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Computer simulated "brain" comming soon

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We had some interesting comments about it on this thread. I think most people agree that they still don't have anywhere near the computing power that they will need. But who knows how much computing power you really need?

Anyway, it's hard to argue that the whole thing isn't worth a try. We need to have a Brain v1.0 Beta before we can ever have a Brain v6 Final.

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Hopefully they are modelling the brain of this one guy I know that drinks waaaay too much. They can realistically achieve his computing power. :P

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Well, I know one thing.. Even the 80386 cpus could do multiplications faster than I could ever dream of.. But yeah, there's pretty much to a brain really.. But then.. It sure would be a differense to emulate a 2months old child, or someone like Albert Einstein.. :p

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Quote:
Original post by DvDmanDT
Well, I know one thing.. Even the 80386 cpus could do multiplications faster than I could ever dream of..


That maybe so but the interaction with the physical world that your brain has to deal with is massively computationally expensive. I think the estimate that some people have bandied around is around 100-200 TFLOPS of processing power. To get this sort of processing power in an object the size of a brain is way beyond anything we are capable of today, I think Blue Gene/L is probably 10's of 1000's of times the size of a brain :)

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Guest Anonymous Poster
Quote:
Original post by owl
IBM/EPFL Blue Brain Project

[...]
Over the next two years scientists from both organizations will work together using the huge computational capacity of IBM’s eServer Blue Gene supercomputer to create a detailed model of the circuitry in the neocortex – the largest and most complex part of the human brain. By expanding the project to model other areas of the brain, scientists hope to eventually build an accurate, computer-based model of the entire brain.
[...]


True or advertising?

One way or another, it is an exciting idea me thinks...

I would really like to read some comments from people with knowledge on the subject, and everyone elses oppinion.




Give them a few more decades of Moores Law and they might be able to make a start.

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I'm not sure this is possible. In fact, a brain and a computer ins't the same thing at all and trying to program something like a brain is just impossible since the computer cannot interact with the world like we do with our 5 sense.
Our brain do mutch more that just making calculation. That my opigion.

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I guess the whole experiment is an attempt to "visualize" the way electrical pulses flow trough the neurons and maybe sucha visualization can give a clue about how the hell they work as a whole.

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Its definitly possible to create a simulation of a brain, AFTER we understand how the brain works :D. Even if it requres a physics model of the atoms that make up the brain in order to create an accurate model, it is possible. However the computing power for somthing such as this is out of this world.

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Guest Anonymous Poster
I often see generic references to how the amount of computing power needed to simulate a brain isnt available and I just don't see that as necessarily true.

Facts:

The brain is massively parallel
Neurons are far slower than transistors.

So while the idea that the brain is massively parallel certainly does suggest that current computing power isn't enough, the idea that neurons are so god-aweful slow (I mean really really really really slow) suggests just the opposite.

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