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Wavinator

Non-sim RPG-like town / community building

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Wavinator    2017
I think the idea of how to build up a town from an RTS perspective is well known. What about from a more personal RPG-like perspective? What sort of town / community changing gameplay might be done in an RPG-like (non MMO) game whose focus is on character interaction? I'm assuming that the town causes changes in the world, and that those changes are reacted to by characters or communities in that world (such as other towns, bandits groups, pilgrims, etc.) EDIT: I've posted a very short summary & refocused this, see about 19 posts down. [Edited by - Wavinator on July 1, 2005 2:42:27 AM]

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ops    104
hmm .. lesee.

establish a system of private property rights. players develop properties nd derive benefits therefrom. players could form consortiums to develop larger projects. sortof like a sophisticated monopoly ?

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-=Editted because it didn't make any sense=-

You'd need to use interpersonal activity to take the place of the point-and-click interface of the RTS.

SInce this is an early reply, I'll be a little unreasonable and present an extreme view to facilitate dialectic.

I'm assuming that the community will shift with or without your direct input, making decisions, building structures, and establishing policies even if you don't tell it to.

If the community is a largely autonomous unit, then it will be developing based on whatever criteria it uses to perceive needs and opportunities. If the population is growing due to an influx of refugees, it will build more residences and produce more food. If there are rich strains of ore nearby, it will build refineries and factories to process it. This will happen without you.

Your character, then, as a member of the community, would be involved with these decisions depending on your station. If you're the mayor, then you have a lot of influence over what gets built, but you have to take into consideratin the SimCity-like issues of "breaking" the community with bad choices. If you're further down the chain of command, like a member of the School Board, you'll have to use political pressure to make certain needs seem more salient than others.

If you spend a lot of time talking to your neighbors about the lousy funding the local research station gets, then perhaps that will ripple up to someone who matters, and the RanD sector of the local academy will get a cash injection.

The choices you make in conversation and the topics you choose to discuss with various NPCs would be your impact on the social structure. High charisma, high intelligence, an imposing presence or a good reputation could all impact your effectiveness.

This same mechanic might serve to affect your reputation, so if you're seen as a smart politician, a shrewd businessman, or an insightful commentator, you could get a public office, a corporate chair, or a radio show, all of which could facilitate your particular style of social activism.

I see this as tweaking a network, rebalancing the scales of various criteria. If you can come up with a robust, simple system (an aptitude you've demonstrated in the past), then it could work not only for the player character, but for the nemesis character(s) as well. If you see a community behaving strangely, you could perhaps identify the influence of one of your ancient enemies.

[Edited by - Iron Chef Carnage on June 29, 2005 10:54:27 PM]

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Fournicolas    270
Now, if you WANTED, which is clearly NOT the case here, to implement this in a RPG world, a possibly MMO RPG, you could try to go the "permadeath-lineage" route. Let me explain. Everybody in the game would have relatives, that is granted, since even when you START the game, you have a father and a mother, and possibly some loony uncle that keeps dribbling seating in his corner...

Now, what you COULD do, if you were interested in this kind of things, is create a sort of treelike interaction chart for ALL the relatives. Let's say that, in this game, you have a family house, right? and in this house, you have to make your WHOLE family fit in snuggly. When you tend to be richer and/or have too many people in your family to fit in your house, you may choose to move to another, bigger house and sell your former estate.

Obviously, the average mission would be "go get some parsley from old Mrs. Bungey over windmill road..." or "our barney has gone missing for a whole day now, see if you can find that stupid dog...".

But the more you kept in a neighbourhood, the more you would have chances to link your mission tree to twine with the neighbours mission trees. And you would get some things like "'Pa got drunk tonight. Again. And he got to fight Mr Winslow. Again. Now if you would be so kind as to go over to Mr Winslow and tell them we're ALL sorry for 'Pa's attitude, you would be so kind..."

And maybe, when it's time enough in the neighbourhood, you can get bigger missions, and some dangerous ones, like:

For more than two months now, men have been missing. Disappearing. And after some Watch enquiries, they tend to have been last seen in or around that pub. And now your father is missing and I am scared. I know you're a good boy. I'd like you to go and try to find something. But I'd also like you to come back, son, eh? Don't go putting yourself in danger."

