Jump to content
  • Advertisement
Sign in to follow this  
zeldachu

I want to get into the industry. I'm lost. I have no idea where to start.

This topic is 4790 days old which is more than the 365 day threshold we allow for new replies. Please post a new topic.

If you intended to correct an error in the post then please contact us.

Recommended Posts

First off, I'm a very disorginized person, so please excuse my insane ramblings. Anyway, let me tell you about my gaming backround. I've been game since I was seven years old, so that's about half my life. (Grade 9, Age 14) Over time, I became more passionate about gaming. I've developed a real big love for Nintendo games, (yes, I'm somewhat of a fanboy), as well as graphic adventures, RPGs, and anything fairly story driven. With the love both games with deep and involving stories, as well as games made by Nintendo, which focous on creative, quirky plain old fun, my tastes have truly shaped into something that I think is one of a kind. Anyway, the reason that I want to get into the gaming industry is because I want to express myself artistically, create, tell a story, and make innovative new gaming conventions. As you can see, I'm not getting into the gaming industry because I'm a left-brained computer whiz or science geek. I'm a whacked out artist, plain and simple. This is something that I'm worried about, is it possible to become a designer if you're marks in science and math are poor? Could it be a possibility if I rise to the top by starting out as a concept artist/writer? I mean Miyamoto and Aonuma were both artists right? And look, Miyamoto made Mario, Donkey Kong, Zelda, Kirby, the list could go on...as for Aonuma, he directed Majora's Mask, The Wind Waker, and the upcoming Twilight Princess. And those two are a couple of my favorite designers in the industry. As for my next question, I'm writing two game design documents. It's a creative exersize, something fun to do, so I want it to be good, and I want to get across my game idea but it doesn't need to be professional. Anyway, I was wondering what you guys think of my ideas, and if you have some suggestions of things I should take into consideration when designing levels and worlds, etc.. So, these two games are linked, and tell the same story, but I seperated them because the gameplay in the two parts of the story are too different. My first title is undecided, and pretty much everything overall is undecided beyond the main concept, which I have a good clear idea of what I'm doing. Just to tell you this description may not read too well since I'm writing my idea off the top of my head. And my real description is somewhere else. The main character in the first game is a legendary soldier, someone who has fought in the army since he was ten years old. He spends all of his waking hours relentlessly training for battle and he's so powerful he could destroy a small army all by himself. However, he is starting to question what he is doing as a soldier. He kills countless people and many of his slain enemies aren't even fighting for what they believe in. And while he may hate the opposing side, the people fighting on the opposing side aren't necessarily bad. He doesn't want to kill anymore; he has hurt too many lives with what he has done. Anyway, this is how the story fits into the gameplay: It's a high-speed, stealth-action platformer, something like Sonic meets the 3D PoP games, with heavy stealth mechanics. Of course, the twist is that since the character is morally perplexed, he can't kill too much. You're constantly attacked, but you have to complete your objective of the level without hurting too many people. This makes the player think about how they comeplete the level without resorting to the obvious route of destruction and gory violence. If you do choose to kill everyone in sight, you won't be able to swing your sword as well, your accuracy with a bow is lessened, you won't be able to keep your balance walking across a small walkway high off the ground and you may possibly halucinate. Hmm, that's everything for this game, now for a description if it's sequel: It's called Innocent?. (yes, the title has a question mark) In "Innocent?" you play as two characters. One of the characters, is a young cartoon child, who for some mysterious reason has opened the portals between the real world, (Earth), and a fantasy alternate universe. But that isn't all, the child also has opened up the path between the "realistic" and "cartoon" worlds of the game. The child begins his journey in the cartoon world. Everything is quite innocent and fun, almost like something out of a Saturday morning cartoon. Anyway, you spend the first level of the game learning the core mechanics of the cartoon portion of the game. (where you spend the majority of the time in "Innocent?") It is fairly easy to get around the cartoon world as a kid. Since he's lived there his entire life, and he has his great imagination by his side. Without an imagination, you can't survive in the cartoon world. If you have an imagination, you can do loads of crazy cartoon stuff, like summon falling anvils from the sky onto a small army, or turn into a giant and go onto a smashy smashy rampage. Yes, it will allow for some pretty crazy, fun level design and puzzle design. Anyway, by the end of the tutorial level, the child gets warped into the real world. Soon after that he is kidnapped by a gang. Then starts the first level in the realistic world. Because the child can't rely on his imagination or crazy physics, so he has to rely on stealth to escape from the gang. You spend some time in the realistic world, and the kid comes to the conclusion that the realistic world is much, much, much harsher and filled with more evil than in the cartoon world. The other character is a detective who when you first find him, is trying to track down a criminal gang, in fact, the same gang that kidnapped the kid. Now when he finds the gang, a large part of the plot is revealed. He finds out about the key to opening up these alternate universe, and soon tries to track down the kid. Who made his way back to the cartoon universe. When the adult detective reaches the cartoon place however, he brings trouble. Because of his cynicism, he brings evil monsters into the world. And that doesn't help, since he's more down to Earth, and doesn't have much of an imagination. Please tell me what you think and if you have any questions about the games, feel free to ask.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Advertisement
You may want to read the sticky threads/forum faq for the Game Design and Writing For Games forums. But to cut a long reply short, I must warn you now that you won't get into the industry just with game ideas, no matter how good, nor are they going to help you much if you start off as an artist. And along those lines, you may find that you can work your way up to lead designer via the artist role but - and this is purely speculation on my part - I believe most western games companies look more to programmers and level designers to fill lead design positions. For every artist that became a lead designer I bet you will find about 10 programmers (eg. Richard Garriot, Will Wright, Peter Molyneaux, Chris Sawyer, Chris Taylor, Sid Meier, etc). I think the main problem you're going to face is that to get into the industry, you're going to need to produce evidence that you can contribute something significant to a project. That means something a lot more concrete than ideas.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Start here.

