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Scripting language that gets interupted and compiled

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um... I am want to use a scripting language for a game engine me and a friend are designing and was think about scripting languages. I wanted to be able to edit scripts and test them without compiling to help save time, which a interupted language can do i think. i also want to have the script run as fast as then can, which compiled scripts can do. know my question is, is there a scripting language that run the same script file and a interupted (for development) and can use that same for and compile the script(for release) or is it possiable to create a language like that.

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Quote:
Original post by 3dmodelerguy
...which a interupted language...
Interpreted.

Quote:
...is there a scripting language that run the same script file and a interupted (for development) and can use that same for and compile the script(for release)...
Interestingly, Visual Basic 6 was interpreted during development, but could be compiled for release. Anyway, most of today's "interpreted" languages are actually bytecode compiled, with a virtual machine of some sort performing runtime translation of the bytecode to corresponding machine opcodes. Pretty much the best of both worlds.

"Scripting language" is an artificial division; they are all programming languages, just with differing targets. Python and Lua, for example, despite being frequently lumped together under "scripting languages" are not very similar: Python can be compiled to an executable (with the runtime in a dynamic library, which you could conceivably embed as a resource on Windows, or, with some C trickery, statically built in); Lua, as far as I know, can not. Lua is designed primarily as an extension language; Python is fundamentally a standalone language, which can be embedded in other languages (usually painful) or extended by them (A Good Thing™).

There are lots of options, and you'll find that execution speed is unlikely to be the biggest constraint. Integration with your primary development language is far more problematic in most cases, which makes a strong argument for AngelScript if you're using C++, from what I've heard. In the final analysis, you'll simply have to examine and evaluate a few contenders to determine which language is right for you.

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