And it turns out someone in the neighbourhood is a dangerous bastard, and is setting a zombie army to overthrow the local lord, or is dead jealous, and kills anyone going even remotely close to his lover. And obviously, at that time, every playing character in the neighbourhood gets the same kind of mission, only one of them will get to FACE his father, when he learns the truth, or to face the rest of the players. And that should create grudges, like "That Bigglesworth bastard son killed your father and your brotehr. Now you got to avenge them. And if not directly, then you can hurt them. Go and kill ANY member of that family, and bring me a lock from their head, to burn on the family altar... And some of their blood too." (well? everybody can't be completely sane, can they?)



But of course, that would be in a RPG setting, requiring MANY people playing in the same area, and possibly more people playiong AROUND the area, in short, a MMO setting. And that was CLEARLY NOT what was evoked in the OP, right?

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I have a game design project that I am working on that has a somewhat related concept of community building. I'm not sure if it will interest you at all but here it is anyway.

Various factions attempt to control areas containing small human populations. The population is independent from the players in the game and functions on its own in a fairly simplistic manner. The focus of the game here is not community building but it comes in to play in two basic ways. The first is the overall sympathy of the human population to the faction and the second is the ability to "build" in an area you control. Now the building I have planned is very limited in that you can only choose from a list of functions and convert existing structures into ones that support those functions. These construction projects are going to be focused on gaining an advantage over the enemy factions rather than say helping the human population there. The faction can gain sympathy by keeping the human population safe, building defenses and actually fighting to protect the people and loses sympathy by killing people or letting them get killed while in control of the area. There are some benefits to greater sympathy such as increased resource production and possible increased defense, but that is more related to the larger game as a whole. In short the interaction is limted to the sympathy the human population feels for the various factions and to the ability to do some simple construction. The goal being to maintain control of the area and sympathy and construction making that goal easier to achieve.

I hope that wasn't too confusing, and although the interaction is limted, hopefully it will still be interesting.

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Wavinator    2017
Quote:
Original post by Fournicolas
But of course, that would be in a RPG setting, requiring MANY people playing in the same area, and possibly more people playiong AROUND the area, in short, a MMO setting. And that was CLEARLY NOT what was evoked in the OP, right?


Wow, that certainly sounded like an interesting experience. But you're right, I DEFINITELY don't want to pin ANY hopes on an MMO, because that's just pie in the sky unless you've got lots of money or are well connected (the same thing). There are far too many developers glutting the MMO space, including multimillion dollar companies, so I think a wise move is to stay out from under foot of elephants. Correction. I think you're a FOOL not to stay out from under foot of elephants.

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Wavinator    2017
Quote:
Original post by ops
establish a system of private property rights. players develop properties nd derive benefits therefrom. players could form consortiums to develop larger projects. sortof like a sophisticated monopoly ?


Are you thinking they would somehow have to organize the consortium?

Maybe it would be interesting to have a voting system amongst NPCs. Each can offer an area of expertise or financing, and you have to help them get what they want before they'll go in on a project with you.

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Terlenth    300
I've been working on a system that is very similar to this. Actually this started out as a summer project of mine to just create an PVP-MMORPG design document. And, only the design document, I'm not stupid enough to think I can actually create one. Or at least not yet =P.

But, I have been doing the design in a very object oriented way. Where I am flushing out the systems first and then combining them.

So on to the actual idea. Basically, the idea that I had was that within a community there is a basically a leader whom has control over the land that you stake claim in. This leader can design the area to fit what he/she deems would work, all through a top down display of the area. So, overall it would be very much like an RTS.

Once something is scheduled to be built, by the leader, then the member's of the community will get a prompt stating the new job that needs to be done. Then the members of the community can work basically from the ground up on that project.

This part is still a little rough, seeing as I haven't decided on how they would work on each project and how interactive it would be, etc. But, the basic idea is that each person in the community will have their own profession which they learn and thrive of of. For example, a member could be a hunter, mason, doctor, etc.

--Ter'Lenth

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Trying to read a little into your design, it seems that this system would have to be highly scalable, since you'd have to be involved in social situations ranging from four-man reconnaisance expeditions to starship crews to galactic empires.

That being the case, you'd need a simple, robust structure that can be used in all these circumstances, and that can be "fudged" so that it looks as though every shoemaker in every town has weighed in on galactic matters.

How about a pyramid chain of command? Each person would be responsible for the handful underneath him (like a captain for his crew, a President for his cabinet, or a father for his children), having to take their best interests to heart in all matters. Simultaneously, he would have to follow his immediate superiors (Captain->Admiral, President->Emperor, Father->Town Mayor).

