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Torque Questions

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Lately I've been concidering buying the Torque engine, and have some questions, and don't trust the Torque website's answers becasue their vague and will say anything to get you to buy. I want to hear it from my peers. Here are my questions. Is it good?: Will I end up using other libraries and forgetting Torque? Is it fast?: Will my applications get hit with a perfromace problem? Is it worth the money?: Will I wish I just used more time or is it worth the cash? I don't plan to sell what I make so royalty stuff doesn't matter.

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My team and I have been working in Torque for several months now and so far we are really impressed with most of what the engine can do.

Whether or not you should get it depends on what kind of game you plan to make, how much experience you have in c/c++ and how much money/time you have to spend.

I would suggest toying around with the free demo for at least a few weeks to see what you can do with it. Half of the power of Torque is its scripting language. Since you said you aren't planning on selling your game you are allowed to download and use the demo of the engine for free. The demo is the same as the retail but doesnt have the engine's sourcecode.

We have found Torque to be very good at fps style games and very easy to get a quick prototype of a game idea up and running. The other nice thing is there are books on torque's scripting language and the private forums and code resources on garagegames are very helpful.

It's well worth the money if you have the extra 100 to spend. Seeing our team all works other jobs full-time and do game dev as a hobby, $100 was no big deal.

What Torque is very good at:
Awesome scripting language
Multiplayer Netcode is really good and easy to use
Very easy to get a game up and running
Handles interiors and exteriors really well
Very fast rendering and addons are available that add lighting effects

What Torque doesnt do so well:
Vehicle collision... this is my biggest complaint about the engine. If you have a fast moving vehicle on your game, like a plane, it can have issues with collision detection. We are working on a fix for our game, but short of adding a new physics and collision system (probably ODE) you have to be careful about what your vehicle can collide with.
Audio - Torque uses OpenAL for audio and some cards seem to have problems playing the sounds in torque at a very low volume. So far this hasnt been an issue for us, but I see it every once in awhile in the forums.

Of course, even if you don't end up using the engine, there is a ton you can learn from it. The source code is huge, but most of it isn't to hard to figure out once you get a feel for what's going on.

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I agree w/ what Selsesstissan has said. If you're looking to save time by spending money, then Torque is the way to go. If you're looking to save money by spending time, then you may want to go another route.

Definitely check out the demo and play with it though, you should be able to form a solid opinion of whether or not you want to purchase the Torque engine from your experiences with it.

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Great, thanks. About your collision thing... is it fixable. Like, is it open source enough that you could make your own collision engine and use it with Torque? I'll look at the demo.

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I think its fixable, we're looking into ways of fixing it now.

If you have the programming know-how then yea, you can basically implement any library you want. You get all the source code when you buy the engine, so you can basically do what you want with it. (Like we are thinking about adding ODE and a newer OpenGL renderer to support more extensions)

Whether or not you have the time and ability to actually do what you want with it is another question.

But really, for a game you're making just for fun or a learning experience give the demo a shot. Then when you hit a point you must make an engine change to make something you want to do work, then decide for yourself if you like it enough and feel its worth the money. Chances are, you may be able to do what you want for a game with just the scripting and content.

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I looked up the legal stuff. So you can sell it witht he Indie liscense as long as your profits are under $250,000, sweet. Great about the open source in case I want to use a betetr audio library or something. Okay, thank you, the demo is greta so far.

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I don't know if they tell you this right off the bat w/ the Torque demo or not, but make sure you press F11 while you're running the demo to get to the tools, and have fun! :)

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Oh wow, I didn't know that. Well, does Torques have it's own file format? Could I archieve and encrypt my resource files and use them with the engine or doe Torque do that on it's own?

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The "ReadMe.html" file included with the Torque demo explains some of the features, including key bindings, and the rest are explained in the help menues which can be accessed by pressing the "F1" key.

TGE uses several file formats for different asset types. For example, scripts are stored in standard text files with a .cs extension and are compiled to byte code files with a .dso extension at runtime.

It is possible to distribute finished games without the .cs files by including the .dso versions instead. You can also store files in .zip archives and change the extension to .vl2 to make it less obvious.

However, neither of these methods is foolproof, as others will have access to the source code and/or know about this.

If/when you purchase a license, you can modify any part of the engine to work differently.

Before attempting to make your files inaccessible, you should ask yourself whether you really want to discourage others from making mods/expansions for your game.

Btw, TGE is not open source. Yes, you get access to the full source code (and any subsequent updates) when you purchase a license, but you are not allowed to make that uncompiled code available to those who have not also purchased a license.

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