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fuchu

3 questions....

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I don't think it would be necessary to post 3 different topics right now... so here are my questions. What could I use those library file thingys called DLLS for? What would be my best thing to use for a game project--a windows type thing? And should I start copying any C++ source I find so I can refer to it? They do say that source files are the best way to learn.

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If you don't have very much programming experience I would say don't worry about DLLs. DLLs are basically files that have lots of code in them, and you can use that code in your own program. You probably won't need to worry about them for a while.

If you want to start a game project, I would first concentrate on learning a programming language (profuse apologies if you already know how to program). Python and PyGame is a great combination for beginners (IMHO at least). C++ and SDL is a bit tougher but can be done as well. Try to stay away from languages like Visual Basic and BlitzBasic. VB is good for applications but not especially useful for games.

Yes, the best way to learn (or at least one of the best ways) is to look at other people's source code. This does not mean that you copy & paste it into your own program randomly. Reading through other people's source can be a great help, but copying and pasting doens't do you much in the way of learning. Also be careful of licensing issues (some people don't like you copying their source code).

Hope it helps!

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DLL's are Dynamic Link Libraries ... theire the same thing as .lib files basicly except that DLL's can be accesed by multiple applications at once ... that's why Windows uses DLL's for instance. They're just some kind of function/class whatever databases which can be accesed by any application which is linked to them. For more detailed information look up a C/C++ Book or tutorial as there are tons of them.

What kind of thing are you talking about ... do you mean if you should use OGL/DX/SDL or GDI or what? Be more precise. ^^

Starting to copy C++ source is (not) the right way ... source can be used to learn from it but only if you know all the elements used in this particular source and know what those elements are for more or less in order to understand how you can use them or how you can use them in a more efficient way than you did till now. But trying to learn by copying source is not the best way in my opinion. First learn the basics of C/C++ and then move on to more advanced topics like Pointers, Classes etc.. As you've got enough confidence when working with those things make an attempt to do something in direction of a game. Without being disappointed if you fail the first, second, third, ... etc. time ^^ always keep on running. :)

If you're already fine with C++ it's always better to skim through some tut's or chapters in a book on a specific topic befor trying to understand a source which handles with this thing you're trying to achieve.




cheers,
Marcel

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One thing you may consider trying is not just copy/pasting code even when it would be OK to do so (from tutorials, for instance). Print the code out (or put it on a second screen, if you have one available), and retype it all by hand. Don't just put in the same code - change it to your personally preferred style, change all the variable and function names as much as possible (without losing meaning, of course), and see if you can rearrange or reorganize pieces of the code to fit your style and design. Doing this will force you to think about what you're writing, and will help reveal how certain things work. Even if you don't change the way the code actually works, just retyping it and putting your own "spin" on it can go a long way towards helping you understand the code. Once you understand it fully, you can reuse the concepts and knowledge in other places - which should be your primary goal in learning.

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Yes, retyping and rearanging code to fit in your own apps is very good, because you learn quite most things by doing so in the beginning.

agree with both of you guys

cheers,
Marcel

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Quote:
Original post by fyhuang
If you don't have very much programming experience I would say don't worry about DLLs. DLLs are basically files that have lots of code in them, and you can use that code in your own program. You probably won't need to worry about them for a while.

If you want to start a game project, I would first concentrate on learning a programming language (profuse apologies if you already know how to program). Python and PyGame is a great combination for beginners (IMHO at least). C++ and SDL is a bit tougher but can be done as well. Try to stay away from languages like Visual Basic and BlitzBasic. VB is good for applications but not especially useful for games.

Yes, the best way to learn (or at least one of the best ways) is to look at other people's source code. This does not mean that you copy & paste it into your own program randomly. Reading through other people's source can be a great help, but copying and pasting doens't do you much in the way of learning. Also be careful of licensing issues (some people don't like you copying their source code).

Hope it helps!


Thanks everyone for telling me things. If anyone is exp. with DevC++ then they know what I mean--maybe about Windows Projects. I am only at OOP in C++, so I won't need DLLS I guess. I WON'T learn VB or Blitz, at least not Blitz. Not VB right now at least. I actually look and TRY to (I aint yelling when I cap. rihgt here, just don't want to deal with the HTML) TO LEARN it and CHANGE it. I never put it in my own. I have learned a few things about how to move left, right, back, up ya know. Thanks.

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