Subordinates have some influence over superiors in the form of feedback, morale issues, and other important concerns that would be relevant to any leader. Superiors directly influence their subordinates by issuing orders or setting policy.

This provides a large "ladder" for you to climb, so you can start out as a newspaper delivery engineer and work your way up to Imperator by earning regard and stepping up a little at a time. It might take many lifetimes, but I think you will be equipped for that.

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Symphonic    313
Quote:
What sort of town / community changing gameplay might be done in an RPG-like (non MMO) game whose focus is on character interaction?


Focus is on character interaction.

I'd like to interpret this as meaning, the player's job is to facilitate the building of a primarily NPC community by having conversations with and performing actions for the NPCs.

As has been mentioned, the structure of any given community will be goal based, they need to fulfill their needs as efficiently as possible, so begin by developing a model of their needs.

I'd start like this:
Each NPC has four needs: food, shelter, entertainment, and 'self-fulfillment'

For purposes of providing interest each NPC may have a degree of skew within the sources of each category, for example, I've indicated that males prefer meat as food, but this does not mean you won't find a vegetarian male, it just means they're rare.

Sources:
Food: fruit collected from trees, grains collected from farming, meat collected from hunting, male NPCs show preference for meat (they get higher relative gains from it), females for fruit (same again)

Shelter: Houses, fitting of the environment (tents are unsuitable for snowy mountains), more cosmopolitan NPCs will prefer taller structures, more rustic NPCs prefer bungalows

Entertainment: Very variable, this is something along the lines of a happiness quota for each character. Every NPC has a mapping of stuff that they can do to the happiness they gain from it, for example, a character who enjoys combat is well suited to a hunting position in the community, because that will maximize her utility to the community and her entertainment at the same time. A character who enjoys manual labor will be happier building houses than delivering parcels to and from neighbouring towns.

Self-Fulfillment: Generally speaking a character becomes fulfilled by performing constructive actions, this is separate from entertainment because every character makes equivalent gains from just doing what they do. Some interesting examples: Females get lots of fulfillment from having children and caring for them, males get lots of fulfillment from defeating agressors (this could be complicated, think bandits in the woods, or dangerous animal attacking farmers)
everyone gets fulfillment from providing necessary resources to their family/community.

I'm going to hand-wave the actual implementation ideas behind this, I'm sure it's self-evident that this is a processor intensive problem, and gossip networks are very inefficient for solving group planning problems (but aside from modelling all of the characters in a town as one AI, gossip is about the best you'll do), however, one thing that's often overlooked is that it's ok to let NPCs act like they're thinking about what to do. If you can effectively distribute planning calculations over several frames it may look really convincing as the NPCs discuss with each other about who will do what in order to house everyone and provide food, and get together at night and dance in the town hall (entertainment).

Some evolutionary algorithms could be included in this model. Let Females and Males be more disposed to reproduction when they are happy, so farmers in densely forested lands which are rife with wildlife may be less happy than hunters, so the population will skew towards hunters until there are fewer farmers and what little land there is to farm provides ample entertainment for them.

The player's place in this model is to do whatever he wants, and provide useful goods/services to the NPCs, or assist in their planning what they will do. Inventing an interface for a player to interact with a decision making AI, while it is trying to make a decision would be really really cool.

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Guest Anonymous Poster   
Guest Anonymous Poster
Well, if you mainly want to see RTS style city building from an RPG perspective, you simply need to incorporate the needs & advantages of building the various structures into your RPG storyline. I think this is a neat idea.

Is this game going to be in 1st/3rd perspective? If so I would also incorporate interiors for the buildings that players can explore, or possibly even decorate etc. I would play this.

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TechnoGoth    2937
The way I see it community building comes under three categories property, people, and tasks. I’ll use examples from the game idea I had which included this.

So its starts off where you have a single plot of land with the log cabin you grew up in on it. Now each plot of land can hold a single structure. So in order to expand you need to purchase more land, which in turn requires you to raise your nobility rank. Once you complete your first task for a noble you receive the lowest nobility rank which entitles you to own 4 plots of land, which you then buy from your local lord. Now you have three new plots of land. Problem is that they are covered with trees since you live in a forest, which is fine if you want to go hunting or foraging but you want to build a settlement so you need to have them cleared. In order to have the land cleared you need to either higher or recruit a lumber jack.

