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I used to use c++ visual studio 6 and DirectX/OpenGL for game projects because it was more or less industry standard. Seems Imve not been keeping up with the times. What is 'industry' standard (not what do you like) now for making 3d large scale commercial games. C#? Still c++? If so unmanaged C++ with vs.net ??? -CProgrammer

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I'm not sure if there is a rigorous "standard" in the industry, but most projects I know of are using unmanaged C++ with Visual Studio .Net for core development, and a high-level scripting language for game logic and such. There does seem to be a growing movement towards C# in game development, but I couldn't name a "AAA" type title off the top of my head that's said to be done in C#. Tools development seems to be largely in managed .Net languages (C#, VB.Net, et. al.) or other very-high-level languages.

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From what I know, most projects are C++ only using either MSVC .NET or Code Warrior (PS2 / GC? ... never worked on anything else than PC / XBOX).

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Unmanaged C++. Don't worry about it so much though, as long as you're getting good results it doesn't really matter what language you're using.

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Guest Anonymous Poster
I used to use VC++ 6, and my company switched to 7.0 and then 7.1. I can tell you that -many- people in the industry prefer the interface in 6.0. It's much more scaled down and to-the-point, and very quick to use if you're the type that likes specially mapped key-bindings and rarely uses the mouse.

The 7.1 compiler is better, better template support, and the debugger does have some improvements... but I can assure you that many game companies would still be using 6.0 if it weren't for the fact that the XDK is only supported on 7.1 (sneaky move by Microsoft!)

Maybe someone will chime in with how to use the 7.1 compiler with the 6.0 interface? (I've heard this is possible, true?)

So, I wouldn't change unless you're doing .NET or managed programming, or you're doing XBox development... Although it never hurts to try it out. Learning new things is never bad.

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I just remembered having heard that some projects are done in unmanaged c++ and use c# as a scripting language. This true?
Any examples?
Betteryet anybody have any articles/tutorials on how exactly this is done? (dll's for communication?)

-CProgrammer

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I'd move with the times and switch to VS.Net, if you have the resources (expensive).

You also need a good source control software (Perforce, Visual Source Safe, Alienbrain, ect...).

VC6 and DirectX is acceptable. That's what I'm stuck with at work (will be moving to VS.Net shortly). But there is little in between really, so no fear.

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Quote:
Original post by Anonymous Poster
Maybe someone will chime in with how to use the 7.1 compiler with the 6.0 interface? (I've heard this is possible, true?)


You can change the IDE so that when you open it up at the beginning, the start screen doesnt show up. You can also move the toolbars around to suit your needs. I loved the VC 6.0 keyboard bindings. So to change from the default bindings to 6.0 bindings, you can go to Tools->Options and hit the Environment tab. In the Environment tab, select Keyboard. At the top there is a drop-down menu titled "Keyboard mapping scheme". Just change it to Visual C++ 6 and youre set!

-DavidR-

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