Jump to content
  • Advertisement
Sign in to follow this  
Halsafar

Debug Mode Drains all frame time

This topic is 4873 days old which is more than the 365 day threshold we allow for new replies. Please post a new topic.

If you intended to correct an error in the post then please contact us.

Recommended Posts

If I turn on debug mode I go from a smooth 15-20ms/frame to 90-120ms/frame. This is debug mode on level 1. O_o This normal?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Advertisement
Very normal. Don't worry about it - at the end of the day it's there for you to get detailed and precise debugging information from rather than actually play/test your program [smile]

Regular programs compiled under a debug profile (vs "Release" profile) are the same.

hth
Jack

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
In one game we were developing, a tester came to me extremely worried. On one card very old card the game was running at < 1 FPS. I suggested switching to the retail runtime, and voila, 40 FPS. With hardware processing, the hit isn't much. With software processing you'll get a bit more of a hit. With certain cards and/or drivers, your app will just crawl. Don't worry about it.

If you want, before you release, put in a check for debug vs. retail runtimes and warn the user that they may be getting sub-optimal performance using debug runtimes. This should only ever appear on a developers machine. I know I've played plenty of PC games with debug mode enabled without realizing it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
There are several games out there which I play which crash and/or lag on finding DX9 in debug mode.

Battlefield 1942 for example, if you put on the debug mode and play that game it works fine for awhile. Youll join a server, start playing, notice a quite a bit of extra lag and then u get banned by the anti-hack program bunkbuster for having the wrong dll loaded.

Final Fantasy XI just plain old crashs' as it starts.

My game grinds to a crawl...

I think BF1942 use's DX8 tho, so maybe thats why it can make it...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The current MMORPG I'm working on gets 62~FPS in debug mode, and 411~FPS in release mode (Visual C++ 6.0).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
Original post by Namethatnobodyelsetook
I know I've played plenty of PC games with debug mode enabled without realizing it.

I was quite embarrassed after I spent at least an hour trying to "fix" my computer because this game was simply becoming a slideshow. Turned out I'd just left debug runtimes turned on with max validation and max output [headshake]

Jack

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
Original post by jollyjeffers
I was quite embarrassed after I spent at least an hour trying to "fix" my computer because this game was simply becoming a slideshow. Turned out I'd just left debug runtimes turned on with max validation and max output [headshake]

[lol] I was sure that the PC version of Halo was pure crap...then I remembered that I had good ole' debug mode on. Too bad the game put me to sleep after playing the 20 minute Training Level, though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
Original post by jollyjeffers
I was quite embarrassed after I spent at least an hour trying to "fix" my computer because this game was simply becoming a slideshow. Turned out I'd just left debug runtimes turned on with max validation and max output [headshake]

Thank God I'm not the only one.

By the way, I think having a really slow debug version is a sign of good programming. The things that slow the debug runtime down are the same things that keep your code modulated and sorted out. You might want to think about creating a new build profile that runs in debug mode but allows optimizations that don't conflict with the debugging tools.

My game jumps from 90 FPS (11 mspf) in debug up to around 1500 FPS (0.6 mspf). It's mostly due to having so many modulated animation function tasks for characters. It took me about six months to write my character engine, and that time generated a whole bunch of modules, sub-modules, functions, and sub-functions.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
Original post by Jiia
By the way, I think having a really slow debug version is a sign of good programming. The things that slow the debug runtime down are the same things that keep your code modulated and sorted out. You might want to think about creating a new build profile that runs in debug mode but allows optimizations that don't conflict with the debugging tools.

Or that you are a horrible programmer, since the D3D runtime is spitting out 2 billion error and warning messages [wink]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Actually, I confused the two there. My frame rate drops when running debug build of my application, not Direct3D debug runtime. But I always use both. I don't notice much of a change in performance when using the Direct3D debug files over the release versions. I don't think your code would have much to do with the performance of Direct3D functions. That's what I get for posting half asleep. But you're right, it does crawl when the output window is being flooded.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  

  • Advertisement
×

Important Information

By using GameDev.net, you agree to our community Guidelines, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy.

We are the game development community.

Whether you are an indie, hobbyist, AAA developer, or just trying to learn, GameDev.net is the place for you to learn, share, and connect with the games industry. Learn more About Us or sign up!

Sign me up!