yet? SS2, apart from perhaps being the most pirated game in existence, gave an excellent blend of horror, FPS, and RPG style gaming.


Yes, this was indeed an excellent game, which had slipped my mind. This had quite a good storyline, with a few twists into it. Gameplay wasn't the same constantly, and could be extremely varied depending on what type of character was chosen. Playing coop (added in one of the patches) with one of each character type is brilliant. A very dark atmosphere was well presented through useage of both sound and graphics. The character advancement was quite detailed, but not overly complex.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Not a single sports game on anyone's list. Interesting.

I don't have a list. I don't care what you have or haven't played; I care a whole lot more what questions you're asking, who you're talking to and what you're trying to do. In fact, I fear that some of this may be harmful because of the calcification that occurs from repeated exposure - overexposure? - to a similar design. For instance, there are dozens of number-crunching, stat-based "RPGs" on various lists, which increases the likelihood that you (the reader of these lists and player of these games) will create yet another number-crunching, stat-based RPG.

*yawn*

There's a much bigger audience out there that clearly hasn't been captivated by any of the games you've mentioned. Why? What do they want? How can we deliver it? Can we deliver it?

Those are the questions I would like to see asked, rather than serving the same answers up again and again.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
RPG GAMES, , from personal to see, I want to THINK:FF8
The fairy sword of Chinese Taiwan, the ÐùÔ¯ sword series is in the sentence in person up return very good!


Regrettable of is, just on the PC
no English version,ONLY chinese version
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
Original post by Oluseyi
Not a single sports game on anyone's list. Interesting.

I don't have a list. I don't care what you have or haven't played; I care a whole lot more what questions you're asking, who you're talking to and what you're trying to do. In fact, I fear that some of this may be harmful because of the calcification that occurs from repeated exposure - overexposure? - to a similar design. For instance, there are dozens of number-crunching, stat-based "RPGs" on various lists, which increases the likelihood that you (the reader of these lists and player of these games) will create yet another number-crunching, stat-based RPG.

*yawn*

There's a much bigger audience out there that clearly hasn't been captivated by any of the games you've mentioned. Why? What do they want? How can we deliver it? Can we deliver it?

Those are the questions I would like to see asked, rather than serving the same answers up again and again.


I agree completely...

Monster Rancher, M.U.L.E., Grand Turismo, Mutant League Football, Robotron, Super Bomberman, Ikaruga, Dig Dug, Sim City, The Lurking Horror...there seems to be a huge variety of games overlooked on most peoples (far to RPG/RTS/FPS heavy) lists
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
Original post by TechnoGoth
6) Quest for glory 1-4 – PC - These enjoyable games are an excellent blend of adventure, rpg, and humor. With 3 different character types each possessing there own path through the game and methods for overcoming obstacles, make a lot more then you standard adventure game or rpg. Add to this the fact that you can bring your character along from one game into the next and you have one of the most enjoyable game series ever made.


Seconded. I'm a huge QFG fan--definately some of the finest games Sierra ever made (perhaps the finest?). In fact, I recently replayed 1-3, and am in the process of replaying QFG4.

Man, those were damn well made games.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
Original post by Oluseyi
Not a single sports game on anyone's list. Interesting.


Five sports games every designer should play

1. Hotshots Golf (ps1)
- The coolest golf game I've ever played
- Simple, yet entertaining and fun
2. Gran Tourismo 1 (ps1)
- Racing redefined
3. NBA Jam (sega/gameboy)
- First 'FUN' basketball game
- "Is it the shoes?", "He's on fire", and other great announcer quotes
4. Mutant League Football (sega)
- Football with a twist
- I'd love to see a 3D version of this!
5. Road Rash (Sega)
- Sports Bike racing with a twist

One thing that I have noticed is that the Sega Genesis console has had the most innovative games, IMO. I'm sure someone will argue me, but if you really look at all that has come from there, there has been some great stuff.

- Drew
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I just feel the need to mention the game ...

