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xinvar

OpenGL Material and light settings for a human face

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This is my first post here. I did many searches but didn't get any useful information. I believe people here would have already met this problem before so better ask. I am trying to use opengl material and lighting (simple enough) to give a triangle meshed human face a realistic look -- not necessarily that good, but at least look like a human being. I cannot use textures. I tried this manually for about 3 hours yesterday afternoon without luck. So if anybody could share with me this information I would appreciate very much.

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Is this an assignment? Why on earth couldn't or wouldn't you use textures? Plain old per vertex lighting and materials won't give you a very good effect unless your model is VERY HIGHLY tesselated and rendered in multiple passes. If strictly limited to ogl lighting and materials (no shaders or textures), I would play with the emissive light property a bit and maybe the accumulation buffer to kind of blur it a bit over multiple passes.

Good luck

J

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It's not an assignment. It's part of my research in visualizing DTI (diffusion tensor imaging) on human brain. The model I got from marching cube is VERY HIGHLY tesselated. I did play with emission lighting, and got some very cute nice looking rendering, but just doesn't look like a real human's face.
How to render it in multiple passes? I do know how to use accumulation buffer to make motion blur effects (had a published paper on this :-D), but not sure how to use that to make the rendering better.

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My thought was to use the accumulation buffer to blur the face slightly over multiple passes while giving the face a very slight emissive quality.

Here is a good example of the accumulation buffer usage over multiple passes to achieve depth of field. The same type of technique probably without the depth of field is what I had in mind. Scroll down to the "field.c".

I don't understand how you could have written a paper on an accumulation buffer blur effect and not know how to render multiple passes. That is the whole point of the accumulation buffer and I don't know how else or why else you could or would use it. Do you have a link to the paper you wrote? Sounds like an interesting read....

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Sorry I wasn't clear. Of course I know how to render multiple passes for motion blur, but don't know how to use this to achieve a face with nice make-up. Thanks for the link!

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Quote:
Original post by xinvar
I am trying to use opengl material and lighting (simple enough) to give a triangle meshed human face a realistic look -- not necessarily that good, but at least look like a human being. I cannot use textures.

I tried this manually for about 3 hours yesterday afternoon without luck. So if anybody could share with me this information I would appreciate very much.

With no texturing (or shaders) of some sort you can pretty much forget about it. Human skin is a highly complicated mixture of bumps and colours, coupled with fresnel effects that can vary across the surface, with transluency and sub-surface light scattering adding even more headache to the mix (to a degree the look of skin will depend on what's *under* it and 'behind' it)

You can check CG skin tutorial which goes indepth on what makes skin appear like skin, and how one might try to emulate it. Another file worth checking would be Steven Stahlberg's tutorial which also provide a handful of tips on what makes the skin 'skin-like'. (the latter is probably more useful since it goes more into how to 'fake' the skin appearance through less advanced means)

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Thank you tolaris. But I am not trying to create a skin that can give me a SIGGRAPH paper, just an okay looking would be it. Even the one in Matlab default MRI isosurface rendering would be fine. Besides, I don't want to spend days on this (not my research focus).

Actually, I have to say, the first (starting) image from Steven Stahlberg's tutorial is all I need, becaues in an MRI scan, everybody looks dead :-D

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Quote:
Original post by xinvar
Actually, I have to say, the first (starting) image from Steven Stahlberg's tutorial is all I need, becaues in an MRI scan, everybody looks dead :-D

^,^ in this case, if you can't use textures... you might want to try introducing some kind of fractal variation to base colour and specular strength, by adjusting slightly the 'base' values for individual vertices of the mesh? This can make quite a bit of difference in looks unless of course for some reason you can't use something like that, either...

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