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sunandshadow

most perfectly written

28 posts in this topic

The Novel by Jin Yong are very good. He is a legendary Chinese writer among the chinese. He write kung-fu books, and the strength of his novel is he write some very good characters in his books. Last year, a writer from China says his story are cheap and this writer get flame from everywhere (internet, newsgroup, newspaper). This is an example of the popularity of Jin Yong.

(((I might get flamed for this.))) I found the bible to have some interesting story. I also like some buddhism sutra. Not all of buddhist sutra are theory, some of them talks about story of buddha and his disiple and their past life. I found the story interesting to read.

Here''s one story I found in buddhism sutra:
The story says that the buddha was once a king in his past life who is very unselfish and is willing to give anything away. Some people come and want his eye and he give them away. Some want his hand/legs/ear/toungue/penis/wife/children and he give them away. His officer was very angry at him and though he is stupid and throw the king away and let him die. As a result, some insect/worm comes to eat his flesh. (In the end he live in heaven for such unselfishness)
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quote:
Original post by dwarfsoft

Anything Fiest! The whole damn lot of them... Lots of depth and originality in story

LOTR... has some strange properties for the 3 books separation
Book I: All history, no feeling...
Book II: Bit of history, a little more feeling...
Book III: Relatively NO history, lots of feeling...

Anyone else notice that? I didn''t like Book I because it didn''t seem to have any emotion behind the writing, but I liked II and III. Anyone else feel the same?

-Chris Bennett of Dwarfsoft - Site:"The Philosophers'' Stone of Programming Alchemy" - IOL
The future of RPGs - Thanks to all the goblins over in our little Game Design Corner niche
          



I like the first book most, then they got worse. Altough they were all still brilliant. Everyone I''ve spoken to agrees that the first book it''s the best, weird huh? Still, The Hobbit rocks Read it the first time back in like 3th grade, and still love it .

"Paranoia is the belief in a hidden order behind the visible." - Anonymous
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#lengthy post warning

IT''s kinda funny to see all of you people only mention fantasy litterature (apart from anonymous above).

What about classic litterature ? What''s wrong with Shakespeare for instance ? I still remember the feeling when I saw Henry the Vth. The Saint Crespin battle speech is probably one of the most compelling thing I have ever read/heard. Why ? Because of the crescendo, because of the desperate situation (a mere 500 soldiers against the thousands of french troops, if I am correct ?), because it works on me everytime I hear/see it...

I notice no one really explain why they think their choices are well written. This thread is turning more into "my favorite author kicks ass" ... which is kinda pointless. For instance, why would I read Feist ? "BEcause it rocks" doesnt convince me, sorry.

Dwarfsoft : I agree with your remark on LOTR. I remember finding the first book quite lenghty at times, mainly the part until they reach Rivendell. Some things shine among the first book, but it''s true that it wasnt the best book. My favorite is the Riders of Rohan, and especially the battle of Minas Tirith (I hope I am not making a mistake in the names...), with the death of Theoden, and the fight of Eowyn. That scene is just Tolkien at its best. The description really pictures the dramatic moment, and the braveness of Merry and Eowyn is just the kind of scenes I always love.
Tolkien is good at descriptions, no one can really deny that. There is also a lyrism to the writing that you wont find in more recent authors. The language Tolkien uses has something poetic to it, that most modern authors forget to the benefit of action and story. That''s what you who judge the plot "simple" forget, Tolkien wasnt a great plot maker (IMHO), he was more of a storyteller, counting simple tales in a beautiful way...

O.S.Card has some very interesting books, in terms of plot. The one thing I dont like in his writings his the underlying religious thing. The books are good, but for some strange reason end up being SO manichean... the homecoming serie for instance is a very interesting story, but what could be an excellent scifi/fantasy mix with a very complicated plot, seem to turn into a bible based parable. Almost propaganda ... eeeak.
On the other hand, take his novel "The Lost boys", and you get an excellent "6th sense" style twist, with a very interesting depiction of a Mormon game programmer, and his life ... hard to really describe the whole thing. The underlying religion is still there, but it fits quite well the story.

Ah well ... another lengthy post by yours truly.

youpla :-P
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Well, okay, I liked the Winnie the Pooh books by AA Milne - they still make me laugh (I''m sure that at 20 I''m far too old for them though)

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