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ronkelly

rendering techniques

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Hi everyone, I was hoping that someone could outline some techniques that I could use to reduce the interactive rendering time of scene with say, a million polygons?? Cheers

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This is a very generic question but i will try to outline two methods:

First of all:
Frustum culling, being the process of determining if an object is visible in the viewing frustum, this "viewing frustum" is the portion of the world that is visible to the camera, having usually the shape of an quad-based pyramid with it's top(the near plane) placed at the viewer's eye and it's bottom at the so called far plane meaning the maximum distance you can see something.

Second:
PVS, potentional visibility sets, like portals and BSP trees,PVS is like a database providing information of which world subsets are visible from a given position in the world

there is TONS of information on this subject in the net, try looking at the graphics resources and articles here, and of course google is your friend.

Sorry for my terrible english :)

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If you're using D3D, somebody should be along with an answer some time soon, but if you're using Open GL, here's some pointers:

#1 - Use vertex arrays for a non-static scene, and VBOs or display lists for static scenes (people get different levels of performance depending on which method is used). The data should also be ordered reasonably well so the memory is accessed in a stream, rather than in random chunks.

#2 - If you're modifying the visual data in any way, shape or form, see if it can be done using vertex programs (vertex shaders).

#3 - If you plan on using fragment programs (pixel shaders), use them only when necessary.


I've probably missed a few things (not getting enough sleep makes it hard to think), but those ones should help you out a little.

[EDIT]
What lone_ranger said, including this:

#4 - Back-face culling (don't render things you shouldn't see). ;)

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http://www.realtimerendering.com/#speed

3 basic principles:

-hardware friendly implementation
-culling (drawing the absolute minimum)
-Level of Detail (LOD)

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