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NickyP101

Sky

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Hey, ok so ive partially created a terrain from a hieght map, its not looking to real atm but ill research into that. Now can anyone please point me in the right direction of how i would make the sky? lol Any references or help would be greatly appreciated :) Cheers, Nick

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Basic:
Set the clearcolour of the color buffer to blue ;)

Intermediate:
Use a skybox or skydome mesh, that is always centered at the camera.
Place a nice looking sky texture onto the mesh.
Bryce or Terregen can help with generating the textures for skyboxes, whilst a site like 1000's skies has a vast resource of real life sky photo's either partial or full 360 views

Advanced:
Use a skydome and apply the sky colour using some analytic model for daylight
Sky colour Gamedev
Practical analytic model for daylight paper
Then add in dynamic clouds generated via perlin noise either on a cloud plane or mapped to the skydome (don't forget to add shadows/shading to the clouds). Gamedev Clouds
Add the sun, sun beams and anything else you fancy.

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Forget about procedural sky textures generated by noise; they simply look either cartoonish or plain crap.
Use a single realistic texture instead bound to the texture unit 0 and 1 and have them scroll in one direction at different speeds.
You can also have an extra 1D texture that would determine the intensity of the sky color at a given point depending on the current mesh height...

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i was reading over the paper "Practical analytic model for daylight paper" and i noticed it wasnt in realtime. some of the renders took a few minutes per frame. personally i would recommend taking some of those results and some of your own observations on the sky line and make one large skybox with colored vertices. this way they will blend from one color to the next and you get an effect that looks almost identical to the real thing

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JavaCoolDude:
Not sure where you get the idea that clouds (why sky textures? that doesn't make sense) generated by noise are cartoonish or plain crap. Poor shading on the clouds can look a bit plastic, but can be overcome. Also using procedural noise allows you to simulate the billowing of clouds not just animating them by scrolling.

Samples:
Yanns (from 3 years ago)
Test
Sunset
Niceday
Overcast


Adam17:
Well as far as I can tell the paper comes from 1999 at the most recent, in all likelyhood it was proberbly written before then. In which case very high quality renderings could mean it wasn't realtime. However these days its not a problem, I have an implementation that runs quite happily over 100 fps and thats not even in C++. This is working at a vertex level of a reasonably high tessalte skydome, at a pixel level I could imagine it taking far longer.

Mind you its a bit hard to pin down as there is no point having the sky colouru update in realtime, 60 frasmes per second as there isn't enough variation between frames to make a difference. Also becuase it is still quite intensive (you don't want to waste all your cpu cycles on it in a game) you'll want to distribute the processing over several frames.

However as you say there is no reason not to precalculate the dome colours (at least not these days where memory is plentiful)

The real problem is that whilst the results initially look good, you'll quickly discover that they are not correct and depending on the application you might be better off just generating the colours by hand.

[Edited by - noisecrime on May 23, 2005 1:11:26 PM]

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My most sincere apologies if I came off as an a*hole; that was not my intention for sure.
I was talking about my own experience with procedural skies and sky textures (not just clouds as you pointed out in your post), but now I've witnessed what Yann's been up to in the past few years I stand corrected.
Take care of yourself.

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Quote:
Original post by noisecrime
I have an implementation that runs quite happily over 100 fps and thats not even in C++.


I didn't know C++ was a 3D renderer ;)...

Anyway, this thread is very commonly referred to when it comes to sky rendering. It might help.

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lol - JavaCoolDude, no need to apologise, just your comments didn't equate to what i've seen. I would agree however simply using procedural methods wont gaurantee great looking clouds, where shading has a dramtic effect. So its quite possible to describe examples as being cartoonish (plastic) or just plain crap, but just to be clear, I meant this is nothing to do with the methodology, just the implementation.

James Trotter:
Well to be pedantic about it, I was talking about the langauge, more specifically that its done in Director using lingo which is interpreted, but I can never get the spelling right for that so I simplified the reply to avoid looking it up ;)

Good one on the gamedev thread, shame its the same as the 'cloud' one I had in my original reply ;)

This is all good and fun, but I wonder if the OP will ever return ;)

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Haha thank you, some excellent replies :)

One more question, what is a mesh, i seen the term before but i still dont know what it is lol.

Cheers, Nick

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