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GameMasterXL

Game Developing Computers?

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I am wanting to build a pc for developing my game on and have found lots of realy cool hardware that will be good to use and NVidias SLI. I am wondering is SLI any good for me if i am just going to be using one 17/18/19" monitor? and are these specs any good for a media pc. Specs processor: Intel Pentium Double-Thread 3.40GHZ with HT tech 2mb L2 cache Graphics: Nvidia GForce 6800/7800 SLI compatible Motherboard: NVidia NForce4 intel edition SLI Comptaible Sound: Sound Blaster others: Duel ultra-cool Fans 10 USB 2.0 support 2 vidio buffers MPEG-Encoder and Decoder support for duel monitors OS: Microsoft Windows Xp Media Center 2005 edition Is this a good computer? and will it be fine for my programming and 3d development? pleas list all your comments.

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Programming actually doesn't require much in the way of computer muscle. Beyond wanting a fast compile, you pretty much just want a computer capable of executing the programs you write.

SLI will be more or less useless for development; from what I've heard, SLI only supports those applications that are specifically recognized by the drivers (in other words, it has to be programmed in per-game by nVidia).

Why are you using the "Media Center" edition of Windows XP?

I haven't heard of people actually using an MPEG encoder card in years. Do you really need to do much high-quality real-time MPEG stream authoring? If not, your CPU will do fine for encoding.

Overall, it kind of sounds like you looked at a few components with really impressive buzzwords ("Ooh! Ultra-cool! I want that!") and were seduced by their charm. Take some time to actually figure out what the heck they mean. Some mean nothing.

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Quote:
Original post by Sneftel
Overall, it kind of sounds like you looked at a few components with really impressive buzzwords ("Ooh! Ultra-cool! I want that!") and were seduced by their charm. Take some time to actually figure out what the heck they mean. Some mean nothing.


like Vantec "Stealth". so quiet, you would think it's a dead fan... oh wait...

Get a couple of panaflo L1A fans for quiet, or M1A for better performance for little sound, or H1A for high performance but not U1A if you value your hearing.

I agree with Sneftel. SLI is a waste for developing if you're not backed 100% by nVidia's developer support center to work out issues and bugs. As is the Media Center version of Windows. Save the money and buy another LCD or CRT for dual-monitor -- it's much more worth it. Straight WindowsXP is where you want to be.

In this instance, I would also look at an AMD platform, but it really doesn't matter which one you use.

Just don't be fooled into high frame rates with that system if you don't have a slower system to really check what the mass audience will experience [wink]

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Original post by GameMasterXL
But the computer will also be doing stuff in 3ds Max and photoshop, illustrator, and for gaming to.

The only thing among those that really needs a high-end PC is rendering in 3ds max; and if you're doing modelling for use in games, you probably won't be doing very much rendering at all. Certainly a better use of your money would be high-speed RAM, which will help Photoshop.

Look, here's an example. Why do you need "2 vidio buffers"?

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Lol that was just for media center but if i don't need it then there is no point in them. What about the intel double-thread 3.40 GHZ 2mb L2 cache processor? and a 1gb ram with 260 gb HD and NVidia NForce4 intel edittion motherboard?

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Man are you working on Halo 3? You don't need a super-hyper-mega computer to develop games. Use something that matches (aproximatelly) the target machine and then add some speed to the CPU and some RAM, to speed up the development tools. Notice that i said "to speed up" - it's not really required.

Of course if you want it to develop AND to play AND money is no problem, buy the best you can. ;)

By the way, if money is no problem, can we be friends? :D

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Lol money is big problem, so what about the NVidia NForce4 motherboard is that any good? and intel pentium 4 with hT 3.40GHZ 2mb L2 cache is that usefull for running my game engine and getting otpimal graphics and performance when running 3ds max or photoshop ect?

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If you're dead set on buying a new computer, read this thread.

But really, it's not necessary, at least for the basic stuff. At some point you might find yourself wanting to do things the system isn't capable of, at which point an upgrade makes sense.

If you're using the machine for other things, gaming in particular, that's a major consideration, of course.

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You could program on a $50 doller computer and use 3ds on a $250 computer. If money is a problem just go on ebay they ussually have good deals or just buy a package. If you wanna test out your game engine just get a tester with good specs.

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