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Fixxer

C++ Compilers

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Fixxer    100
Ok, I have three choices for C++ compilers. Dev C++ Borland C++ BuilderX VC++ 2003.NET my question is, is VC++ 2003.NET really that much better than Borland or Dev C++? Given that DevC++ is free, is it worth upgrading to Borland or VC++?

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MaulingMonkey    1730
First off:

1) Dev C++ isn't a compiler, it's an IDE. You can download it in conjunction with GCC, which is the compiler.

2) You can download for free the VC++2k5.NET beta compiler, IIRC. I really should bookmark the location for that for when people ask about this kind of stuff :3.

My 2 cents:

They all have their pros and cons. AFAIK Borland's C++ compilers arn't particularly standards compliant, causing some problems if you want to use the boost libraries with them, for example (some work, some don't).

Given that you seem to be new, I'd suggest simply starting out with Dev C++ - you can allways buy a commercial compiler later, once you know the differences and realize you want a feature out of Microsoft's compiler.

Plus, if you wait until you know you need it, chances are Microsoft will have released a newer compiler, meaning you'll get a more up to date version than if you buy it now.

</My 2 cents>

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Fixxer    100
I have Dev C++, VC++ 6.0, Borland C++ builder X and VC++ 2005 Express beta all currently installed. The VC++ 's are trials. Dev C++ and Borland were free. Im just wondering if its worth it for me to spend that extra money, if the difference is really that much. Im pretty new, im just getting into the windows API and DLL files etc. Direct X is an annoyance :-P

I love the visual C++ IDES. 6.0 is my favorite compiler but it will soon be way too out of date, buying it would be impractical. My main concern is the end result, the exe file. Ive been doing all my web design in notepad for 2 years, what an IDE that is :-P so thats not my main concern.

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PaulCesar    524
the newest VC compiler is probably by and large the best compiler out there (for windows) as far as optimizations go, and i believe it is free aswell (the compiler... not the ide) At home I use a microsoft compiler with something over eclipse, and it works great (and free). At work we are running V.NET 2003. To reiterate though, microsofts newest compiler offers the best optimizations you are likely to ever see for the windows platform, including something similar to a compile time version of javas hotspotting (alot of differances so im sure alot of people will argue the actual validity of this, so if someone has a nicer explanation your welcome to clairify) I also have the C++EXP2005 compiler... which is great... alot of odditys configuring the beta 2 version I hear though, and i havent used it too too much.

Borlands compilers are IMHO out of date, unsteady, and dont optimize as well as microsofts. To my recollection leave them out of anything unless you want super-speedy BDE compatibilty or fear erronious delphi code (of course using C++ this should not be a problem)

Also to look into intels compiler, as it fills a nice space in between microsofts and GCC and allows for you to compile on a variety of intel machines. Though honestly I dont know the foothold they will have anymore with microsoft switching to a PowerPC based architecture.

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Helter Skelter    332
Quote:
Original post by Fixxer
Ok, I have three choices for C++ compilers.

Dev C++
Borland C++ BuilderX
VC++ 2003.NET

my question is, is VC++ 2003.NET really that much better than Borland or Dev C++?
Given that DevC++ is free, is it worth upgrading to Borland or VC++?



Dev-C++ is a great IDE. Very simple to use and well supported.

I used Borland exclusively until 97. Dropped them for reasons I won't drudge up. I hear good and bad things about them. Can't say much since I don't keep up with their products.

VS++ 2003.NET is my primary set of dev tools. took a little getting used to when I migrated from VS 6 but after I got over the initial hurdles I was MORE than happy. Well supported, fast, optimizing, and full of great features (more than you will probably ever use).


There's also Watcom C++. This used to be considered by most THE defacto standard for game development. Sadly there just wasn't enough room for all the compiler makers and it just kind of faded away. Was released as Open Source in 2002 and has been in active development since. It's up to V1.3 and is free - ide, compiler, assembler, linker, etc. Check: http://www.openwatcom.org


My personal preference is VS.NET. I just absolutely love it but it can be costly (if you go the MSDN subscription route).

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Fixxer    100
Well im buying the N3D SDK, and it runs on DevC++ and VC++ 6.0 for sure, and they are testing it on VC++ 2003 so im thinking maybe ill use devc++ until my birthday and then get VC++ 2005 then. Hopefully they will suport VC++ 2005 by that time.

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