X-COM UFO Defense

I love that game! Some guy was doing a 3d remake of this game at one point, I wonder what happened. :(
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I agree with you all, mostly, but i think that your list should be made by genres, rather an all-around favourites..

For Sports, I would recommend:
the Gran Turismo series: an almost flawless series of simulation, with an ever improving physic engine, and always state-of-the-art graphics.
the Mario Kart series: just to see what one can achieve if he wants to make another kind of car games, an arcade style one.
The Winning Eleven series: just plain great football simulation, with interesting management features which are definitely NOT getting in the way of fun.
The latest EA simulations: for good examples of what a lust for good graphics and/or a juicy license can get someone to sacrifice in terms of gameplay and/or innovations.
NBA Jam or Alley Hoop: I second that, it was just a hugely funny game, with good enough a gameplay not to make you sorry you started to play after two minutes.

For RPGs, I would recommend:
The Bethesda Elder Scrolls series, because each one was just a jewel, with innovations that were highly despised, and highly praised as innovative. Huge possibilities in terms of stories and game evolution. Get lost and still love to play the game. You should be aiming for nothing less.
The Final Fantasy series: three absolutely increadible games in the very early days of consoles, and a legend was born. Good continuation, and some publicity, and a never-ending franchise was created. The only valuable game in the series that did not belong to the first three was the sixth, because it allowed you to end the game alone, in twenty-five minutes and still level five if you were witty and lucky. This is something I would like to see again in better looking more actual games. All the laters were mostly about graphics, and even the introduction of voices. Exemples of what cosmetics can get you.
The Zelda series: not exactly RPG but more Action/Reflection, the first two of the series on the NES are still played throughout the world, and some NERDs created some additional games to the series, including the extremely good Zelda: Solarus. What you want to do if you're not a paid programmer that still has high hopes for his products.
the Deus Ex series: for they blended happily RPG and FPS, creating something absolutely unheard of. Every game designer should dream of achieving something as innovative some day.
I would also like to give some examples of games which should NOT inspire you, like Nomad Soul. there was a game with david Bowie's music and correct graphics, but that had a story so twisted and a gameplay so horrible that even with the solution right under my nose, I have never been able to go further than two hours of play. Definitely something to look after, if anyone can uncover a copy. You might also want to uncover a whole pack of aspirin.

Another genre that is mostly overlooked lately, is platform games.
The Mario series: all of them, for always offering something new to the player, while always bringing back what most loved, or replacing the central them from the previous by something eve more extravagant and loveable. Something everybody should analyse, if he wants to produce series of products.
The Metroid series until the Prime evolution: for they were just immense, and fun, and had you riveted to your pad until yo had finished it, which could happen some two weeks later. And kept you riveted again each time you turned it on again. In one word, addictive.
The Spyro series: for they represent what is likeable about nowadays platform games, the twofold adventure. First, you try to finish the quest, then you enter the second quest of getting back ALL the items disseminated in the levels. Cute enough to get the attention of youngsters, and challenging enough to keep the older ones on their pads for hours on end, trying to reach that ultimate diamond they can see but not reach unless they behave perfectly. More than catchy, they are catching...
The RayMan series. Fun and still amusing.
The OddWorld series: great and innovative gameplay, with a deep story told through the levels you have to go through, you are always either chasing after something, or fleeing before something. And the addition of whistling and farting possibilities kept the younger players happy just standing there and having their pet fart all afternoon. Never underdestimate the power of gazes.

As for the RTS, you might as well want to throw in all you like, I have my favourites, but they are not absolute.
The Settlers series, just because they are complicated enough to keep you challenged, while cute enough not to let you throw your computer out of your window when stalemated.
Starcraft, because you won't find a better balanced game. They are History
The C&C RTS series, because they are part of History.
the Civilization series, because they made up some well balanced gameplays which sometimes forced you to modify your strategy on the fly. This is something you might want to do again. And again. And once more.
The "Ao" saga, including the "Age of Wonders" which should not belong there. Get a good system, a good graphic engine, and a good theme, and everybody is going to copy your game. Look at Star Wars Battlegrounds...

