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Prospective Full Sail Student?

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Hey everyone, this is to all the people on this forum that currently, or have attended Full Sail. I have looked in to attending the school for a while now (I've been getting their pamphlets/newsletters/housecalls for well over 3 years now) and I was just starting to decide if I should take the plunge (so to say). As a background of myself, I am an ex-Computer Science Major (5+years of coding experience in C++, Java, and a wee bit of assembly) but I don't have much hands on experience with DirectX or Open-GL programming, and I've been out of school for about two years now. I am currently working for a webhosting company here in New York City as a programmer/Unix administrator, and I have been seriously concidering heading back to school, and even more so, attending Full Sail. I've taken the 'Grand Tour' Of DigiPen, but opted out of attending due to some personal reasons, as well as the fact I just didn't happen to think it was so amazing. I've yet to visit Full Sail (which, of course, I will before making any decisions) but I thought who better to ask then current, alumni, and possible drop outs of the school. For starters, I've heard good things, and I've also heard horror stories, so I was looking for an objective opinion on things ranging from workload (I already know that it will be alot of work, but I'm not afraid to apply myself), social life (if any... I have essentially work and a girlfriend right now, so I'm not looking for much), and other things I should note before taking it to the next step. I'd appreciate as much feedback as possible, and if you have any other questions for me in terms of my abilities and such, so you can make a more enlightened judgement, please do ask. I thank all of you for your time.

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I didnt go there. But I haven't heard much in the way of good remarks about it. If you want a job in game programming you already have what many people consider the best qualifications. I bet you could pick up directx or OpenGl pretty easily considering your backround. This is 99% anecdotal as I have no first hand experience so dont take me too seriously.

Have you ever done any game related programs at all? If not maybe you should try to write a few as a hobby first and make sure game programming is really what ya want(although it sounds like you're already pretty well commited to being a programmer of some sort.)

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So I have not attended Full Sail either, but I am graduating from DigiPen in a month. If you want to learn to make games, and are willing to work hard (which you say you are) then there is no better place in my opinion. I believe the tuition is comparable. If you are interested in becoming a "designer" then Full Sail may be a better choice, as DigiPen graduates developers (but we will soon offer a minor in design). DigiPen has enough cool math classes that they are soon adding a math major to the curriculum, and enough game physics classes to merit a minor. You will write software rasterizers and learn the 3D pipeline in gorey detail. I will not say that Full Sail does not have a place in the industry training game designers, but if you want to develop games then DigiPen is it. You will work on 2 semester long games as a freshman, and 3 year-long games before you graduate. As for being busy, a lot of people do not make it...on the other hand I am married and managed to complete the 4-year program in 3-years. And I am still married. They have an entire math elective dedicated to quaternions! Obviously, I am a fan. You should at least consider it. The website is not the best it could be, but we are currently in the process of reinventing it. Good luck in making your decision.

http://www.digipen.edu

Scott

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Guest Anonymous Poster
If you actually want a job in the industry, DON'T DO IT! We throw out most all resumes coming from FullSail and DigiPen graduates. Get a traditional degree and put forth the effort to learn the game related programming.

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While I worked at 2015, I knew a few people that went to full sail. They all said it was great, but it costs a fortune to complete it.

Unfortunately, As level designers, they are at the bottom of the totem pole by income (along with testers). 6 months ago 2015 closed down and I haven't heared from anyone since, and I'm sure they are all struggling to get a job somewhere else.

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chad_420 - I've worked a bit with some game programming, mostly in BASIC, with a little in C++ and C for some college credits during High School (so a while ago :)). I have tried picking up the books and just learning OpenGL and such on my own, but I find that while a text gives you a good basis, it just doesn't go into the depth that a class would, which is why I am looking to attend a school.

scott_l_smith - Digipen is indeed a good school, just a little too far away from home for my likes. Not saying Florida is next door, just that I know people there so it's a bit easier. I didn't mean to sound like I'm trowing DigiPen out as an idea, just merely testing the water. I am intrigued by your points about the curriculum, as it's been a while since I looked at digipens offerings, so I guess I'll have to take a second glance.

'anonymous' - While I'm not too perceptive as to if thats a 'troll', and by the structure of your sentence, specifically 'Throw-out', leads me to doubt the credibility of your statement, I apreciate the alternative view. Yes, I accept the fact that taking a degree offering geared specifically for one field is a double-edged sword, but I liken it to and kind of trade school. I was attending a University up here for C.S., but had a certain distain for the kind of mentality that comes with it (Imagine, if you will, attending college for your first semester, being locked in 2 senior-to-gradutate level computer science courses,which I loved, but waking up at 6 am to take 'Basics of Geology'.)

Thank you all again for your time

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Quote:
Original post by Anonymous Poster
If you actually want a job in the industry, DON'T DO IT! We throw out most all resumes coming from FullSail and DigiPen graduates. Get a traditional degree and put forth the effort to learn the game related programming.


Completely bias in your decision, and quite honestly I personally wouldnt want to work for a company like yours. It is wrong to throw out resume's because of a school a student went to. You are practially saying ( in a none direct way )that I will only take students that graduate from Harvard. No one else, I don't care how smart or stupid you are, I will only take Harvard students.

In terms of your company, they may benefit from this, but honestly I think you are losing more then benefitting. There is alot more then just the school a student went to.

Why is Fullsail a bad school? You are tought straight Game Programming. You act like students there are learning an acient language that is no longer used... What they learn can be used in everyday life in general applications and ofcourse game dev.

Are those students not taught something that you need in a prospected employee? If so then you simply mention that and say ..well I have noticed that at Fullsail you do no learn this.." ....... ". simple as that, and maybe the cirriculum can be changed. But wouldn't it be smarter to higher some one who has already got game dev skills and teach them smarter coding then teaching someone how to make games and the whole realm of GD.

This is wrong in society, hiring a prospected employee should be a decision based on skill, professionalism and many more details of the employee. NOT ON THE SCHOOL HE/SHE graduated from. Quite frankly I must say that's pretty f** up!

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