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DJ N3X

Got a Dream...Don't got Prog. Skills....

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Ok...I have this great vision. It probably won't make the billion dollar mark...but a good game nonetheless. The vision will be posted on the "HELP WANTED" thread...when I'm ready. The problem is...well I have no game programming experience. Where do I learn OpenGL? DirectX? ...first step, I here, is Visual Basic... Well...if I want to learn Visual Basic...Where DO I BEGIN? Please help... I know HTML...if that helps... I'm also well experienced in pixel art...(and IPA-isometric pixel art) My guess is: First Step: Learn Visual Basic Second: Learn DX Third: Learn OpenGL Fourth: Make a few basic games Fifth: Start planning the team Am I right anywhere? P.S. I learn quick....I learnt html in 10 min....(of course...html is probably the easiest code ever....) Please....I'm not the average noob who thinks he'll be the next CEO of EA Games or sumthin....My ideas are reasonable....plz help me sumone!

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Guest Anonymous Poster
Buy yourself a book like: coding quake 4 in 10 lessons or something like that, dude.

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You'll want to learn C and C++ for DirectX while with OpenGL you can choose other languages as well. DirectX has adio, keyboard input, mouse input, graphics, while OpenGL is just graphics only, but if you use SDL you can do all the other stuff that I mentioned for DirectX.

When you get to DirectX or OpenGL, stick with one, and make a few games and then decide if you'd like to learn the other. DirectX is Windows only while OpenGL is cross platform. It can run on Windows, Mac, and Linux.

What skills do you have right now besides what you've mentioned. Do you know any programming languages like BASIC?

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I'm basically a noob
I saw a few sites for python...but yea...i have no idea wut basic even is (cept that its just another prog language) i heard of it though....
Jeez I'm so ashamed of myself :P
I just need to know steps to learning gme programming and being good at it....
do i learn basic first? C, C++?

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Guest Anonymous Poster
First Step: Learn Python
Second: Learn Pygame
Third: Practice
Fourth: Make a few basic games (at least one)
Fifth: More practice

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I've been to the nehe site..but it suggests learning vbasic first...visual basic is another lang....its used in opengl? maybe i shud start wit C++, then dx...then play round wit it....? once i figure out where to start learnin..then ill buy some books..i guess

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Guest Anonymous Poster
Learn at least one of them, dude! don´t try to build rome in two days, you ain´t gonna master anything with that attitude and anxiety... the important things is the logic, the mechanics behind the games!!!! study, implement, change stuff, practice!!! trial and error, man

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a8....i guess ill study pyhton over the next few days....any suggestions for tutorials? python.org ? im dl'in 2.4.1

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Guest Anonymous Poster
It´s all about the algorithms, not speed... study from the masters... download the quake source code or something, work with existing and stable, mature game engines, you got plenty to choose from, build your stuff on top of them

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If you think you can pick up programming languages easily you should skip java and just go to C++. It is helpful to have some prog. experience before C++ because most of the books arent really written well for ppl with no prog. experience. Try out deitel & deitels book though, i had their book for another prog. lang and it was very good. After that get a book on the STL ( josuttis ), then get the C++ prog. lang as a tutorial / reference

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Mm my advice would be to settle on a language now and dig in... You can always come back and learn other languages and it will become easier and easier if you know the basics of programming.

Alot of people suggest Python and PyGame but I myself have never even looked at Python code.

I began on QBASIC about 3 years ago which I did for about 8 weeks, 1 hour per week instead of sport. The desire to impress my teacher pushed me far ahead everyone else doing it, so that was year 8 and my first introduction to programming. Next I learnt HTML from Complete Idiots guide to HTML, then I moved into C++ which was my first true programming language. For over a year now I have been playing with DirectX, SDL, OpenGL and my advice to you is not to plan to learn opengl then create a game... Look at the lessons and do there examples then create a game because as you create that game you will learn 1000 times more than just reading and doing the excercises.

