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EEL, the Extensible Embeddable Language

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http://eel.olofson.net/
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EEL is a scripting and programming language, designed specifically for hard real time applications. The primary target areas of application are control engineering and audio synthesis, but EEL should also be suitable for game scripting and for adding scripting capabilities to real time multimedia applications. EEL has dynamic typing, automatic memory management, exception handling and built-in high level data types such as vectors, arrays and tables. New such data types can be added at run time by host applications. EEL compiles into byte-code that runs on a virtual machine, which means that no explicit support for specific achitectures is needed for portability. The implementation is deliberately very self contained and has few dependencies, so that it can be easily integrated into "strange" environments, such as embedded devices running real time operating systems.

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This looks very interesting. In particular, it's nice to see a scripting language (and a hard-realtime one, too) which isn't afraid to use a ref-counted GC. I've long thought that the standard objection about uncollectable cycles was a spurious and easily-avoided one.

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Nice. I had a quick glance over the code and it looks as if I could understand this, if I wanted to. (That was not the case with other script languages I tried - and one major reason why I started my own.)

What I don't like (and probably most other people will like) is that it is dynamically typed (Arrgh...) and that you can use local variables without declaring them beforehand (assignment is declaration). My personal view is that these things might look convenient in the short run, but tend to produce unnecessary errors as the project grows in the long run.

There seem to be some exceptions to the adaption of the C syntax that might take some getting used to:

for x = -10, 10
{
}



Quote:

This looks very interesting. In particular, it's nice to see a scripting language (and a hard-realtime one, too) which isn't afraid to use a ref-counted GC. I've long thought that the standard objection about uncollectable cycles was a spurious and easily-avoided one.


jewelscript uses ref-counted GC, btw.

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Original post by jewe_org
Quote:

This looks very interesting. In particular, it's nice to see a scripting language (and a hard-realtime one, too) which isn't afraid to use a ref-counted GC. I've long thought that the standard objection about uncollectable cycles was a spurious and easily-avoided one.


jewelscript uses ref-counted GC, btw.


As does Python.

What is a "hard-realtime" scripting language?

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"soft realtime" means that a given operation can be reasonably expected to complete within a known period of time. "hard realtime" means that except for catastrophic hardware failure, it can be proven the operation WILL complete within a known period of time.

It's very difficult to do automatic memory management (or, in fact, any sort of memory management at all) in a hard realtime system.

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