Welcome to the club. I'm finishing the same grade you are, but even now I know that game development is what I'm for. My advice to you is: learn to program. You won't regret it, even if you're an artist. Programming isn't too difficult, though some people make it out to be. Without a programmer, your games will not get made, and if you plan on starting NOW, like me, you'll have to learn to program to get your games made. I advise starting with a simple language like FreeBASIC or Python , and then moving on to C++.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I always have and always will suggest starting out with C++ first, because that is what is used for almost all professional games, including those you stated that you are a fan of! It is more syntactically difficult than the others mentioned, but if you were ever to become a lead designer/artist, you will be able to relate to your programmers better. Plus, it gives you a way to implement some of your ideas and test them out! It really isn't that difficult to learn. Download bloodshed dev-cpp, get yourself a book on it, and start programming! It is a very good experiance, even if you aren't going to be a programmer. Sorry, don't mean to discourage, but Kylotan is correct.

Good luck!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
Original post by silverphyre673
I always have and always will suggest starting out with C++ first, because that is what is used for almost all professional games, including those you stated that you are a fan of! It is more syntactically difficult than the others mentioned, but if you were ever to become a lead designer/artist, you will be able to relate to your programmers better. Plus, it gives you a way to implement some of your ideas and test them out! It really isn't that difficult to learn. Download bloodshed dev-cpp, get yourself a book on it, and start programming! It is a very good experiance, even if you aren't going to be a programmer. Sorry, don't mean to discourage, but Kylotan is correct.

Good luck!


C++ is much better as a second or even later language to learn. Python is becomming a more common suggestion as a first language. I haven't tried it yet, I've only done Java and a bit of C++. You're not going anywhere fast in the industy if you only learn one language, and don't learn how to learn another fairly fast.

I much rather learn the basic concepts on Java than C++, as there are fewer things to go wrong in your code. Python has even fewer.

In short, you should mostly ignore people telling you to start with C++ because "Thats what all the pro's use", as its not quite as bad, but nearly as bad as saying that you should just learn to walk and skip crawling, as walking is what all the adults do, so why waste time crawling?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
Original post by Talroth
C++ is much better as a second or even later language to learn. Python is becomming a more common suggestion as a first language. I haven't tried it yet, I've only done Java and a bit of C++. You're not going anywhere fast in the industy if you only learn one language, and don't learn how to learn another fairly fast.

