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NMX

Where to go next

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I've been learning ANSI/ISO C++ for the last 10 months or so using 2 books, C++: A Beginner's Guide(Herbert Schildt), and Deitel's C++: How to Program. I was using 2 books instead of one because Herbert Schildt's book explained things in a simple way so I could understand it quickly and easily, but doesn't really give good examples to learn from; while Deitel's book has pretty awesome examples but explains things too hard =/ Now that I'm done reading both and made a lot of console applications of my own using the knowledge that I've gained from those books, I want to move on. As of the moment, I can only program console applications, and I want to move on to games programming. I've searched a lot for a good online tutorial for DirectX 9.0, but I can find none that are good. From what I've gathered, I need to know a bit of Windows programming to start developing DirectX applications. I've looked for books on Windows programming, but I can find none here. I tried to look at the sourcecodes of the example/sample applications included with the DirectX SDK, but it was too complicated to understand. My questions are: 1. Does anyone know any decent DirectX 9.0 online tutorials? 2. Do I need to learn some Windows programming before I start games programming in C++? Thanks in advance.

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Original post by NMX
2. Do I need to learn some Windows programming before I start games programming in C++?


If you are going to do anything other than console games the short answer is yes.

However, there are alternatives out there. I use SDL. It makes getting started with graphics easy - it'll handle the directx stuff for you (it also is crossplatform, meaning you can use it on linux, macs, and others).

If you decide to go the SDL route, look at some of the tutorials at the SDL site to get started.

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Original post by Will F
However, there are alternatives out there. I use SDL. It makes getting started with graphics easy - it'll handle the directx stuff for you (it also is crossplatform, meaning you can use it on linux, macs, and others).


Just so you don't get any misconceptions, SDL_Video (the grahpics part of SDL) is 2D based, where as Direct3d (DX 9.0's graphics part) is 2D. Fortunately for you, you can use Direct3D with SDL! Here's an article that tells you how to do that:
http://www.gamedev.net/reference/programming/features/dx9sdl/

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If you think you're still in the learning stage and arn't confident enough to move onto Direct3D and its concepts yet, I'd suggest you check out either SDL or Allegro for simple 2D graphics programming. It will teach you some more advanced object orientation concepts in C++ along with the basics to using third party APIs. Just do up a simple Pong game using either SDL or Allegro and you'll be well on your way.

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Original post by Oberon_Command

Just so you don't get any misconceptions, SDL_Video (the grahpics part of SDL) is 2D based, where as Direct3d (DX 9.0's graphics part) is 2D. Fortunately for you, you can use Direct3D with SDL! Here's an article that tells you how to do that:


You can also easily use OpenGL with SDL, here are some tutorials.

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1. www.drunkenhyena.com
2. It wouldn't hurt. Personally, I find windows style input handling easier than others. The book for the subject is 'programming windows' by Charles Petzold. It's exceptionally large, and rather hard to find in bookstores. It's also perhaps overkill at this point.

Though you should realise that 'making games' is a far cry from learning directX. If you don't have a firm grasp on some of the concepts often placed at the back of C++ books [inheritance, templates, and the STL] your progress will be much harder.

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