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version control

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Hi people Am not sure if this is the right forum to ask this be can't really find another related site so I'll go ahead anyhow. I'm looking for a decent (free if possible) software control/config management system. I've heard about CVS, but am not sure if that's applicable to my needs. I am a single developer on a single PC. Am running XP Pro and am unsure if CVS is appropriate. I have looked at CVS homepage but am not even sure if there is a version for XP. Any ideas?

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WinCVS is a CVS GUI that allows you to do version control either through a CVS server, or simply saving to some directory reachable through your network. Check out www.wincvs.org. It definitely works on XP.

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Perforce is my favorite choice. It can be a bit complicated to setup the first time, but it's EXTREMELY powerful, and does integrate fully with Visual Studio. It's free for 1-2 person teams, or for open source projects.


- Houdini

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I'm using CVS NT as server and Tortoise CVS as client, although I'm pretty sure that CVS NT has some kind of error that freezes (well, sort of, cause everything that it running functions properly, but I cannot run other programs) my computer sometimes, when I add/commit from another computer.
Maybe it's because I'm running Tortoise CVS and CVS NT on the same computer, but I'm not sure...
Anyways, my opinion; I love it ;-)
It's soo easy and fast to recover or update files across computers.

BTW. CVS NT is for Windows XP.

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Quote:
Original post by risingdragon3
Quote:
Original post by petewood
Quote:
Original post by evolutional
SubVersion with Tortoise SVN is my combo of choice. Works perfectly on windows XP too.


Yep.
I agree as well. You don't need to setup a dedicated server; all repository creation and modification can be done directly from Explorer. There's also AnkhSVN, a Subversion plugin for Visual Studio, but I haven't tried it yet since I use Subversion for so much more than just VS projects.

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Guest Anonymous Poster
Subversion is a great tool, it's basically the next version of CVS.

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CVS is source control system people use when they don't know what else to use, but you can do better than CVS. Several of the commercial source control systems are free for single-user environments.
  • Subversion has some fans (as you can see), but mostly because it is free, it is open source, it has the basic features, and it isn't CVS.
  • Stay away from SourceSafe.
  • I personally use Perforce. I like all its features, but the UI sucks.
  • I've only taken a quick look at Evolution -- it has the basic features and it has a nice UI.

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Original post by JohnBolton
Stay away from SourceSafe.


*sigh* Why say that and not back anything up. Thats your opinion. Don't just state somethink as fact, it helps no-one.

I have used a lot of source control systems over the years, and I'm currently using Evolution for one project, which has been marketed a lot recently, and CVS+TortoiseCVS for everything else. For a single developer Evolution is free. Just download the trial version, and it becomes a single licene copy after 30 days.

I have had a few issues with Evolution ('Losing' a copy of an important file was the worst, but it sometimes loses the status of the controlled files, and you have to remind it.) Integration with .net is good (and useful) though I am unaware of how it copes with other IDE's. There is no need to have a net connection, as all source control can be done on the host machine.

Subversion is very popular, and probably worth a look into, but I havevery limited expereince with that appliaction, so I can't say any more. But I can say, if you use Tortoise (in conjunction with what ever source control method you use), you can't go wrong.

Spree

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Does one really need any justification to say SourceSafe is bad ?

I mean, even the guys at Microsoft state that it would probably be wiser to print your code on paper, run it through a shredder and burn it. SourceSafe is known to corrupt its database and the recovery tool often can't fix the damage.

Instead of a client/server architecture, the SourceSafe "database" is stored in a set of files in a shared directory. The SourceSafe "clients" then go around directly modifying those files. If the network connection of any client dies while the database is being accessed, the database becomes corrupted. And because the database is just a shared directory, any SourceSafe user could just delete the whole repository without any chance for recovery.


I'm using Subversion with TortoiseSVN and AnkhSVN and I'm happy with it.

-Markus-

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Original post by Cygon
Does one really need any justification to say SourceSafe is bad ?


Of course they do. I know why ppl think it sucks, but others don't. SourceSafe worked exceptionally well for me, and I used it for years. Others havnt been so lucky, its the way life is!

The OP is obviously looking for some good _advice_, so you can assume (I don't want to be derogitory(sp?) but its best to) they know little about all the various options. A reasoned discuss is much better in this case than a blatent statement of opinion.

Spree

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Original post by SpreeTree
Of course they do. I know why ppl think it sucks, but others don't. SourceSafe worked exceptionally well for me, and I used it for years. Others havnt been so lucky, its the way life is!


My main gripes with VSS are:

1. It loses your source code. This seems to be a fairly major issue. If a medium/large number of developers (say more than 2) are working on a medium/large repository (say more than 50mb), then it frequently becomes corrupted. There is extensive documentation explaining how to recover files, and how to repair / analyse the db, and such like, but the bottom line is, it WILL become corrupted if used in a nontrivial scenario. I've seen this happen loads of times.

As far as I can tell, VSS works fine as long as only one person uses it at a time - which sort of defeats the point of SCM.

2. It doesn't understand what deleting a file is.

Visual Sourcesafe doesn't understand about deleting files. When you delete a file, it removes it from the repository and places it in some kind of "archive". This means that if you get an old version, that file will be missing.

Moreover, when other developers update from VSS, the file won't be deleted from their working copies, rather they will just have this stale file lying around causing irritation.

Lastly, if you decide to re-create a file which WAS deleted, you have two options
- Lose the history of the old file (forget the original deleted file EVER existed)
- Lose the deletion - the new file assumes the identity of the old file, and no record is kept that it was ever deleted.

Both of these options are unacceptable, as it means that you can't just say "Show me a copy of the source code on date X" because deleted files' history is wrong.

3. It's slow - even over a decent network
4. It doesn't work over the internet, or even a WAN, respectably, without third party commercial add-ons (none of which I've tried, so I can't speak for them)

But for me the real killer is losing your source code.

It is well known that Microsoft internally do not use VSS on some major projects.

Mark

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Quote:
Original post by SpreeTree
Of course they do. I know why ppl think it sucks, but others don't. SourceSafe worked exceptionally well for me, and I used it for years. Others havnt been so lucky, its the way life is!

The OP is obviously looking for some good _advice_, so you can assume (I don't want to be derogitory(sp?) but its best to) they know little about all the various options. A reasoned discuss is much better in this case than a blatent statement of opinion.

Spree

I used SourceSafe for years and it was a nightmare. I was the SourceSafe administrator at my old job, and it got a point where we ran the database fix tools nightly, and most of the errors it wouldn't evem fix. We kept losing files and file history regularly. Looking up those errors on the MSDN and what does Microsoft suggest? Deleting the old SourceSafe database and recreating it from scratch. That was Microsoft's answer to most errors in the database, as most of them were unfixable.

I agree with others who said to stay away from SourceSafe.


- Houdini

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