From there on, you should try to make your own,
Yours Faithfully,
Nicolas FOURNIALS
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Why has no one mentioned metroid prime? That game was beautifully designed and told a story without any words being spoken at all.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
as i read through the threads i also saw noone mentioned metroid prime, until the previous post. anyways heres my list (no real order):

|||Metroid Prime||| - Best ever level design EVER! an absolute beauty for a single player FPS

|||COUNTER-STRIKE||| - this is the most beautiful online FPS every created, def can not be beaten (using steam). or Golden-eye for consoles, an awesome action game, ummm.

|||Diablo 2||| - Always different but never alien, sooo many hours of my life taken away, but so damn well worth it.

|||Age of Empires 2||| - very well balanced tacticle simple RTS game

|||Jumper Redux||| - free to download, VERY addictive, ULTRA challenging game. sorry if you lose your hair from ripping it out :P

|||Pokemon||| - Yes I've played it and damn is it good

|||Unreal Tournement 2004 (the demo lol)||| - have got the full game, but still think the demo has got everything so well done. this is a 'one idea' game, meaning there is one really impressive design concept thats never done before (i think), and everything else is the same but with just some personal modifications.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
Original post by Oluseyi
I don't have a list. I don't care what you have or haven't played; I care a whole lot more what questions you're asking, who you're talking to and what you're trying to do. In fact, I fear that some of this may be harmful because of the calcification that occurs from repeated exposure - overexposure? - to a similar design. For instance, there are dozens of number-crunching, stat-based "RPGs" on various lists, which increases the likelihood that you (the reader of these lists and player of these games) will create yet another number-crunching, stat-based RPG.

*yawn*

There's a much bigger audience out there that clearly hasn't been captivated by any of the games you've mentioned. Why? What do they want? How can we deliver it? Can we deliver it?

Those are the questions I would like to see asked, rather than serving the same answers up again and again.


This is a good point. While a lot of these games are very good, and I have played most of them, I think it's more important for game designers to play a larger variety of games than any set in particular. For example, I'm playing Unlimited Saga right now for PS2. It is extremely difficult, very confusing, and the controls are quite incomprehensible. However, getting past all of that, there are some really interesting game design ideas buried in it, and playing an RPG so different from most of the ones I'm used to is pretty cool. I can see things that are original and fun, and what doesn't work and isn't fun. Otherwise we risk getting stuck rehashing the same ideas all the time.

tj963
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1. the Gothic-series:
---------------------

for having the most realistic and detailed sourrounding in an RPG you've ever seen. It's just fun to walk arround in the environment without doing anything particular to solve the story, just relaxing in the landscape.

2. Civilization:
----------------
You can learn from this game how to make people addicted to games. Very well balanced strategy-game which guides you through all stages of civilization.

3. Dangerous Dave:
------------------

Though absolutely stupid level-design it makes curious what next level will come.

4. Ultima 7:
------------

You can bake your own bread in this game :)

5. System Shock 2:
------------------

Normally I don't like sci-fi, but system shock has such a thrilling story, that I didn't want to stop playing.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Any game now is based in old ideas. For a designer, you should go to the roots.

Starflight I and II for PC - You will only know this game if you are an (old) fan fo space games and played in your 8088. Electronic Arts.
Starcontrol - Yeah... many people still make clones of this one.
Master of Orion I - Space strategy. Liked the Black Hole weapon.
Pirates! - The original Sid Meier game.
Civilization - Sid Meier does it again.
DuneII The Building of a dinasty - The first RTS by Westwood.
Pacman - But I liked MrMunchkin for Oddisey where dots run away from you.
Barbarian - Commodore64 - far before any Street Fighter game.
Racing Destruction Set - Precursor of many race/kill games.
Mechwarrior I - Play on a mech made with 50 polys at most.
Archon - Chess with living pieces. Spanned many games.
Wolfenstein - The first FPS.
Orbiter - First space simulation of a space ship. Very Very technical. You even controlled the arm!