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Guest Anonymous Poster
Actually, what I mean is code structure, it´s all about structure and management, then the algorithms... one thing is to write an engine from scratch, I guess there was an excellent series of tutorials from Chris Hargrove about that, other thing is to write games on top of existing game engines, I´d suggest you go with the latter, there´s clanlib, panda3d, torque, quake... so many to choose from!

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Quote:
Original post by Anonymous Poster
First Step: Learn Python
Second: Learn Pygame
Third: Practice
Fourth: Make a few basic games (at least one)
Fifth: More practice


Okay...so once I master python...how do ilearn to make the 3d games? :D
Btw...any suggetsions for good pyton tutorials?

ty for all the help

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Guest Anonymous Poster
modding is also an excellent chance to get your hands at game creation

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Learn a language, learn the design patterns, learn the architecture, learn a grahics API, than post on the Help Wanted forum in about a year or two if you're good :)

Or you could post on Help Wanted thinking that ideas are actually worth something (just FYI a game idea or vision is worth absolutely nothing just to clear that up), get one.. maybe two noob programmers that really can't accomplish anything, get frustrated and give up... which is a progression I see many beginners take.

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Guest Anonymous Poster
have a look at the tuts in the pygame site, cool stuff

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Start here, and here. Reading those should give you some idea of what you need to do. Then, come back here if you still have questions. (Which you probably will.)

IMHO, stay away from Visual Basic. The language has its advantages, but it isn't really targeted at game programming. If you want a career in programming, learn C++, since it is the industry standard. Otherwise learn Python or C#, which are easy to work with like Visualy Basic, but lack many of its shortcommings.

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Well, first you'll start with 2D games as 3D is more difficult then 2D and you'll want to make small games as your first games (i.e. Pong, Tetris, Mario Clone) then when move onto 3D. 3D will involve linear algebra, trigenometry, and maybe some Calculus.

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Guest Anonymous Poster
if you aim to getting a job in the game dev industry i´d suggest you do as the folks at the companies say: mod their engines, show em what you can do with their technology, that means knowing basically any oop language, and some api, opengl specially... i guess? it was like that back in the raven days at least

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Okay...

Step 1: Learn Python...pygame...practice..more practice...etc...
Step 2: Learn C++...practice...make sum stuff...practice
Step 3: Learn DX, opengl, or qbasic...and stick wit my choice...keep practicin

After all that...I look at torque, and check the source of quake

Hmm....ill be busy over the next (EDIT:) few years....
tyvm for all your help ppl

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Quote:
Original post by DJ N3X
Hmm....ill be busy over the next few months...

If you are even near serious than replace 'few months' with 'many months' or 'years'.

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Ppl can learn all that in a few months, if they put alot of time into it (12 hrs a day every day)

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Guest Anonymous Poster
Ppl can learn all that in a few months, if they put alot of time into it (12 hrs a day every day)

=========================

Dude, are we talking about real ppl here? or you meant....mmm.....droids?

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Quote:
Original post by Gink
Ppl can learn all that in a few months, if they put alot of time into it (12 hrs a day every day)

Sure if you are talking about putting together a tetris clone or something in that amount of time. The OP mentioned commercial products and money, which means developing commercial games, which is far beyond just hobby tetris development.

I know people who have been working in indie game development for 3-5 years now and still couldn't put together commercial engines / games. Learning APIs, languages, etc are the easy parts to learn.. the experience and architecture is what is costly timewise.

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Quote:
Original post by Saruman
Quote:
Original post by Gink
Ppl can learn all that in a few months, if they put alot of time into it (12 hrs a day every day)

Sure if you are talking about putting together a tetris clone or something in that amount of time. The OP mentioned commercial products and money, which means developing commercial games, which is far beyond just hobby tetris development.

I know people who have been working in indie game development for 3-5 years now and still couldn't put together commercial engines / games. Learning APIs, languages, etc are the easy parts to learn.. the experience and architecture is what is costly timewise.


yeah i was referring to the python,c++,dx, i agree with u tho.

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