Jump to content
  • Advertisement
Sign in to follow this  

First interview

This topic is 4815 days old which is more than the 365 day threshold we allow for new replies. Please post a new topic.

If you intended to correct an error in the post then please contact us.

Recommended Posts

In about two weeks time, I'm going to have my first job interview at a game studio in the UK. Since I'll be going to the UK next week, I need to make sure that I have everything I'll need with me. I'm taking: - Code sample (I already sent them this with the application) - War of the Roses demo (sent them a slightly older version) - Copy of my resume (sent this already as well) - Sky colouring demo (my implementation of the 'Analytical Sky Model' paper) - Downforce Brew contest entry Unfortunately I don't have any other 'completed' projects except for a very ugly (but working) Snake clone. I plan on burning all of this to a CD which I can leave with them. The Downforce demo is giving me a bit of wories, since it needs to be run on the Brew emulator. They will most likely not have this installed. I can take my own laptop with me, and make sure it runs on that, but I feel taking the laptop for only a single demo (the others can be run from the CD) is a bit overkill. I'll probably also take other regular paperwork with me in case they ask for it after the interview (copy of passport, grade list). I'm calling to schedule the interview this afternoon and will ask them if there is anything they definately need, but I'd like to be ahead of them if possible. Have I forgotten anything?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Advertisement
Hi,

You may want to make a short movie out of the Brew game and put it on the CD. Also, it may be a good idea to have a backup solution for the ugly case in which you somehow lose/damage the CD. Upload the contents on a free web account or make sure you have a friend that can ftp the contents if needed.

But the actual demo might not be the decision maker, so don't forget to actually prepare for the interview. Being relaxed, comunicative, and creative brings a lot more advantages than one may think. I assume you are going there to be a game programmer. If so, make sure you freshen up a bit on the algorithms, at least the common ones. Also, if they follow Microsoft's way of interviewing they may ask you questions like: "how many gas stations are in the USA?" The important thing here is to show you are not blocked, that you have a reasoning pattern that helps you solve problems. So speak continuously, even if it seems unimportant to you. "Ok, let's see, gas stations in the USA.... What is the surface and the average station number/mile? (establishing what are the given fact). ... " Then, try to make a "bug-free" pseudo-algorithm, so ask questions on each stage to make sure you are not missing anything.(that there aren't any hidden data that may alter the result). The interviewers aren'y actually interested in the exact solution with this type of problems, but they are interested to know that you are used to problem solving (establishing facts, not assuming anything, preparing for each branch of the algorithm) and that you can easily comunicate this.

Other than this, play it cool and be sure of what you want.

Hope this helps.

If you have any questions or need another example of Microsoft problem, just ask.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Thank you for the comments. All of the above demos are also available on my website, and I will make sure the other items on that list are also accessable through the web.

I will indeed be doing some more research on the company, and preparing for the interview (what questions will they ask me, how will I answer them, what questions do I want to ask them) over the next two weeks.

Good idea on the movie, that might be a nice solution. I'll check out FRAPS this evening.

Although I've never really worked with the standard algorithms (such as partitioning shemes), I know about most of them, and have a general idea of how they work. To compensate for this I'm going to make a list of algorithms/designs that my current project has, and make sure I can argue why I chose those solution. If you are referring to other kind of algorithms, could you maybe clarify what algorithms you're thinking about?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hi,

I was refering to general algorithms and theories that are used in game development. I mean it might be embarassing to be asked to write an In-Order Tree Search and to have only a vague recollection of what "In-Order" means. I am sure you know what it means, but there might be other algorithms, especially ones learned in an academic background, whose terms might have become a bit blury with time. And you might want to take a quick C++ test before the interview, if you expect to be tested from actual programming. I personally managed to get a 50% question's similarity at one interview with my previous test given to me by a friend. :)
Oh, yes. And don't be afraid to be heaten up by certain subjects that you like. Passion counts a great deal while game programming is concerned.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ok, I understand what you mean. However, I don't have a background in academic CS so the standard algorithms are unknown to me besides what I've learnt here (in the resume I sent them it is clear that I have not had such an education).

I'll try and find some C++ tests before hand.

I'm assuming it's okay to ask them what they expect out of the interview when I call to schedule the interview? That might give me a clearer picture of what to expect.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
That depends,
make sure you ask them a question that does not sound like:
"well, what should I prepare from?"
It is ok to ask what the interview will consist of, meaning whether there will be programming involved, Human Resources interview, etc. It is even something most companies would prefer to be asked(it show genuine interest and thoroughness). But you are on thin ice here if you comunicate too much eagerness, as in "let me quickly prepare minutes before the interview". Ask in a casual tone and you will be fine.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  

  • Advertisement
×

Important Information

By using GameDev.net, you agree to our community Guidelines, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy.

Participate in the game development conversation and more when you create an account on GameDev.net!

Sign me up!