And the game that had em hours and hours playing... if anyone remembers this one he is on my league...
Alley Cat - IBM

Luck!
Guimo



0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I didnt mention

All games by the Bitmap Brothers (Xenon2, God's, ...)
-----------------------------------------------------

Very unique style Jump,n,Run and action games.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
Original post by Darkneon
I would add: Super Ghouls 'n Ghosts on the SNES.


That's a real HARD f*cker of a game!! I can't even get past the first screen.

Well this is another 'I like this game best' thread but I would like to add (if anybody actually reads this): Rayman 2 by Ubisoft. My favorite DirectX 3d game of all times, mainly because of the story, game play and level design.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I read it :) Another one:

Gex Enter the Gecko (the 3D version)
------------------------------------

Great comic-style-feeling in a 3D game.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Well, with the exception ot the tekken games and counter-strike, this is more of a "top 10 games every turn-based strategy/RPG game devloper should play" list. Not that I'm complaining, you've listed some of my all time favorite games.

Oh, and...

Quote:

8) Tekken 3, 4 and tag – PS1 and PS2 -The Tekken series is an excellent series of games that does it job very well. It has easy to use controls, intuitive moves, plus a larger variety of different characters, and moves to learn and use. All and all it is well balanced game, with no obvious flaws and is good place to look if you want to see what a well polished game should look like.


I have a serious flaw for you. Fighting (gameplay) is reduced to getting the first hit and juggling your way to victory. I've always liked the Tekken series for its graphics, characters, and story line, but as far as fighting goes these games are simply terrible. You want a real fighting game, play the original Super Smash Brothers (N64). While it doesn't have the amazing character animations and graphics of DOA or the variety and freakin' sweet levels of melee, it is simply an unparalleled experience in the fighting game genre. The game comes down to pure skill.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Granted I didn't read every post word for word, but I've only seen mention of computer games.

Computer (or console) games are not a league of their own- they have close cousins, and often ones they are more nearly related to than other computer games, in table top and live games. It's important for a designer to have a good grasp on what's out there in the computer world, but if you play one of each category you'll have a fine idea of what they're about- and generally realize how unimpressive most of them are. Clones, replicates, derivatives- almost all of them are- of the classics. There are only a couple game genres quite unique to computers; most notably simulations (like sim city) and to some small extent twitch based games found in the early platformers (sonic, Mario, etc)- though twitch games also derive themselves from real world games like pinball and its predecessors (if sonic spinball isn't obvious enough a throwback to their origins I don't know what is).

Otherwise, there are RPGs- hailing from novels, and the oldest story telling among bored groups of friends. Play some of the original table top RPGs and even look into larping. You'll learn more about the raw mechanics behind the predecessors of all Computer RPGs that way than examining their computerized clones- times have changed quite a bit, and the simplification and mutation that occurred in the transfer from pen and paper to computer needn't be further embraced; re-evaluate the roots of these games, you may be surprised with what you find. Even 'play' some choose your own adventure type books (there are quite a few of them) and experience storytelling in the raw.

And for puzzles, sure, games like Zelda are awesome (IMO among the best computer games there are), but evaluate table top puzzle games too- there are a bunch of really wacky ones out there. The complicated simplicity of these games is incomparable, and often easily integrated into a computer game without exasperating the game rules and frustrating the player.

For strategy, fall back on the oldest strategy games there are- chess, go, checkers- learn how they work, what makes them so fun, and most importantly why they have sustained for hundreds of years.

1&2. simulation (Sim City, and maybe a FPS of some kind)
3&4. twitch based (Sonic, Mario)
5&6. pen and paper RPG (D&D, Shadowrun)
7&8. puzzles (Zelda, Lemmings)
9&10. strategy- (Chess, Go)

That's what I'd say for ten games... Just don't forget the classics.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Castlevania : Symphony of the Night.

