Sign in to follow this  

Skinned Mesh Question

This topic is 4587 days old which is more than the 365 day threshold we allow for new replies. Please post a new topic.

If you intended to correct an error in the post then please contact us.

Recommended Posts

how to get the current vertices of the current animation of a skinned mesh? for example i have a animated skinned mesh named sample.x and which has an animation set 0 as IDLE, animation 1 as running and so on, if i didnt specify what animation set to be used the default which is the one extending both arms on the side is shown. Now I want to get the vertices with the current vertices orientation of lets say for example animation set 1. How do i do that? thanks

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
It's very complex. If I understand your situation correctly, you have a ton of work ahead of you. I wish I could give you some helpful links to tutorials, but I've never happened to find any.

Maybe someone could post a few links?

If you can get your foot in the door, I can help you with much more specific questions. During your struggle, the skinned mesh SDK samples may be of some small amount of help.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ywah i knw its hard.. but thanks for the reply :)

Is there any other way i can compute the bounding volume of my mesh everytime the animation changed? ( i need these one since my object morphed into some shape different from the original one ), any suggestion would help

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The way I handled it was by using the joints. My characters already had collision spheres attached to their feet and hands, but you can also pull the position data from the bone's matrices.

Basically, you could "attach a point" to both hands, both feet, the head, and probably the torso and hip. If you want to be extremely sure of the bounding area, you would really need one on every joint. Each point should have a radius at least as large as the bone it's attached to. For example, the head point should be large enough to contain the model's head.

By animating these points along with the bones (or simply pulling the point coordinates from the bone matrices after you update through the hierarchy), you can construct bounding primitives with them. It also only needs to be as accurate as you want it to be. I only use the hands, feet, hip, and head in my engine. This means if a character was almost entirely off-screen and stuck his elbow-only into the viewing area, he wouldn't show up. I remedy this by just increasing the radius of the torso point. Of course this wouldn't work for all types of characters.

It's not a perfect result. But it's extremely quick.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
It sounds like you're talking about Rigid-Body physics. If so, that's even more complex work you have ahead of you. I've not made it that far yet, sorry.

I use moving-spheres for all of my physics; no ragdoll effects.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This topic is 4587 days old which is more than the 365 day threshold we allow for new replies. Please post a new topic.

If you intended to correct an error in the post then please contact us.

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Sign in to follow this