I much rather learn the basic concepts on Java than C++, as there are fewer things to go wrong in your code. Python has even fewer.


Well, it just means you learn good, solid debugging skills early on in programming. I'm just becomming a Junior in Highschool myself, and I've had previous experience with VB 6.0 (Back in 6th/7th grade) and now I'm starting to learn C++. If you get the right book, trust me, it's really not hard to learn. I'm starting off with a book called "C++ Without Fear" by "Brian Overland." It's well organized and makes everything very logical.

To address this kids situation, because we really have no idea if he wants to become a programmer or not, I'll say the following.
(1) Learn to be organized, no one in a job is going to want a "very disorganized person" working in their establishment.
(2) As for feedback on your game idea... The first idea seems too cliché to me. I don't know, if I were to try to name another game with the same "I don't want to fight anymore!" type of storyline I'm not sure I could. Yet the concept as a whole just seems to be rather cliché. Also, addressing the issue of taking out a small army by himself, every kid loves to see mass destruction or a lone guy being really powerful. Yet, when it comes to gameplay you want something that will be fun and challenging. Not just, GO MY SOLDIER OF DOOOOOOM!!!!!! *Kick, thrash, bash* Time to go to the next map! *Tee hee!* Although it can be fun to see mass destruction every once in awhile, it gets old pretty fast and you'll need to have other ideas for gameplay in store.
In respect to the second game you've listed, it's a much more original idea (Or at least I think so), though again, realistically speaking it's impossible to make a game engine than can instantly spawn any type of item the user wants due to their imagination. Even if it were possible it would again make the game too easy. Oh look, 20 guys running at me... Oops! I just thought up this lovely Gattling Gun! So again, more thought into the details of the gameplay is needed to make a game that's challenging and fun.

Anyways, just a large chunk to think about.
--- Gollum

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
Original post by Gollum1378
Quote:
Original post by Talroth
C++ is much better as a second or even later language to learn. Python is becomming a more common suggestion as a first language. I haven't tried it yet, I've only done Java and a bit of C++. You're not going anywhere fast in the industy if you only learn one language, and don't learn how to learn another fairly fast.

I much rather learn the basic concepts on Java than C++, as there are fewer things to go wrong in your code. Python has even fewer.


Well, it just means you learn good, solid debugging skills early on in programming. I'm just becomming a Junior in Highschool myself, and I've had previous experience with VB 6.0 (Back in 6th/7th grade) and now I'm starting to learn C++. If you get the right book, trust me, it's really not hard to learn. I'm starting off with a book called "C++ Without Fear" by "Brian Overland." It's well organized and makes everything very logical.

To address this kids situation, because we really have no idea if he wants to become a programmer or not, I'll say the following.
(1) Learn to be organized, no one in a job is going to want a "very disorganized person" working in their establishment.
(2) As for feedback on your game idea... The first idea seems too cliché to me. I don't know, if I were to try to name another game with the same "I don't want to fight anymore!" type of storyline I'm not sure I could. Yet the concept as a whole just seems to be rather cliché. Also, addressing the issue of taking out a small army by himself, every kid loves to see mass destruction or a lone guy being really powerful. Yet, when it comes to gameplay you want something that will be fun and challenging. Not just, GO MY SOLDIER OF DOOOOOOM!!!!!! *Kick, thrash, bash* Time to go to the next map! *Tee hee!* Although it can be fun to see mass destruction every once in awhile, it gets old pretty fast and you'll need to have other ideas for gameplay in store.
In respect to the second game you've listed, it's a much more original idea (Or at least I think so), though again, realistically speaking it's impossible to make a game engine than can instantly spawn any type of item the user wants due to their imagination. Even if it were possible it would again make the game too easy. Oh look, 20 guys running at me... Oops! I just thought up this lovely Gattling Gun! So again, more thought into the details of the gameplay is needed to make a game that's challenging and fun.