Came out 2d at a time when 3d was the rage. Still was the best game out for PSX in any genre besides RPG. Engrossing story with good continuity between games (and i believe there 16 of em), combined with the best 'feeling' gameplay make this game a classic in my book. Any game designer should be able to appreciate the immense amount of artwork that went into making that game so immersive. as well as a great soundtrack. Top quality, but those were sony's best years...

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:

Original post by Oluseyi
Not a single sports game on anyone's list. Interesting.

I don't have a list. I don't care what you have or haven't played; I care a whole lot more what questions you're asking, who you're talking to and what you're trying to do. In fact, I fear that some of this may be harmful because of the calcification that occurs from repeated exposure - overexposure? - to a similar design. For instance, there are dozens of number-crunching, stat-based "RPGs" on various lists, which increases the likelihood that you (the reader of these lists and player of these games) will create yet another number-crunching, stat-based RPG.

*yawn*

There's a much bigger audience out there that clearly hasn't been captivated by any of the games you've mentioned. Why? What do they want? How can we deliver it? Can we deliver it?

Those are the questions I would like to see asked, rather than serving the same answers up again and again.


I would have to disagree somewhat on this. I would care what you have or haven't played. Though questions you're asking & who you're talking to is important, exposure to the media that you're working in is at least equally important. If you wanted to be a writer you would want your readers to get the most out of your work. You do that by learning to write well. You learn to write well by examining the works of other authors. Especially the ones held in high regard.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ummm....no one likes Total Annihilation and everyone likes Starcraft? Pfft... I like both of 'em.

I also liked SMRPG.

And does no one like the Baulder Gate series? I enjoyed those more then Bethseda's games.

And I aint gonna list sports games because I dont enjoy most of the sports in real life so why would I in the game?

Finally, Smash Bros. 2. What's so innovative? Zelda, a female character, isn't gimped or sexed out. Same obviously for Samus. Woah...

Yeah, there was sarcasm there.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
Original post by logain
ummm....no one likes Total Annihilation and everyone likes Starcraft? Pfft... I like both of 'em.

And does no one like the Baulder Gate series? I enjoyed those more then Bethseda's games.


I havn't played Total Annihilation, so I can't really make any judgement on it, although I've heard a lot of good things about it, so it's probably something I'll try to pick up a copy of sometime. Any particular features you'd recommend I look out for?

I listed the BG series.

Quote:
Original post by Oluseyi
Not a single sports game on anyone's list. Interesting.


I don't really like the whole concept of sports games personally - these are things you can attempt in real life - sure, you might not be as good as you could be in a game, but you'll get real benefits in fitness in addition to the fun of playing.

That being said, I'm sure there's some excellent sports games out there, with some very interesting features.

Quote:
Original post by Oluseyi
*snip*
There's a much bigger audience out there that clearly hasn't been captivated by any of the games you've mentioned. Why? What do they want? How can we deliver it? Can we deliver it?


Some excellent points there. Some excellent designs could probably be created by starting with absolutely no reference point, finding a single idea, and expanding from there into something with workable gameplay, without trying to fit it into a genre or category, or comparing it to existing games. On the other hand, this could equally as easily produce some very bad games.


Also, an addition to my list:
Pente: A two player boardgame (apparently it can be played with additional players, but I havn't tried this, and aren't sure if there are additional rules). Players take turns placing tokens on the board. Victory conditions are either being the first to get 5 tokens placed in an unbroken straight line (running in any direction including diagonals), or capturing 5 pairs of the other players tokens. Tokens can be captured by placing a token on each side of a pair of the other players tokens, as illustrated here (player one takes a pair of player two's pieces in each diagram):

* = p1 token, @ = p2 token, - = empty space

--*-- ----- ---*-
--@-- ----- --@--
--@-- *@@*- -@---
--*-- ----- *----


Although the rules are very simple, the game is quite challenging, and can require quite a bit of thought, particularly if both players are of roughly equal skill.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0