So while he’s busy clearing land you decided to expand your home, which of course requires you to recruit or higher a builder. Now expansions take the form of extensions or new floors, however there is only so much space on a plot so you may need a free adjacent plot to add expansions once a structure grows too large. There is a wide verity of expansion and the ones available depend on your tech level and the structure you are expanding. For the players house there are effectively two paths they can follow to expand it, headquarters or family mansion. These can be mixed and the paths really only reflect the building’s purpose and the fact that some expansions requiring prerequisite expansions. ie you need an armoury and a barracks before you can build a war room. For now you have decided that you have a man power shortage, and decided that the best course of action is to build a 6 bed dorm which allows you to recruit an additional 6 NPCs since most won’t join you if you can at least provided them a place to sleep.

Now that your land has been cleared you can start building new structures but wait what do build? Well that brings us to people.


People consist of NPC you have recruited to your cause and their families if any, they are what make up your humble little community. NPCs have their own skills, occupations, and abilities that make valuable members of the community they also tend need certain structures to be of use. Currently you’ve recruited a merchant and an alchemist, so you decided to build a shop and laboratory, and assign the two NPCs to those structures. Fast forward a bit and you now have two NPCs with places to pursue their occupations. Now normally they would start providing you with benefits but sadly, NPCs can be a grumpy sort so the first things these two do is show up at your door with a list of demands. The alchemist wants a library, a room to store his rare materials and items, and a bedroom. The bastard thinks he’s too good to sleep in the dorm with the rest of your people. The merchant on the other is complaining that he has nothing to sell and no one to sell it to, and he wants some money to go on a trade expedition.

It’s about this time you begin to wonder why you built a shop in the middle of a forest for only three people in the first place. But oh well, it might be worth it later. Since you have no reason to refuse your follower request you give them what they want. You’ve done so much construction lately you are beginning to wish you had a recruited a builder, no worries you can always go off and try and find one. Your alchemist has one final demand and that is he would like some rare ingredients that he needs to do his work which brings us to tasks.


People need rare items in order to create new opportunities or gain new abilities. The Alchemist in fact is just a trainee as such can’t actual do anything yet, unless you count turning dirt into mud. But fortunately he’s found a list of rare items in his book “The ABC’s of alchemy” which includes such rare items as newt eyes, and royal jelly. If you get him those things he can start performing alchemy and creating things for you. He also wants a copy of “Don’t touch that – an apprentice’s guide to alchemy” which will allow him to train to an apprentice alchemist. So off you go adventuring in search of fame and glory. You also can search for those things that the alchemist wants or just get away from his complaining for a while.

Well that’s about it. It’s all from the point of view of a leader but there is no reason it couldn’t be done from the point of a regular citizen.







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ops    104
apologies to wavinator, detesting dungeons nd dragons the closest we evr got to the RPG was a pen nd paper effort calld AD2300.

we misread your post as seeking ways of getting playr characters to interact in the actual building of a town. like a multiplayer sim city.

the othr posters here seem well up to the task of considering believable NPC based event generators.

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Wavinator    2017
Quote:
Original post by Iron Chef Carnage
You'd need to use interpersonal activity to take the place of the point-and-click interface of the RTS.


Agreed. At a minimum, this means imbedding permissions and requirements for building / demolishing structures into character interactions, problem solving and relationship balancing.

The next phase would have to involve gameplay related to populating the structure. If you create a thieves den, for instance, or a ranger headquarters, this needs to create an effect. It should probably have strategic options, as well. (Easier to say here than to concoct, though...)

Quote:

I'm assuming that the community will shift with or without your direct input, making decisions, building structures, and establishing policies even if you don't tell it to.


Right, but SLOWLY, so you have a chance to participate. I don't want the world being pulled out from under you otherwise you'll give up in disgust.

Quote:

Your character, then, as a member of the community, would be involved with these decisions depending on your station. If you're the mayor, then you have a lot of influence over what gets built, but you have to take into consideratin the SimCity-like issues of "breaking" the community with bad choices. If you're further down the chain of command, like a member of the School Board, you'll have to use political pressure to make certain needs seem more salient than others.


I see what you're saying, but it would be important to keep the micromanagement out of the picture. This is the same problem you've told me about before, in that the factors can't become so dominant that it hijacks the game.

So anything to do with balancing, management or what have you, must be character interaction problems.

