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SticksandStones

Question about C#, VB.net, and the .NET Framework

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Ok, from the way I understand it when you first compile VB.NET or C#.NET code, it compiles into a common language, correct? Then when it runs, it is translated into byte code. Now, assuming that is true, does that mean that the speed of an application written in C# is roughly the same as the same application being written in VB.net? If there isn't a speed difference, what is the purpose of having both languages, or using one over the other? I don't want this to be a VB vs C# debate, I just want to know what differences they have in the end.

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I too have the same question.
Though I have a feeling it's because both languages have different capablitiies such as C# having delegates and allowing non-managed code. While VB.net is more suitable for RAD design and you are able to see at least half your work (visually) before compilation.

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Most of who have had to use VB.net for work and what not would probably agree with you that there is no real reason for keeping it around. The only reason MS even made a VB.net was to keep VB6 programmers happy (and that failed miserably since VB.net is nothing like VB6).

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Quote:
Original post by Gunslinger RR
Now, assuming that is true, does that mean that the speed of an application written in C# is roughly the same as the same application being written in VB.net?
If there isn't a speed difference, what is the purpose of having both languages, or using one over the other?

Yes, the performance is roughly the same but it isn't exact. VB.NET does not put out the exact same MSIL as C# for most applications obviously.

The reason for keeping VB around was because there is already a large userbase for that tool. They radically changed it from VB6 -> VB.NET I hear (I've never used it personally) but it still has the same basic architecture.

So in the end it all comes down to one thing: backwards compatibility with the already installed userbase.

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