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LaTeX in Maths lectures?

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Hey, I am wondering whether or not it would be viable to use LaTeX (through use of a laptop) during Maths lectures. The two doubts I have to whether or not it is not viable are: 1. Whether I would be able to take all the notes I'd want to, in LaTeX form (would it be possible if I was a very fast typer?) 2. The sound of the keyboard, though I believe this is minor since there are probably some close to silent keyboards on laptops. What are your opinions/experiences of this? What do you think the advantages/disadvantages of doing this are? Thanks in Advance TomX

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It's possible, 2 guys in my math lectures did it.

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The sounds from the keyboard isn't a problem, loads of people in my CS lectures bring their laptops.

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Great :)

I guess I'll have to practice LaTeX more (got 18 months to do so) and practice my typing skills (also, got 18 months to do so).

I estimated each *tex* per lecture to be ~7.5KB, this is 37.5KB/week, given in each year there is 30 weeks of term this amounts to 1125KB/year = 1.09GB/year.

Does this estimate seem right?

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1125 KByte ~ 1.1 MByte not GByte

The estimate is a bit high, the .tex of these 2 guys was around 450 KByte for 1 year.

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The best thing to do would probably be to find(or make) a simple text editor with good text-macro abilities (ie press [Control-M, I] and you get a prompt, type in the extents, and the *tex code you want for an integral is inserted). In that case, you could do it easily (and you wouldn't need to know but the basics of *tex since after you make the macros most of it would be handled automatically).

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Quote:
Original post by Trap
1125 KByte ~ 1.1 MByte not GByte

The estimate is a bit high, the .tex of these 2 guys was around 450 KByte for 1 year.


Oh yeah, how did I miss that, I was thinking about backup... I would have needed a 2GB stick :P

Thanks for the correction.

Quote:
The best thing to do would probably be to find(or make) a simple text editor with good text-macro abilities (ie press [Control-M, I] and you get a prompt, type in the extents, and the *tex code you want for an integral is inserted). In that case, you could do it easily (and you wouldn't need to know but the basics of *tex since after you make the macros most of it would be handled automatically).

That's a good idea, I could e-mail the Maths department in the university I'm planning on going to find out what features I would need in it, making it would be my best option.

Quote:
jEdit is nice for most editing needs, and there are latex plugins available.


I've used and since uninstalled jEdit, I'll have to reinstall it again, thanks for the recommendation :)

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I strongly recomend atleast trying TeXmacs!

From texmacs.org:
Quote:

GNU TeXmacs is a free scientific text editor, which was both inspired by TeX and GNU Emacs. The editor allows you to write structured documents via a wysiwyg (what-you-see-is-what-you-get) and user friendly interface. New styles may be created by the user. The program implements high-quality typesetting algorithms and TeX fonts, which help you to produce professionally looking documents.


You can switch from wysiwyg to source mode at will. Source can be represented in many formats (latex, scheme, functional or angular), so if you like latex you'll love texmacs.

I have used it for few years now and it has been really ultimate tool for writing any documents involving equations and graphs. TeXmacs can export pdf, ps, latex, html and some other formats.

Oh, and everyone loves screenshots!!

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I even wrote a program that helps to make equations in MS word.(pretty rudimentary, supports only what i used) . (Tho, msword equations really __sucks__, and last time i checked, integrated msword equation editor was most sucking editor in the world)

It might be useful to make that: when you press right or left ctrl(or alt) and type, you can type equation more or less normally (using ^ for power, . for index, / for over and \ for normal divide, etc, like with my program), and it gets converted into LaTeX.

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In my mathematics course, no one uses laptops. If someone did I don't think they'd be very popular. They are noisey and to some people who don't have a computer intensely annoying. However it all depends on the course and the sort of people you have in lectures.

Personally I'd advise you to take hand-written notes. Perhaps then go over your notes after lectures and do a summary in LaTeX.

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The best solution is to write them by hand then go back and type them in latex. Seriously, you will learn the stuff very well by recopying your notes and you'll have both hand written and digital form.

Ratman

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When rapidly typing equations, I have a tendency to use a half-latex half-not style which I can later edit into real LaTeX. Trying to write correct LaTeX markup on the fly would be hellish, and as long as I can understand my own code later it's not a problem to do the editing.

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Quote:
Original post by Winograd
*Snipped* Post about TexMacs


Thanks for the link, I'll have to further investigate TexMacs :)

Quote:
I even wrote a program that helps to make equations in MS word.(pretty rudimentary, supports only what i used) . (Tho, msword equations really __sucks__, and last time i checked, integrated msword equation editor was most sucking editor in the world)

It might be useful to make that: when you press right or left ctrl(or alt) and type, you can type equation more or less normally (using ^ for power, . for index, / for over and \ for normal divide, etc, like with my program), and it gets converted into LaTeX.


This is what I'd be more inclined on doing, writing a program which has lots of hotkeys (which I would need to memorize) to make taking notes easier. Thanks :)

Quote:
In my mathematics course, no one uses laptops. If someone did I don't think they'd be very popular. They are noisey and to some people who don't have a computer intensely annoying. However it all depends on the course and the sort of people you have in lectures.

Personally I'd advise you to take hand-written notes. Perhaps then go over your notes after lectures and do a summary in LaTeX.

If I did decide a laptop was the way I wanted to go I would make sure the laptop made very little noise (which wouldn't be hard I predict if I only had a word processor running).

About using handwritten this is probably the more sensible way, I'll have to reconsider the pros and cons of each, thanks for the advice :)

Quote:
The best solution is to write them by hand then go back and type them in latex. Seriously, you will learn the stuff very well by recopying your notes and you'll have both hand written and digital form.


Yeah, this is one of the advantages of writing the notes first, copying them up will be beneficial I found this out during secondary school :) Thanks.

Quote:
When rapidly typing equations, I have a tendency to use a half-latex half-not style which I can later edit into real LaTeX. Trying to write correct LaTeX markup on the fly would be hellish, and as long as I can understand my own code later it's not a problem to do the editing.

I understand what you mean, syntax similar to LaTeX I guess, kind of psuedo-code. It's a good idea but I'm swaying towards just not using a laptop during lectures.

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