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BeanDog

D3DX 8 - blast from the past?

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OK, in DirectX 8, D3DX not only has mathematical and initialization functions, it also allows you to load X files and render them, automatically do animations and some LOD functions. Sound familiar? I thought MS discontinued D3DRM. ~BenDilts( void );

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It does have a lot of similiarities compared with D3DRM, but the difference is that while D3DRM tried to be the entire engine for you, D3DX only tries to assiist in some of the more common functions of engines.

----------------------------------------
"Before criticizing someone, walk a mile in their shoes.
Then, when you do criticize them, you will be a mile away and have their shoes." -- Deep Thoughts

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Yes, Magmai, that''s the point I''m trying to get across. D3DX can now load in whole models - isn''t that what a scenegraph engine does?

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quote:
Original post by BeanDog

Yes, Magmai, that''s the point I''m trying to get across. D3DX can now load in whole models - isn''t that what a scenegraph engine does?


Not really. Scenegraphs are Scene-Graphs. They maintain a listing of the scene and its components, and when the render is called in, they present the information that needs to be displayed.

Scene graphs are wonderful becuase they not only organize, they concatinate. A mesh with 20 submeshes that needs to be rotated is quickly accompilished with one call to the scene graph node/frame for that mesh, which in turn calls all the sub mesh rotation functions by recursion, rotating the object. Clean interface for the main program, and even a clean interface for the code which accompilishes the task.

Scene graphs provide encapsulation. It is usually the feature of the engine to load a mesh, since a frame in the scene(graph) wouldn''t really know what a mesh is. Frames in scene graphs can hold anything really, from meshes, to particle systems, to GUI elements, 2d images, etc.





"Five passengers set sail that day, for a three hour tour, a three hour tour...."

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