Quote:

The choices you make in conversation and the topics you choose to discuss with various NPCs would be your impact on the social structure. High charisma, high intelligence, an imposing presence or a good reputation could all impact your effectiveness.

This same mechanic might serve to affect your reputation, so if you're seen as a smart politician, a shrewd businessman, or an insightful commentator, you could get a public office, a corporate chair, or a radio show, all of which could facilitate your particular style of social activism.


Would you see this as a matter of raising relationships by winning conversation tests / puzzles?


Quote:

I see this as tweaking a network, rebalancing the scales of various criteria. If you can come up with a robust, simple system (an aptitude you've demonstrated in the past), then it could work not only for the player character, but for the nemesis character(s) as well. If you see a community behaving strangely, you could perhaps identify the influence of one of your ancient enemies.


[grin] I dunno, I'm kinda flailing on this one. But thanks for the vote of confidence!

Seriously, I can imagine network balancing conceptually, but the action moment to moment doing escapes me. I can see SimCity and Starcraft, but those are distractions because they tear away the aesthetic of community / relationships and replace it with spreadsheet management and timing.

So the actual gameplay of balancing a network has to be ? (Not expecting you to answer all this, its just what I'm struggling with)

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Wavinator    2017
Quote:
Original post by Terlenth
Basically, the idea that I had was that within a community there is a basically a leader whom has control over the land that you stake claim in. This leader can design the area to fit what he/she deems would work, all through a top down display of the area. So, overall it would be very much like an RTS.

Once something is scheduled to be built, by the leader, then the member's of the community will get a prompt stating the new job that needs to be done. Then the members of the community can work basically from the ground up on that project.


Do you see this as (or are you interested in) capturing the feel of people ("community-ness") or would you feel this is more a strategic management experience?

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Wavinator    2017
Quote:
Original post by Iron Chef Carnage
How about a pyramid chain of command?


If I were Oprah you'd get a new car! [lol] Nice. So you'd be dealing with the head honcho and his staff at each level. The boxes in the org chart would change, the characters in them would have differing relationships and motives, and the power scale would go up (defenses, cost to influence, etc.)

But it'd be the same repeatable experience. Perfect.

I'm wondering if a solution would be to blend a bit of what Ter'lenth and others here have proposed with this, in that you've got a couple of these chains of command in a given community, representing different interests vying for power. Each person has the power to either create, destroy, improve, or degrade a "community thing." The "community thing" could be food supplies, or electricity, or even taxes.

So maybe the interesting gameplay arises out of a figuring out who has what agenda, how close they are to completing it, and then helping their foes stop them? It's very political, so which may describe the essential soul of a community.

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Wavinator    2017
Quote:
Original post by Symphonic
Focus is on character interaction.

I'd like to interpret this as meaning, the player's job is to facilitate the building of a primarily NPC community by having conversations with and performing actions for the NPCs.


Right.

Quote:

As has been mentioned, the structure of any given community will be goal based, they need to fulfill their needs as efficiently as possible, so begin by developing a model of their needs.


Let me challenge the idea for just a second. Some time ago I thought the answer to this might be a detailed, continuously running model. But while you need a model to determine points of interaction and to map how change happens, I think that a simulation will not scale well, and exposes to the player forms of undesirable leverage that you have to develop AI to compensate for.

Rather than a fluid system that lets the player disrupt the economy, say (very cool for one town, impossible for 50), why not focus on significant change and build the gameplay to reflect an ability to "change the town significantly in this way or that." So more event driven than simulation driven.

I like the highly modeled approach, but it's resource intensive (and I'm sure Oblivion will beat me before I can ever get anything done [rolleyes])

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Wavinator    2017
Quote:
Original post by Anonymous Poster
Well, if you mainly want to see RTS style city building from an RPG perspective, you simply need to incorporate the needs & advantages of building the various structures into your RPG storyline.


Unfortunately, the storyline stretches too far for this to make sense (god's playing with the destiny of mortals over lifetimes to escape death, essentially).

Quote:

Is this game going to be in 1st/3rd perspective? If so I would also incorporate interiors for the buildings that players can explore, or possibly even decorate etc.


Yes, I think that when you put the buildings down, you should be able to interact with them from a RPG perspective. Customizing the interiors should be possible to some degree, though that depends on how easy technologically it is to come up with a framework for mixing and matching interior level props.