Anyways, just a large chunk to think about.
--- Gollum


Yes, exactly! And what beginner wants to master python, then learn that they can't apply their new skills very well? Talking to girlfried, g2g. Sorry.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
Original post by silverphyre673
Quote:
Original post by Gollum1378
Quote:
Original post by Talroth
C++ is much better as a second or even later language to learn. Python is becomming a more common suggestion as a first language. I haven't tried it yet, I've only done Java and a bit of C++. You're not going anywhere fast in the industy if you only learn one language, and don't learn how to learn another fairly fast.

I much rather learn the basic concepts on Java than C++, as there are fewer things to go wrong in your code. Python has even fewer.


Well, it just means you learn good, solid debugging skills early on in programming. I'm just becomming a Junior in Highschool myself, and I've had previous experience with VB 6.0 (Back in 6th/7th grade) and now I'm starting to learn C++. If you get the right book, trust me, it's really not hard to learn. I'm starting off with a book called "C++ Without Fear" by "Brian Overland." It's well organized and makes everything very logical.

To address this kids situation, because we really have no idea if he wants to become a programmer or not, I'll say the following.
(1) Learn to be organized, no one in a job is going to want a "very disorganized person" working in their establishment.
(2) As for feedback on your game idea... The first idea seems too cliché to me. I don't know, if I were to try to name another game with the same "I don't want to fight anymore!" type of storyline I'm not sure I could. Yet the concept as a whole just seems to be rather cliché. Also, addressing the issue of taking out a small army by himself, every kid loves to see mass destruction or a lone guy being really powerful. Yet, when it comes to gameplay you want something that will be fun and challenging. Not just, GO MY SOLDIER OF DOOOOOOM!!!!!! *Kick, thrash, bash* Time to go to the next map! *Tee hee!* Although it can be fun to see mass destruction every once in awhile, it gets old pretty fast and you'll need to have other ideas for gameplay in store.
In respect to the second game you've listed, it's a much more original idea (Or at least I think so), though again, realistically speaking it's impossible to make a game engine than can instantly spawn any type of item the user wants due to their imagination. Even if it were possible it would again make the game too easy. Oh look, 20 guys running at me... Oops! I just thought up this lovely Gattling Gun! So again, more thought into the details of the gameplay is needed to make a game that's challenging and fun.

Anyways, just a large chunk to think about.
--- Gollum


Yes, exactly! And what beginner wants to master python, then learn that they can't apply their new skills very well? Talking to girlfried, g2g. Sorry.


From my experiences with Python, it tends to map fairly well into C programming skills, particularly in comparison to the canonical beginner languages.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
From what ive heard, almost every game company requires a previous software
experience on the resume. And since there are so little ways to get experience, there is another way. Programmers can create a "Demo Reel" to show off what they can do with computer graphics. A Demo Reel is a game and is created
individually.

Maybe, an artist can do something like the same to get into the industry,
maybe write a sample storyline with pictures or something like that?

P.S. If im wrong on the demo reel idea please correct me

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Anonymous Poster
First off, if you want to get into design work, get organized. Disorganized designers don't go anywhere fast. Learn to write in a very clear organized fashion. Other people will be using your writings as the guide for building the game. If it's not professional quality, IT'S NOT PROFESSIONAL QUALITY. If you really want in the industry, learn to be a professional.

Design is the hardest door to get into. You have to have something besides cool ideas. Everyone in the industry has a cool game idea or ten lying around. It's the ability to convince others that your idea is cool and feasible and marketable that is important. Your communications skills are your stock in trade. Let me repeat that because it is the most imprtant thing in this reply. As a designer, your communication skills are your stock in trade.

There is a bit of chicken and egg problem, you won't get a design job unless you've designed something cool in the past. I know people who have done mods, others have published board or card games to get the foot in the door in the interview.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  

  • Advertisement
×

Important Information

By using GameDev.net, you agree to our community Guidelines, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy.

We are the game development community.

Whether you are an indie, hobbyist, AAA developer, or just trying to learn, GameDev.net is the place for you to learn, share, and connect with the games industry. Learn more About Us or sign up!

Sign me up!