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Helter Skelter

Which do you prefer?

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If you browse the net for programming resources you're bound to notice that there are a lot of languages that have their roots in C. Since most of these languages are either intended for scripting or operate in a sandbox environment they usually lack features of the C language such as pointers, unions, and/or structures. There are various reasons for this and langauge features are generally at the mercy of the individual or group that maintains the compiler (or scripting engine). The interesting thing is that C++, Objective-C, Java, and C# all have a considerable number of common traits. Being derivatives or supersets of C that isn't exactly earth shattering (insert favorite Marvin the Martian quote here). Even though they all share a common set of traits those traits are usually accessed very differently from one language to another. In Java you have the "final" modifier but in C# it's "sealed". Would it be better if we just renamed them both to "frozen" or "locked"??? In C# you access the base class through "base" while in Java it's "super". C# has "virtual" and "overload" where in Java overriding a base classes methods are implicit. Then of course you get into classes, interfaces, type/reflection information, and others. You also have features that only appear in one of the languages. So given all the differences in grammar which approach or keyword do you prefer? This isn't about which language is better or worse. Why makes a keyword in one language more appealing that another...even if both keywords represent the same concept. base vs. super typeof vs instanceof explicit and implicit behaviors AND we have a bonus round: In 1 word or more describe why you think octal should continue to be supported! (And no just because the Ancients used base-8 math doesn't mean it should be supported)

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I don't prefer keywords over others so much that I'd chose to program in a different language because of this . . . as long as the keywords make sense I guess *g*
The languages you listed are actually distinct from each other, partially having focus on different things. So, it's okay to have some different keywords in different languages, no need to rename them. You can better distinguish the languages codes at first sight. Languages are mostly chosen because of what they are, for the task that has to be accomplished, not because of better sounding keywords, I hope *gg*

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Yes, I would have to say the keywords play very little role in it. The main attractor/detractors are the resources available to each language, like the frameworks for Java and C# or the code base available for C/C++. How these allow you to program make a very large difference on your experience with the language, and have much more weight in preferences (at least to me).

For instance, part of the reason I despise Java is because I spent days tracking down an undocumented bug in Java's sound playing capabilities. I thought I was doing something wrong for most of it, until I finally found a website dedicated to Java Sound and how the heck to get it to work. Finally I found out that my problem was indeed a bug in the Java framework itself, and the only way to fix it was a hack. That largely came to stand for what I dislike about the language.

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