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Wavinator    2017
Quote:
Original post by TechnoGoth
Now that your land has been cleared you can start building new structures but wait what do build? Well that brings us to people.


Okay, as interesting as the building is, let's zoom in on this element. People and their needs. What if the needs didn't arise solely from the buildings / environment, but more arose from suggested interactions with one another.

I think all the stuff about different people in different jobs needing different things is cool, but just feel that it drags things more into micromanagment (which I'm not opposed to, it just doesn't capture the feeling of "community.")

What, for instance, if the alchemist thinks the merchant is a warlock and begins agitating against him?

What if the merchant sold the alchemist bad potion ingredients that blew up in his face, and now the merchant wants revenge?

I think I'm getting closer to a possible goal here: Strictly speaking, communities aren't defined by their buildings, they're defined by the relationships of the groups. The buildings may act as modifiers, but it's how the people interact that gives a community a certain soul (think Salem during witch trials versus a Greek city state during Plato's time).

If you were to mix your idea of needs based on buildings & job function with these little conflict interactions, I think THAT might be a sweet way of capturing the feeling of community.

Quote:

People need rare items in order to create new opportunities or gain new abilities.


Okay, this inspired something else. What if people needed certain things to create EVENTS in the game world? Your gameplay would be more about generating events and switching states than micromanagement.


(btw, I like your idea, it just goes away from the essence I'm trying to capture)



Quote:
Original post by ops
apologies to wavinator, detesting dungeons nd dragons the closest we evr got to the RPG was a pen nd paper effort calld AD2300.

we misread your post as seeking ways of getting playr characters to interact in the actual building of a town. like a multiplayer sim city.

the othr posters here seem well up to the task of considering believable NPC based event generators.


No problem, appreciated anyway!

[Edited by - Wavinator on July 1, 2005 2:11:52 AM]

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Wavinator    2017
Summarizing & Refocusing This A Bit

If you want to keep the focus on people, I'm starting to think community / town altering MUST center on affecting different people who are in the process of trying to create an event. The rising event can literally be anything, and can range from little stories that flesh out the world to changes that affect the player.




Simulation vs. Event Driven
Simulations are very cool, but tie the system to results which can be disrupted by the player. They're also resource intensive to design AND run.

If you have many, many towns, rising events might serve better. When the player leaves a town on the other side of the world, you stop firing events, save them, then extrapolate when they return.

Events could be categorized by area of effect and dependencies. Dependencies could be things like "enough iron ore" or "his majesty's permission", as in "to build this hall, we need enough iron ore and his majesty's permission." What's good about this is that it doesn't expose to the player exactly how much iron ore there is.

You now are spared the difficulty of a town that would depend on an ecosystem that could get out of whack.




Tiny Stories
"I think the merchant is trying to poison me" or "we need to drive out all of these communists" both could be rising events.

Each would only be a matter of time, not dependencies. But if the event did have dependencies ("I need to get a scanner to see if the merchant is trying to poison me"), I'd say that should be the event itself. That way, it can separately vett itself.




What's The Gameplay?
Still working this out, but I'm seeing standard RPG faire that ties into strengthening or weakening the event. Talk to people, gather items / evidence, get resources, etc.

The downside of this idea is because it's not a system, it's deterministic (like a fixed quest). This is bad because two similar events can't be solved with the same inputs.

So maybe events should be hooked into very simple dependencies, such that changing some world state (killing a character, increasing some resource) always impacts the event? This could mean softening it, or making it worse, but never removing it.

Example: "The loss of the west bridge to mutants has cut off our food supply!" Solution is either bring in enough food for X people every Y days, or take out the mutants.

Thoughts?

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Terlenth    300
Quote:
Original post by Wavinator
Quote:
Original post by Terlenth
Basically, the idea that I had was that within a community there is a basically a leader whom has control over the land that you stake claim in. This leader can design the area to fit what he/she deems would work, all through a top down display of the area. So, overall it would be very much like an RTS.

Once something is scheduled to be built, by the leader, then the member's of the community will get a prompt stating the new job that needs to be done. Then the members of the community can work basically from the ground up on that project.


Do you see this as (or are you interested in) capturing the feel of people ("community-ness") or would you feel this is more a strategic management experience?


I'd have to say that I'm trying to capture the feeling of a community. In actual life you have to work your way up the ladder, you have to follow the instructions of others, etc.

--Ter'Lenth

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